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AUSTERITY & OPPRESSION SUPPORTERS  VS THE PROGRESSION Of The REST OF US
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Rescooped by Monica S Mcfeeters from Just Story It Biz Storytelling
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Stop Imposing Your Brand Story On Your Audience!

Stop Imposing Your Brand Story On Your Audience! | AUSTERITY & OPPRESSION SUPPORTERS  VS THE PROGRESSION Of The REST OF US | Scoop.it
Oh boy, oh boy, oh boy. So you have hit upon an idea – A Killer Idea – one you want to share with others and let others seek guidance from it.

 

To help us with our biz stories -- or stories to launch a product or service -- my colleague Raf Stevens has written this terrific post.

 

This article helps us put flesh to the bones from the ideas presented in the earlier article on using stories when launching a product or service: http://www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it/p/3126539298/to-successfully-launch-a-product-you-have-to-tell-a-compelling-story ;

 

What to take away from this article? Stop using stories to blast your message and start crafting your biz stories from the life of your customer or prospect.

 

Raf includes great examples and clear thinking about this so go read his piece so you can start crafting real and emotionally engaging business stories to tell.

 

This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it ;


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Tell Me a Story -- 8 Tips for Powerful Narratives That Drive Social Impact

Tell Me a Story -- 8 Tips for Powerful Narratives That Drive Social Impact | AUSTERITY & OPPRESSION SUPPORTERS  VS THE PROGRESSION Of The REST OF US | Scoop.it

Recently, everywhere I go, people ask me how to tell a more effective story. Advocates, colleagues, and clients observe that the organizations that achieve policy goals, get transformative grants, or seize the market’s interest are the ones that 1) have the resources to disseminate their story, and 2) just tell the better story. I would argue that the real winners are the organizations that actually manage to tell a story at all.

 

What a great article by Eric Friedenwald-Fishman for Stanford Social Innovation Review.

 

I like that he immediately identifies that many organizations, when they think they are telling a story, actually are not. So so true.

 

I also like that he mentions that organizations who do manage to tell a story well, also spend the resources needed to disseminate it. Too many businesses forget this essential piece.

 

The 8 tips he shares that create a powerful story that moves people to action are solid. What is unique is his tip The Power of the People -- where he advocates "Amplifying the voices of the people most affected by an issue increases the story’s authenticity and relevance. Including quotes, testimonials, eyewitness accounts, and personal narrative makes the story more interesting."  This point is often unrecognized in org story circles.

 

All in all, I like how Eric languages these tips -- many will be familiar to you, but hearing them in a new way always opens our minds to new insights or ideas.

 

In the end, the author asks how to put these tips to good use. He offers 4 questions to get us started that again, are different than what you typically read.

 

Enjoy this piece!

 

This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it ;


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How To Tell A Story -- Story Wars 10 Simple Strategies

This is a Change This PDF that you can view here:

http://changethis.com/manifesto/98.01.StoryWars/pdf/98.01.StoryWars.pdf ;

 

I'm curating this because I like it and I don't like it -- and it is worth taking a look at the assumptions going on in this piece so we can get really smart.

 

This piece was put together by Jonathan Sachs, author of Winning The Story Wars. Sachs comes from the world of marketing and branding and this is reflected in his point of view.

 

Let's get what I don't like out of the way so I can chat about what I do like. Here is what puts my teeth on edge:


1. Sachs states that "we live in a world that has lost its connection to traditional myths and we are now trying to find new ones..." Welllllllll, if your slice of reality is the Hollywood, advertising, and branding world it is easy to get sucked into this notion. But we know from Jung, other psychologists, Folklorists, Anthroplogists, and neuroscience how this is not true. There is great irony in this "myth" that Sachs is perpetuating.


2. We are engaged in a war. Hmmmmm. Well, for millenium people have wanted to gain the attention of other people -- so nothing new there. Is this a war?  Could be. But if we are wanting to employ the power of storytelling to find solutions and create change as Sachs advocates, then war does not speak to the greater good but instead speaks to winners and losers where ongoing resentment is inherently built in. That sounds like the perpetuation of war -- same old same old. 

 

3. Sach's relationship to storytelling is still at the transactional level -- I'll tell you a story and you'll do what I want. While what he really wants it seems is storytelling at the transformational level. That requires a different mind-set and different story skills -- deep listening, engagement, story sharing, etc. And he completely ignores the relational level of storytelling.


4. Reliance on the Hero's Journey as the only story archetype to follow. Well, that's a narrow slice of reality and one geared towards youth. Yet other story archetypes are desperately needed: King/Queen, Trickster, Magician for example in order to affect change.

 

5. As a result, his 10 simple strategies stay at the transactional level with a few geared towards transformation (figure out what you stand for, declare your moral, reveal the moral). Now any great professional storyteller will tell you these that I've mentioned are essential for any compelling storytelling session. So they land in both worlds of transactional and transformational storytelling.


OK -- on to what I do like!


If you want to be heard, you'd better learn to tell better stories. The solutions to our significant problems these days depends on our ability to tell great stories and inspire people to think differently. Storytelling does not take long to learn, but it does take a lifetime to master, Know what a story is and is not Our abilitiy to disseminate stories is greater now than in the past -- because of technology. That is just a reminder to expend your use of different channels in sharing your stories that are now available to us.

 

Enough! Go read this piece yourself and decide what you think about it. It's a quick read.

 

This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it ;


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Meri Walker's comment, September 20, 2012 1:15 PM
Well, Karen! You made my day offering this terrific new Scoop. I'm enriched by the way you think, Karen. Especially about story... I guess we get really "bent" in a certain way by anthropological training and it's still pretty rare to find others who are looking through the kinds of filters you and I have installed in Mind. De-light-ful learning with and from you!
Jane Dunnewold's comment, April 8, 2013 4:42 PM
I'm behind the curve on this one, being new to scoop it - but as a teacher/artist I have to agree with your observation that delving into other archetypes would present rich opportunities to "language" storytelling in lots of environments. I use archetypes to get at the fears and struggles artists face in my workshops - and they aren't all about the hero's path! The Damsel in Distress is one that comes to mind...
Karen Dietz's comment, April 8, 2013 4:56 PM
I agree Jane. Archetypes can be so helpful in many ways. One of the ones I love for artists is the Trickster archetype, and the Magician. LOL on the 'damsel in distress'! Time to go put my 'big girl' panties on and deal with the next challenge :)