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Content Curation from A to Z: An Online Course with Robin Good

Content Curation from A to Z: An Online Course with Robin Good | Communication design | Scoop.it

Content Curation from A to Z, a short online learning program, 
with Robin Good 


March 13th, April 24th and May 15th, from 12 to 14 (EST) 


Three online classes to learn everything you need to know to become a great content curator. 


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Gonzalo Moreno's curator insight, March 6, 2015 3:42 PM

There's always teachers, and MASTERS, like R.Good!
:)

Nedko Aldev's curator insight, April 19, 2015 2:25 PM

 

329
Hector Cortez's curator insight, August 13, 2015 4:46 PM

añada su visión ...

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How to be a Powerful Tweeter and Thrive in the Twitter Ecosystem

This piece was written by Megan Garber for The Atlantic

 

A study based on 43,000 responses to Tweets found precisely what people like and loathe about microblog posts.

 

Here are some of the findings:

 

**Twitter, as a communications platform, has evolved beyond nascent Twitter's charmingly mundane updates ("cleaning my apartment"; "hungry") and into something more crowd-conscious and curatorial.

 

**Though Twitter won't necessarily replace traditional news, it increasingly functions as a real-time newswire, disseminating and amplifying information gathered from the world and the web.

 

**At the same time, though, being social, it functions as a source of entertainment. Which means that we have increasingly high -- and increasingly normalized -- expectations for Twitter as both a place and a platform.

 

**We want it to enlighten us, but we also want it to amuse us.

In that context, tweets that are informative or funny -- or, ideally, informative and funny -- evoke the best responses.

 

 **Tweets that contain stale information, repeat conventional wisdom, offer uselessly de-contextual news, or extoll the virtues of the awesome salad I had for lunch today don't, ultimately, do much to justify themselves.

 

So: Do be useful. Do be novel. Do be compelling. Do not, under any circumstances, be boring.

 

This is what caught my attention:

 

****Contribute to the story: To keep people interested, add an opinion, a pertinent fact or otherwise add to the conversation before hitting "send" on a retweet.

 

Takeaway:

 

"The Twitter ecosystem values learning about new content," the study notes -- so new info, it seems, is new info, regardless of who provides it.  

 

**Sharing your own work conveys excitement about that work -- which means that self-promotion, rather than being a Twitter turn-off, can actually be an added value.

 

Curated by Jan Gordon covering " Content Curation, Social Business and Beyond"

 

Read full article here: [http://ht.ly/8OrS8]


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Curating Information & Making Sense of Data Is a Key Skill for the Future [Research]

Curating Information & Making Sense of Data Is a Key Skill for the Future [Research] | Communication design | Scoop.it

Robin Good: The Institute for the Future and the University of Phoenix have teamed up to produce, this past spring, an interesting report entitled Future Work Skills 2020.

 

By looking at the set of emerging skills that this research identifies as vital for future workers, I can't avoid but recognize the very skillset needed by any professional curator or newsmaster.

 

It should only come as a limited surprise to realize that in an information economy, the most valuable skills are those that can harness that primary resource, "information", in new, and immediately useful ways.

 

And being the nature of information like water, which can adapt and flow depending on context, the task of the curator is one of seeing beyond the water,

to the unique rare fish swimming through it.

 

The curator's key talent being the one of recognizing that depending on who you are fishing for, the kind of fish you and other curators could see within the same water pool, may be very different. 

 

 

Here the skills that information-fishermen of the future will need the most:

 

1) Sense-making:

ability to determine the deeper meaning or significance of what is being expressed

 

2) Social intelligence:

ability to connect to others in a deep and direct way, to sense and stimulate reactions and desired interactions

 

3) Novel and adaptive thinking:

proficiency at thinking and coming up with solutions and responses beyond that which is rote or rule-based

 

4) Cross-cultural competency:

ability to operate in different cultural settings

 

5) Computational thinking:

ability to translate vast amounts of data into abstract concepts and to understand data-based reasoning

 

6) New media literacy:

ability to critically assess and develop content that uses new media forms, and to leverage these media for persuasive communication

 

7) Transdisciplinarity:

literacy in and ability to understand concepts across multiple disciplines

 

8) Design mindset:

ability to represent and develop tasks and work processes for desired outcomes

 

9) Cognitive load management:

ability to discriminate and filter information for importance, and to understand how to maximize cognitive functioning using a variety of tools and techniques

 

10) Virtual collaboration:

ability to work productively, drive engagement, and demonstrate presence as a member of a virtual team

 

 

Critical to understand the future ahead. 9/10

 

Curated by Robin Good

 

Executive Summary of the Report: https://docs.google.com/viewer?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapolloresearchinstitute.com%2Fsites%2Fdefault%2Ffiles%2Ffuture-work-skills-executive-summary.pdf 

 

Download a PDF copy of Future Work Skills 2020: https://docs.google.com/viewer?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapolloresearchinstitute.com%2Fsites%2Fdefault%2Ffiles%2Ffuture-skills-2020-research-report.pdf  


