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The Museum of Modern Art launches the Free Online Course Seeing Through Photographs

The Museum of Modern Art launches the Free Online Course Seeing Through Photographs | Communication design | Scoop.it

The Museum of Modern Art launches Seeing Through Photographs, its first massive open online course for a general audience, available on Coursera starting February 10, 2016. Using works from MoMA’s expansive collection as a point of departure, the course encourages participants to look critically at photographs through the diverse ideas, approaches, and technologies that inform their making. Seeing Through Photographs can be found at coursera.org/learn/photography. 


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Making The Jump Into eLearning—12 Tips For a Strong Start

Making The Jump Into eLearning—12 Tips For a Strong Start | Communication design | Scoop.it
There are several types of eLearning courses, but if you want to create an effective one, then there are some ideas you need to follow every time. Cr

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Beth Dichter's curator insight, July 2, 2014 10:37 PM

Are you interested in creating an eLearning experience for your students, or are currently teaching online, but would like some tips to make your course more effective. This post provides 12 tips that will help you get started (or improve what you may have).

Below are four of the tips. Each is explained in more detail in the post.

* Understand your audience - To keep your audience engaged, you must understand their needs. Who are they? What do they require?

* Don't overload it - It is easy to add more information to a course, but this may overload your students. Be careful about how much is included and consider breaking information into smaller modules so that students can be more successful.

* Interaction to engage learners - Make sure that you design your course so it is interactive. Clicking quickly from one page to another may not help students learn the information. Encourage engagement through the use of quizzes, videos, and other interactive activities.

Much more is included in the post, and you will also find a link to a free e-book called Engage the Unengaged: How to Create More Engaging eLearning Courses.

Gary Harwell's curator insight, July 11, 2014 12:41 AM

We have to make that jump and actually put a course together. Not only for our program, but for us to learn some new skills that will be invaluable to our careers in the future.

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Cybercrime goes mobile

Cybercrime goes mobile | Communication design | Scoop.it

Corporate espionage has never been so easy. See how a simple app can transform your smartphone into an espionage tool in the hands of criminals, able to record your conversations, steal your text messages and spy on your private meetings.

 

Gust MEES: watch the video who explains in detail; very well explained...

http://www.net-security.org/secworld.php?id=13015

 

 

Check out also the available security tools :

http://www.scoop.it/t/ict-security-tools?q=mobile

 


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Studies Confirm the Power of Visuals in eLearning

Studies Confirm the Power of Visuals in eLearning | Communication design | Scoop.it

"We are now in the age of visual information where visual content plays a role in every part of life. As 65 percent of the population are visual learners, images are clearly key to engaging people in eLearning courses."


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Rosemary Tyrrell, Ed.D.'s curator insight, July 9, 2014 2:55 PM

Visual learning is an important part of learning in any platform. 

Pere Arcas's curator insight, July 14, 2014 3:55 AM

Now we need powerful visual creators of contents for education.

niftyjock's curator insight, July 15, 2014 6:19 PM

MULD

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Using Brain Research to Design Better eLearning Courses: 7 Tips for Success

Using Brain Research to Design Better eLearning Courses: 7 Tips for Success | Communication design | Scoop.it

"The brain is constantly on the lookout for ways to improve by obtaining new knowledge and skills, even before birth. Unfortunately, retaining information can be challenging, simply because instructors and course designers do not always use methods that facilitate remembering."


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Beth Dichter's curator insight, May 1, 2014 7:25 AM

As teachers we are course designers. We design a lesson and if we teach face2face we see immediate feedback while teaching. The same feedback is not as apparent online. One question that is being researched looks at what brain research tells us about designing better lessons, and what applies to eLearning typically applies to what happens in our classroom. This post provides seven tips, with an infographic that show each. Click through to the post to see more detailed information for each tip and to find additional resources.

Below are three of the tips:

* Favor recognition over recall

* Help learners avoid stress and fear

* Keep the working memory in mind

Chris Carter's comment, May 1, 2014 8:26 PM
Thank you, Beth Dichter!
carldowse's curator insight, August 22, 2014 6:06 AM

Reassuring confirmation of good practice based on experience

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10 Ways That Mobile Learning Will Revolutionize Education

10 Ways That Mobile Learning Will Revolutionize Education | Communication design | Scoop.it
Smartphones and tablet computers are radically transforming how we access our shared knowledge sources by keeping us constantly connected to near-infinite volumes of raw data and information.

 

Up until now, most people relegated “education” to a finite time in their lives: entering school at around five years old and attending school institutions all the way to university. Education had an expiration date, then working life began. This model, which has its roots in the industrial era, is quickly becoming less relevant or applicable to the way we live our lives in the connected age.

 

Read more:

http://www.fastcodesign.com/1669896/10-ways-that-mobile-learning-will-revolutionize-education

 


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Konstantinos Kalemis's comment, June 2, 2012 6:14 AM
The primary purpose of the Enrichment/Gifted and Talented Curriculum is to challenge eligible students to think differently and critically through a variety of instructional approaches. Such instructional approaches may include brainstorming, cooperative learning, oral demonstrations and presentations, creative analytical writing, and creative problem solving techniques.
The primary goal for the teacher/facilitator is to determine a particular area of study. Such study may include short term tasks as well as long term projects. Instruction then focuses on refining and expanding previously learned skills through practice and application.
Content consists of ideas, concepts, descriptive information, and facts. Content, as well as learning experiences, can be modified through acceleration, compacting, variety, reorganization, flexible pacing, and the use of more advanced or complex concepts, abstractions, and materials. If they master a particular unit, they need to be provided with more advanced learning activities, not more of the same activity. Their learning characteristics are best served by thematic, broad-based, and integrative content, rather than just single-subject areas. In addition, such concept-based instruction expands opportunities to generalize and to integrate and apply ideas. Middle and secondary schools are generally organized to meet student needs within content areas. Jacobs and Borland (1986) found that gifted students benefit greatly from curriculum experiences that cross or go beyond traditional content areas, particularly when they are encouraged to acquire an integrated understanding of knowledge and the structure of the disciplines.