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Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading
An Educator's Reading List of Contemporary Literature, Literacy, and Reading Issues. Visit us at http://www.GoogleLitTrips.org
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A Periodic Table Of Storytelling Tropes

A Periodic Table Of Storytelling Tropes | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
You probably won't recognize these storytelling elements from creative writing class.
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:

13 February 2014

 

This is very interesting! Designed to give an entirely fresh approach to creating a story from the elements of good story telling. It's default value is as a tool for writers. (I love the cross-curricular homage to chemistry!)

 

But, it occurred to me that it might also serve as a great tool for pressing literary analysis in classrooms via a sort of reverse engineering process in any variation of the following scenario. What if in small reading circles where 2-3 students were reading the same "free reading" title and in their small group discussions they "reverse engineer" the story. 

 

Might be not only amusing but quite engaging.

 

I'd probably create a color print out for each group and have them highlight the elements of their story, perhaps paste a copy of the book cover in the white space at the top and then hang it on the wall.

 

Wouldn't it be cool to see very different titles all with pictures of the associated book cover and the array of highlights.

 

I might even follow this after several completed projects with an exploration for which stories might be "genetically related."

 

 ~ wwwl.GoogleLitTrips.com ~

brought to you by GLT Global ED, a 501c3 tax-exempt educational nonprofit

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The Things Librarians Find in Books

The Things Librarians Find in Books | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
I don't want to remain untouched by a book. Why should the book want to remain untouched by me?
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:

1 February 2014

Yeah! Yeah! We've all heard about "thinking outside the box," a phrase so overused that too many now proudly use the phrase as though the phrase itself was their own stroke of outside the box thinking  and apply it lavishing to their own collection of inane parrotings.

 

So, maybe I'm the first to suggest, probably not, that this article is actually a welcome and thought provoking alternate take on what books are about.

 

Here's the comment I left at the end of the article (Don't hate me)...

 

"Love it!  


My new mantra! Let's hear in for "Thinking inside the book!"

 

As a teacher I used to provide my students with packets of the smallest multi-colored post-its so the could "write in the book AND at the same time bookmark the passages of particular meaning to them. Then I'd tell them to either remove them after they'd written their final paper. I'd also encourage them to consider writing in the book and then "losing it." But, I'd  also remind them (encourage them) that they would not be allowed to march in the graduation ceremony if they hadn't paid for lost books.

 

And, when I pointed out that there might be a relevant lesson to learn about love in The Velveteen Rabbit, I always got several grins from kids who just seemed to have issues not losing their books until the day I collected books; and they always handed me an envelope with the exact change in it to cover their "irresponsible act,"  lower their eyes and say "sorry." Then they'd raise their eyes, smile and wink at me. And, I'd simply put on a stern face, say, "I hope you've learned your lesson," smile and wink back.

 

 ~ www.GoogleLitTrips.com ~

brought to you by GLT Global ED a 501C3 tax-exempt educational nonprofit

 

 

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Google Lit Trips NEWS!

Google Lit Trips NEWS! | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:

30 January 2014

We're making changes at Google Lit Trips.

 

Same all volunteer crew. But, in light of our recent approval for nonprofit status, we're making some changes.

 

First, we're transitioning to a new look. You might notice that we've changed the home page to include our new catch phrase "Reading the WOR(L)D." Kind of clever when you notice the color scheme.

 

We're emphasizing the fact that Google Lit Trips is brought to you by GLT Global ED the official name of the nonprofit corporation.

 

You'll also notice that in addition to the Amazon Referral fees we get when people use any of the Amazon links on the site to do some shopping, we now have a DONATE button on several pages. And all donations will come with a receipt that documents a tax-deductible donation for state and federal income taxes in the United States.

 

And we're running through just about all of the existing Lit Trips to update and refresh them adding new media, adding links to report any broken links, and branding them with the new logo.

 

Just this month we've published updates to the Lit Trips for:

 • Pedro's Journey by Pam Conrad

 • Are We There Yet by Alison Lester

 • Sam Patch, Daredevil Jumper by Julie Cummins

 • Hana's Suitcase by Karen Levine

 • Marching for Freedom by Elizabeth Partridge.

and

 • If you didn't catch it, the long awaited refresh for Make Way for Ducklings by Robert McCloskey was published at the end of December.

 

And, we've published a brand new Lit Trip for The Diary of a Young Girl by Anne Frank.