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Beth Kanter's comment, December 20, 2011 7:34 PM
Thanks for sharing this from Robin's stream. These skills sets could form the basis of a self-assessment for would-be curators, although they're more conceptual - than practical/tactical. Thanks for sharing and must go rescoop it with a credit you and Robin of course
janlgordon's comment, December 20, 2011 7:56 PM
Beth Kanter
Agreed. It's also one of the articles I told you about....good info to build on:-)
Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, September 4, 2014 2:34 AM

Curating Information and Data Sense-Making Is The Key Skill for the Future [Research]

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Twitter (Trust) research: It's Where the Money & Action is

Twitter (Trust) research: It's Where the Money & Action is | Communication design | Scoop.it

Bob Brown of Network World has curated news of two very interesting Twitter research projects that caught my attention.


We all agree that freedom of speech is good,  and it's great that everyone can now  become a publisher. However, there's a double-edged sword: If we speak to a friend before we think something though, all will surely be forgiven and forgotten. After all, we all make mistakes. But if you click that Tweet or Share button too quickly, either succumbing to knee-jerk reactions or without first checking the facts, you may find the digital world to be less forgiving.


Content curators have to be especially vigilent about curating someone else's content to make sure the facts and information are correct.


I believe the research related to here is essential reading, as it is furtherment of an established and growing trend:


One relates to Wellesley College's Department of Computer Science where two professors have been awarded a near half million dollar National Science Foundation grant to:


****build an application that gauges the trustworthiness of information shared on social networks, and in particular Twitter.


This was originally envisioned as a form of spammer identification, but


****has broadened to be able to determine the past history of a tweeter and also whether information being received is available from multiple sources. 


The other brings us news of 'Tweetographer', a huge Data Mining project by two University of Cincinatti Computer Science students, descibed as:


"a real-time events guide extracted from information coming via large numbers of tweets." 


This could be available as a web or mobile app at the end of the year and one of the co-creators, Billy Clifton (his partner is Alex Padgett)


**sees the uses expanding in the future to predict election results and compiling product reviews.


My takeaways are:


**that we all need to be very aware that what we tweet today can and may be used against us in the future


**search is still very much in its infancy when it comes to engine sophistication, stay tuned.


Curated by Jan Gordon covering "Content Curation, Social Media & Beyond"


Read full article here: [http://bit.ly/s00504]


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How to Curate Content Effectively

How to Curate Content Effectively | Communication design | Scoop.it

It's been said that if you want something, go find people who have what you want and ask them how they got it. Margie is a perfect example of someone who is successful, knows how to build community and definitely creates and curates consistent content.


Here's an excerpt from her latest post on curating:


This is what we're doing on scoopit!


I also ask people to let me know what they were reading that they liked. A lot of people took advantage of this opportunity, and when I did my round-ups I would credit those people by saying, “Xyz brought this post to my attention…” This helps you build your community on a lot of different levels, it exposes you to content you might not otherwise have seen, and you get to network with the new bloggers, too. It worked out pretty well for me in terms of teaching me the ropes of the online world.


My advice to you


If you want to get started curating some content, there are lots of different paths you could set your feet on. The most important thing is to make sure you keep it manageable. Like most facets of the online world, curating content can very quickly begin to eat your life. So here is what I would try:


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Content Curation In 45 Minutes A Day... And Free

Content Curation In 45 Minutes A Day... And Free | Communication design | Scoop.it

I’m sure a lot of you guys have looked into curation software available ...

Obviously with the radically different price points they all do different things, but here’s the gist – a whole lot of this you can do for free.

 

Step One – Define your Parameters

Define your parameters by where you want the goods to go. Make sure everything is accessible from the beginning so you can leverage your curated content efficiently from the start.


Step Two – Choose your Weapons

e.g. Timely.is; G+ and FB

 

Step Three – Be Intentional with your Schedule

I can’t speak to your industry/niche but I can tell you that when I do my curation at somewhere between 6 and 8am EST I find a goldmine of posts that are brand-flipping-new

 

Step Four – Be Crazy Time Sensitive

I make sure to only curate content that is timely [less than 1% of the time curate something more than 24 hours old]

Open up a google search and type in “content marketing” at the beginning of my day, and set it to the last 24 hours.

 

Step Five – Be Consistent

As long as you are curating the same general stuff over and over it will work for you.


Notice: Steps 1-5 are all about the setup or protocol. Steps 6-9 are the actual daily work.

 

Step Six – Prepare for Battle

Open windows to the following places:

Google search
Timely.is
WP dashboard to my curation site
Google +
Facebook
Twitter
I also have a Word document open

 

Step Seven – Get Rolling

e.g. search for the term “content marketing” in the last 24 hours as shown above; grab 5 or 6 posts that are relevant and make tweets about them and put them on timely/buffer/scoopit

 

Step Eight – Natural Overflow

Doing twitter first thing after curation is great, if you have the time.

20-30 minutes after you have your automated posts in place to interact with your feed, clean out the spam tweeps, follow back the real people, etc.

