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UW team stores digital images in DNA — and retrieves them perfectly 

UW team stores digital images in DNA — and retrieves them perfectly  | Communication design | Scoop.it
DNA molecules can store information many millions of times more densely than existing technologies for digital storage — flash drives, hard drives, magnetic and optical media. Those systems also degrade after a few years or decades, while DNA can reliably preserve information for centuries. DNA is best suited for archival applications, rather than instances where files need to be accessed immediately.

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Dennis T OConnor's curator insight, April 13, 1:16 PM

Where will we store all the information we are generating? This report suggests that DNA storage may be 

Prometheus's curator insight, May 19, 4:29 PM
Bio tech for info storage...science fiction no longer
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18 Visions Of The City Of The Future, From The Past

18 Visions Of The City Of The Future, From The Past | Communication design | Scoop.it

In 1939, visitors stood in line for hours to see the Futurama exhibit at the New York World's Fair, a detailed model imagining 1960s America. Complete with half a million tiny buildings and a million handmade miniature trees, it also visualized a network of highways crossing the country. And while the interstate system probably would have been built without it, it's arguable that the visualization—sponsored by GM—helped the roads happen.

A new exhibit called the Future City, up now at London's Royal Institute of British Architects, looks at how drawings and models of futuristic cities can shape the cities that actually are built.

"Visualizations of future cities contribute to our collective imagination," says Nick Dunn from Lancaster University "They provide us with visionary projections of how we might live. Reexamining these from a historical perspective can give us new insights and greater understanding of the developments and patterns that shape the present, and in turn, their implications for our future."


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Timeline of the far future

Timeline of the far future | Communication design | Scoop.it

From BBC Future:

What do we expect will happen in one thousand years time? Or one million years? Or even one billion? As our amazing timeline shows, there may be trouble ahead.

First, we brought you a prediction of the forthcoming year. Then we brought you a timeline of the near future, revealing what could happen up to around 100 years time. But here’s our most ambitious set of predictions yet – from what could happen in one thousand years time to one hundred quintillion years (that’s 100,000,000,000,000,000,000 years)...


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Collaborative Curation and Personalization The Future of Museums: A Study Report

Collaborative Curation and Personalization  The Future of Museums: A Study Report | Communication design | Scoop.it

This report highlights a number of key trends that will have a significant impact on the user experience and design of future collections and museums.


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Jennifer Ryan's curator insight, November 10, 2013 5:04 PM

This is right up my alley. Looking forward to reading about trends and impacts.

Erica Bilder's curator insight, November 15, 2013 7:11 AM

I have nothing to add to Robin Good's terrific insights:

 Robin Good's insight:

 

 

Picture these scenarios:
 

The Victoria & Albert Museum, its collections depleted by massive repatriation, becomes a travel & tourism guide and international affairs ambassador in an increasingly globalized community
 The Freud Museum, in the spirit of its namesake, becomes a provider of mental retreat and therapy (I wonder if the docents will be licensed psychoanalysis?)

These, according to the 40-page report “Museums in a Digital Age” from Arups, may actually be some of the likely new profiles of prestigious museums 25 years from now.  

 

The report projects that:

 

"...future museums will see personalised content, new levels of sustainability and a visitor experience extended beyond present expectations of time and space."

 

A rising desire among audiences to shape their own cultural experiences (“Collaborative Curation”)
 The opportunity for museum to become “curators of experiences” that extend beyond the boundaries of traditional exhibits or programs, or beyond the walls of the museum itself.

 

Source: http://futureofmuseums.blogspot.it/2013/11/museums-in-future-view-from-across-pond.html ;

 The idea of "collaborative curation" of museum collections by the actual users-visitors, is particularly fascinating.  "Just as current consumer trends shift towards collaborative consumption, in the future, museums may employ new patterns of collaborative curation,allowing for individually curated experiences and giving the public greater control over both content and experience.
Increased visitor participation will allow people themselves to reinvent the museum experience, enabling content that can adapt to the preferences of users in real-time." 

 

My comment: If you are a curator and are interested in exploring and understanding what the future of large collections and museums may look like and which forces are going to be driving such changes, this is a good report to read.

 

Insightful. Inspiring 8/10



Original Report: Museums in the Digital Age: 
http://www.arup.com/Publications/Museums_in_the_Digital_Age.aspx ;

 

PDF: http://www.arup.com/~/media/Files/PDF/Publications/Research_and_whitepapers/2013_Arup_FRI_MuseumsintheDigitalAge_final_web.ashx 

 

Amanda Gregorio's curator insight, October 10, 2014 4:36 PM

Interesting notion

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The Future of Data Visualization Tools

The Future of Data Visualization Tools | Communication design | Scoop.it

Data is everywhere and well-designed data graphics can be both beautiful and meaningful. As visualizations take center stage in a data-centric world, researchers and developers spend much time understanding and creating better visualizations. But they spend just as much time understanding how tools can help programmers and designers create visualizations faster, more effectively, and more enjoyably.

 

As any visualization practitioner will tell you, turning a dataset from raw stuff in a file to a final result in a picture is far from a single-track, linear path. Rather, there is a constant iteration of competing designs, tweaking and evaluating at once their pros and cons. The visualization research community has recognized the importance of keeping track of this process.

 

Read the complete article to learn more about the future of the practice and the tools that enable designers to create thoughtful infographics and visualizations...


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How to Build a City on the Moon

How to Build a City on the Moon | Communication design | Scoop.it

The very idea of a moon city ignites a constellation of questions about what it would look like and how we would build it. So CityLab called Woerner to find out. With the International Space Station potentially coming offline around 2024, he says, it’s time to envision the next era of human presence beyond Earth. The moon-city project would be a prime driver of technological advancement as well as basic scientific research.


