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Content Curation In 45 Minutes A Day... And Free

Content Curation In 45 Minutes A Day... And Free | Communication design | Scoop.it

I’m sure a lot of you guys have looked into curation software available ...

Obviously with the radically different price points they all do different things, but here’s the gist – a whole lot of this you can do for free.

 

Step One – Define your Parameters

Define your parameters by where you want the goods to go. Make sure everything is accessible from the beginning so you can leverage your curated content efficiently from the start.


Step Two – Choose your Weapons

e.g. Timely.is; G+ and FB

 

Step Three – Be Intentional with your Schedule

I can’t speak to your industry/niche but I can tell you that when I do my curation at somewhere between 6 and 8am EST I find a goldmine of posts that are brand-flipping-new

 

Step Four – Be Crazy Time Sensitive

I make sure to only curate content that is timely [less than 1% of the time curate something more than 24 hours old]

Open up a google search and type in “content marketing” at the beginning of my day, and set it to the last 24 hours.

 

Step Five – Be Consistent

As long as you are curating the same general stuff over and over it will work for you.


Notice: Steps 1-5 are all about the setup or protocol. Steps 6-9 are the actual daily work.

 

Step Six – Prepare for Battle

Open windows to the following places:

Google search
Timely.is
WP dashboard to my curation site
Google +
Facebook
Twitter
I also have a Word document open

 

Step Seven – Get Rolling

e.g. search for the term “content marketing” in the last 24 hours as shown above; grab 5 or 6 posts that are relevant and make tweets about them and put them on timely/buffer/scoopit

 

Step Eight – Natural Overflow

Doing twitter first thing after curation is great, if you have the time.

20-30 minutes after you have your automated posts in place to interact with your feed, clean out the spam tweeps, follow back the real people, etc.

 

Step Nine – Use what you Learn

Use your curation is as the basis for your own blogs

Not regurgitation, but rather letting your new-found knowledge fuel your next post. Or, add to the list of blog ideas you have on a running list somewhere.

 

Setting aside this 45 minutes a day to get the most relevant pieces of content your industry has to offer can not only fill your feeds, but it can also fuel your entire day. And it should, because you should be talking about the latest things in your industry.

 

Great ideas by Amie Marse - http://bit.ly/HfET6B ;


Via maxOz, janlgordon
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Matmi's comment, April 5, 2012 8:16 AM
Some great tips. Would you also spend the time commenting on the curated posts? I know there are some who believe that it is a necessity and others who feel there is no need as you are merely helping others to filter the noise. I try to mix it up depending on time available.
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Make Your Audience Your Newsroom: Civicboom

Make Your Audience Your Newsroom: Civicboom | Communication design | Scoop.it

"Civicboom is an online platform designed to facilitate content-driven organizations and individuals to work together in generating rich media content.

 

Content-seekers can place a request for specific content. Then, by using the Civicboom mobile app (Android), or by uploading to the plug & go site, a content-creator can respond with rich-media directly to that request.

 

All incoming rich-media content is then managed by the content-seeker, and directed to a customizable plugin to be embedded on a website."

Read more about it here: http://thenextweb.com/media/2011/11/12/civicboom-this-open-platform-lets-organizations-request-content-from-their-audience/

 

Sign-up here:  https://www.civicboom.com/

 


Via Robin Good, janlgordon
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janlgordon's comment, November 15, 2011 4:28 PM
This is great Robin!
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The Future of Journalism

The Future of Journalism | Communication design | Scoop.it

I selected this piece by Ross Dawson for The Future of Journalism blog. Ross is one of my trusted sources and he continues to shed light on the future of journalism.

 

My commentary:

 

I see clear parallels between journalists and content curators and believe these are at least partly demonstrated by the points I have chosen to quote and particularly the smaller portions I bolded. I look forward to clear and growing collaborations . We have much to learn from each other.

 

Ross also points out the trend towards personalized and local news delivery and suggests that journalists will need to understand how social curation works. And for me, this is the key to the overlap between the established profession of journalism and the still developing discipline of content curation.

 

Ross sets the tone by stating:

 

"There are eight aspects of news that its audience will value, be prepared to pay for, and that will provide a viable financial foundation for quality journalism in the emerging media environment."

 

The article delves into each of these.  Here's what particularly caught my attention.

 

**Timeliness is becoming ever-more important in a world ravenous for immediacy.

 

**Investigative reporting will retain a central role in society. Increasingly this will involve data analysis, and often harnessing information and insights provided by many citizens.

 

**Insight, through adding context, analysis, and synthesis to news, is where some of the greatest value lies, particularly in business and political journalism.

 

**Those who can provide this insight, be they domain experts or journalists with the requisite breadth of experience, will always have a bright future.

 

**The skills required to present information, ideas and data in a visual and highly aesthetic format will shift far closer to the heart of what it is to be a journalist.

 

Curated by Jan Gordon covering "Content Curation, Social Media and Beyond"

 

Read full article here: [http://bit.ly/zn9rpM]


Via janlgordon
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nuphero's comment, March 2, 2012 6:32 AM
Hi there

When I go to full article link, the site says it must provide account and password to login. Does this content commercial or this site is private?

Thanks you.
janlgordon's comment, March 2, 2012 11:36 AM
Nuphero
Hi There, I just checked this link and it's something new, it wasn't like this before. I'll try to find you another link. You might also google I tried to get it on Google and it comes up the same way. So sorry, about this. Will have to check into this and see what's going on......
nuphero's comment, March 3, 2012 1:26 PM
Hi janlgordon

Thanks for your respond. After some tricks with Google, thanks to some keywords of your curated version, I now can read the original post. So don't worry
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Twitter (Trust) research: It's Where the Money & Action is

Twitter (Trust) research: It's Where the Money & Action is | Communication design | Scoop.it

Bob Brown of Network World has curated news of two very interesting Twitter research projects that caught my attention.


We all agree that freedom of speech is good,  and it's great that everyone can now  become a publisher. However, there's a double-edged sword: If we speak to a friend before we think something though, all will surely be forgiven and forgotten. After all, we all make mistakes. But if you click that Tweet or Share button too quickly, either succumbing to knee-jerk reactions or without first checking the facts, you may find the digital world to be less forgiving.


Content curators have to be especially vigilent about curating someone else's content to make sure the facts and information are correct.


I believe the research related to here is essential reading, as it is furtherment of an established and growing trend:


One relates to Wellesley College's Department of Computer Science where two professors have been awarded a near half million dollar National Science Foundation grant to:


****build an application that gauges the trustworthiness of information shared on social networks, and in particular Twitter.


This was originally envisioned as a form of spammer identification, but


****has broadened to be able to determine the past history of a tweeter and also whether information being received is available from multiple sources. 


The other brings us news of 'Tweetographer', a huge Data Mining project by two University of Cincinatti Computer Science students, descibed as:


"a real-time events guide extracted from information coming via large numbers of tweets." 


This could be available as a web or mobile app at the end of the year and one of the co-creators, Billy Clifton (his partner is Alex Padgett)


**sees the uses expanding in the future to predict election results and compiling product reviews.


My takeaways are:


**that we all need to be very aware that what we tweet today can and may be used against us in the future


**search is still very much in its infancy when it comes to engine sophistication, stay tuned.


Curated by Jan Gordon covering "Content Curation, Social Media & Beyond"


Read full article here: [http://bit.ly/s00504]


Via janlgordon
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