 

Step Nine – Use what you Learn

Use your curation is as the basis for your own blogs

Not regurgitation, but rather letting your new-found knowledge fuel your next post. Or, add to the list of blog ideas you have on a running list somewhere.

 

Setting aside this 45 minutes a day to get the most relevant pieces of content your industry has to offer can not only fill your feeds, but it can also fuel your entire day. And it should, because you should be talking about the latest things in your industry.

 

Great ideas by Amie Marse - http://bit.ly/HfET6B ;


Via maxOz, janlgordon
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Matmi's comment, April 5, 2012 8:16 AM
Some great tips. Would you also spend the time commenting on the curated posts? I know there are some who believe that it is a necessity and others who feel there is no need as you are merely helping others to filter the noise. I try to mix it up depending on time available.
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The Future of Journalism

The Future of Journalism | Communication design | Scoop.it

I selected this piece by Ross Dawson for The Future of Journalism blog. Ross is one of my trusted sources and he continues to shed light on the future of journalism.

 

My commentary:

 

I see clear parallels between journalists and content curators and believe these are at least partly demonstrated by the points I have chosen to quote and particularly the smaller portions I bolded. I look forward to clear and growing collaborations . We have much to learn from each other.

 

Ross also points out the trend towards personalized and local news delivery and suggests that journalists will need to understand how social curation works. And for me, this is the key to the overlap between the established profession of journalism and the still developing discipline of content curation.

 

Ross sets the tone by stating:

 

"There are eight aspects of news that its audience will value, be prepared to pay for, and that will provide a viable financial foundation for quality journalism in the emerging media environment."

 

The article delves into each of these.  Here's what particularly caught my attention.

 

**Timeliness is becoming ever-more important in a world ravenous for immediacy.

 

**Investigative reporting will retain a central role in society. Increasingly this will involve data analysis, and often harnessing information and insights provided by many citizens.

 

**Insight, through adding context, analysis, and synthesis to news, is where some of the greatest value lies, particularly in business and political journalism.

 

**Those who can provide this insight, be they domain experts or journalists with the requisite breadth of experience, will always have a bright future.

 

**The skills required to present information, ideas and data in a visual and highly aesthetic format will shift far closer to the heart of what it is to be a journalist.

 

Curated by Jan Gordon covering "Content Curation, Social Media and Beyond"

 

Read full article here: [http://bit.ly/zn9rpM]


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nuphero's comment, March 2, 2012 6:32 AM
Hi there

When I go to full article link, the site says it must provide account and password to login. Does this content commercial or this site is private?

Thanks you.
janlgordon's comment, March 2, 2012 11:36 AM
Nuphero
Hi There, I just checked this link and it's something new, it wasn't like this before. I'll try to find you another link. You might also google I tried to get it on Google and it comes up the same way. So sorry, about this. Will have to check into this and see what's going on......
nuphero's comment, March 3, 2012 1:26 PM
Hi janlgordon

Thanks for your respond. After some tricks with Google, thanks to some keywords of your curated version, I now can read the original post. So don't worry
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Make Your Audience Your Newsroom: Civicboom

Make Your Audience Your Newsroom: Civicboom | Communication design | Scoop.it

"Civicboom is an online platform designed to facilitate content-driven organizations and individuals to work together in generating rich media content.

 

Content-seekers can place a request for specific content. Then, by using the Civicboom mobile app (Android), or by uploading to the plug & go site, a content-creator can respond with rich-media directly to that request.

 

All incoming rich-media content is then managed by the content-seeker, and directed to a customizable plugin to be embedded on a website."

Read more about it here: http://thenextweb.com/media/2011/11/12/civicboom-this-open-platform-lets-organizations-request-content-from-their-audience/

 

Sign-up here:  https://www.civicboom.com/

 


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janlgordon's comment, November 15, 2011 4:28 PM
This is great Robin!
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Content Curators Playing A Larger Role Online

Content Curators Playing A Larger Role Online | Communication design | Scoop.it

Tony Obregon wrote this piece on his blog - tonyobregon.com. It was curated by janlgordon covering her topic "Content Curation, Social Media and Beyond" on Scoopit 


Tony reminds us that content curators play a role in information overload - they take time to sort, select, comment on good content that helps keeps you current on your topic of interest.


Tony says:


"With the ever increasing amount of online information from social networks, the need for organizing it has never been greater. Look around and there’s no shortage of aggregation tools to help us filter out the important stuff."


Here's what caught my attention:


**In this world of information overload, there’s now a new layer in the media ecosystem: the curator. If it wasn’t for that person who retweeted the story in the first place, you probably wouldn’t have seen it.


**So naming the retweeters in daily promos is the right course of action. Twitter is like a fire hose and Paper.li is selecting random tweets that would have otherwise been missed.


**Yes, they’re randomly chosen but I find a lot of value in them because they praise others for their contributions.


**It reminds me that they’re part of my network and I can appreciate their contributions that much more. I know when I’m named in someone’s newspaper it motivates me to continue sharing that type of content.


http://www.tonyobregon.com/2011/10/03/content-curators-playing-a-larger-role-online/


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