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Future Living Housing Project: Technology Meets Design

Future Living Housing Project: Technology Meets Design | Communication design | Scoop.it

The Future Living house took twenty six designers to create it, with every technologic leap analyzed to make sure all proposals were possible by 2050. It’s a paradigm shift in home resource creation and location with water using gravity to generate pressure and energy harvested from solar and wind. Air, water and waste are cleaned using a living bio wall.


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Zsolt Tinelly's curator insight, January 1, 2015 2:43 PM

add meg a belátás ...

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, April 10, 2015 8:54 PM

Making cities sustainable 

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How robotic drones will change our lives as early as 2015

How robotic drones will change our lives as early as 2015 | Communication design | Scoop.it
Flying robots have proven themselves capable sheep herders, delivery boys, filmmakers and spies. Now, when can we have one?

 

Herding sheep, delivering pizza, guiding lost students around campus -- these are just a few things friendly drones can do. Company and DIY drones are on the rise, and not even Hollywood stars will be safe from them. Soon starlets might be acting in front of drone-mounted cameras or being chased by a UAV paparazzi.

 

Though drones have incredible commercial potential, most countries restrict its use. The U.S. is expected to open up drones for commercial use by 2015. 


Proponents are eager to point out the many ways they're going to make our lives better. "Really, this technology is an extra tool to help an industry be more effective," says Gretchen West, the executive vice president for the Association for Unmanned Vehicle Systems International (AUVSI).  AUVSI estimates the U.S. loses $10 billion yearly by delaying drone integration. Though drones bring up privacy concerns, some argue it could advance privacy law.


"With precision agriculture, for example, it can take pictures of fields so farmers can identify problems they wouldn't necessarily see walking through the fields. In law enforcement, you could find a child lost in the woods more easily than walking through a field, particularly if there's bad weather or treacherous ground."


While it may seem that drones are set to take over our lives, the reality is a bit more complicated. Drone usage around the world is definitely picking up in the public sector, but when it comes to commercial activity, many countries have strict limitations.


The United States doesn't allow for commercial drone usage at all, though that's expected to change in 2015, when the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) aims to put a plan in place to integrate drones in U.S. airspace. In the meantime, says West, the U.S. is losing $10 billioons in potential economic impact for every year the FAA delays.

 

"I think the U.S. has been the leader in this technology, and I think there's a risk of losing that first-mover aspect the longer we wait on regulations," she says.



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Inside Arcology, the City of the Future (Infographic)

Inside Arcology, the City of the Future (Infographic) | Communication design | Scoop.it

For over a century, writers and architects have imagined the cities of the future.

 In the late 1960s, architect Paolo Soleri envisioned “arcology” - a word that combines “architecture” and “ecology," with a goal of building structures to house large populations in self-contained environments with a self-sustaining economy and agriculture. “In the three-dimensional city, man defines a human ecology. In it he is a country dweller and metropolitan man in one. By it the inner and the outer are at ‘skin’ distance. He has made the city in his own image. Arcology: the city in the image of man.” (Paolo Soleri)
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luiy's curator insight, July 8, 2013 7:42 AM
For over a century, writers and architects have imagined the cities of the future as giant structures that contain entire metropolises. To some, these buildings present the best means for cities to exist in harmony with nature, while others forsee grotesque monstrosities destructive to the human spirit. In the mid-20th century, engineer and futurist R. Buckminster Fuller imagined city-enclosing plastic domes and enormous housing projects resembling nuclear cooling towers. These ideas are impractical but they explore the limits of conventional architectural thinking.  Science fiction writers and artists often imagine future architecture that oppresses the human spirit. Megastructures such as the pyramid-like Tyrell Buildings of “Blade Runner” dominate a decrepit skyline. The decaying old city is simply covered with layers of newer, larger buildings in a process of “retrofitting.” Beginning in the late 1960s, architect Paolo Soleri envisioned a more humane approach. The word “arcology” is a combination of “architecture” and “ecology.” The goal is to build megastructures that would house a population of a million or more people, but in a self-contained environment with its own economy and agriculture. “In the three-dimensional city, man defines a human ecology. In it he is a country dweller and metropolitan man in one. By it the inner and the outer are at ‘skin’ distance. He has made the city in his own image. Arcology: the city in the image of man.” (Paolo Soleri) In 1996, a group of 75 Japanese corporations commissioned Soleri to design the one-kilometer-tall Hyper Bulding, a vertical city for 100,000 people. Existing in harmony with nature, the Hyper Building was designed to recycle waste, produce food in greenhouses, and use the sun’s light and heat for power and climate control.  The structure was designed for passive heating and cooling without the need for machinery. An economic recession put the brakes on the project and it was never built. Soleri’s arcology concept is being put to the test in the Arcosanti experimental community being built in Arizona. Construction began in 1970. When complete the town will house 5,000 people. Buildings are composed of locally produced concrete and are designed to capture sunlight and heat. To be built in the desert near Abu Dhabi, Masdar is a 2.3-square-mile (6 sq km) planned city of 40,000 residents. Buildings are designed to reduce reliance on artificial lighting and air conditioning, and the city will run entirely on solar power and renewable energy. Begun in 2006, the project is planned for completion around 2020-2025.
Fàtima Galan's curator insight, July 9, 2013 5:44 AM

Amazing and beautiful analysis!! Believe it or not, the science fiction also has something to teach us about the city of tomorrow.