 

We've also updated three of our most popular Step-Guides. These are the following:

"GLT Getting Started v4" designed for those new to the Google Lit Trips resources

"So How Do I Get Started v2" designed for those wanting some guidance on building Lit Trips

and "Basic Text Formatting v2" designed to share the basics of formatting text in the popup windows to enhance readability.<

 

We' have lots of plans including the development of individual Teachers Guides covering each Lit Trips entire content, suggestions for a variety of implementation strategies, Alignment guides for English Language Arts Common Core State Standards with attention to Reading Literature, Informational Reading, and Writing. As well as alignment guides for the International Society for Technology in Education Technology Standards for both teachers and students.

 

Oh there's more, but stay tuned!

 

And, remember we intend to stay true to our vision of making our resources free to educators and students. Though donations are not required, they are quite welcome. And we promise that 100% of donations will go towards the development of new resources AND that we'll continue to operate as a 100% volunteer organization for the forseeable future.

 

~ http://www.GoogleLitTrips.com 

brought to you by GLT Global ED a 501c3 tax-exempt educational nonprofit.

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Google for Education

Google for Education | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it

"We're excited to share the release of our new Google for Education Learning Center to support the training and professional development of teachers globally.  

 

GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:

28 January 2014

 

Today Google announced an entirely new "Google for Education" website, complete with extensive support for Google Apps tools, information about programs, lots of training resources, Stories and news specific to Google tools in Education.

 

Very proud to have discovered the image above from the Google Lit Trip for The Grapes of Wrath used to introduce one of the training videos in the  Google Maps for Education tutorials area.

 

 ~ www.GoogleLitTrips.com ~

brought to you by GLT Global ED (dba Google Lit Trips) a 501c3 tax-exempt educational nonprofit

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Ken Zimmerman's curator insight, January 29, 4:52 AM

Check out this new Google for Education resource page!

Bodil Hernesvold's curator insight, January 29, 7:32 AM

Ingen vei utenom Google, vel. Dette er noe jeg må se nærmere på hva

Carol Rine's curator insight, January 29, 10:20 AM

Google for Education Learning Center! And the magnificent Google LitTrips. #fetc #edtech #DIYLearning.

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Are E-Books Killing Reading For Fun?

Are E-Books Killing Reading For Fun? | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
Americans are reading differently than they used to.
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:

25 January 2014

 

Generally speaking NPR is one of my "GO TO" resources for reliable  information about "anything." So when I saw this headline in my daily search for scoopable online content, I was intrigued. 

 

Though the PEW Research Center report referenced is a pretty serious and deep and somewhat encouraging report  (see: http://pewinternet.org/Reports/2014/E-Reading-Update/Overview.aspx) this six-minute audio seemed to cover the surface, but "failed to support the headline." It did not focus upon the implication of the headline that E-Books ARE killing reading for fun.

 

Actually, I'm trying to be a bit snarky here. The audio is worth listening to. It's the headline that bothers me. We all know that we often scan headlines looking for intriguing articles to read. Some do not create enough traction for us to consider reading, others get us to start but not finish reading, and still others get us to the article that is so intriguing that we read with attentive interest to the end.

 

This morning in my scan for articles, my eye was caught by several headlines and I began to wonder about headlines themselves.

 

A few examples, you can Google them all if any of the tiltes intrigue you...

 

BUT BEFORE you start Googling the titles, Try this.

1. Read the entire list of titles FIRST

2. Being mindful of your own initial reaction to the titles, review the titles and decide which you believe

 - will be articles promoting reading and which will be critical of reading.

 - which will support opinions you already hold and which will challenge your existing opinions

- which you will actually consider Googling so you can read them and which don't even create sufficient curiousity to read

- and finally (rhetorically) which will implant some sense that there really is evidence to support your opinions that you won't read but sub-consciously incorporate as proof that your opinion is justified by some authoritative expertise.

 

THEN read as you wish and when finished, which headlines planted biased opinions that might be dangerous if the article is not read at all or not read attentively. (Was the article WHETHER YOU AGREED WITH IT OR NOT reliant upon cherry-picking the evidence it relied upon for its conclusions? Did the article adequately address any counter-evidence WHETHER YOU AGREED WITH IT OR NOT?)

 

Well, as are all of my "commentary assignments" you may consider them only rhetorical. But, here's the list...

 

 

"Most American adults read a print book in the past year, even as e-reading continues to grow"

"Kids Aren't reading On Tablets"

"The Top 10 Books on Apple's iBooks"

 

"Book-crazy boy, 5, a budding literary critic"

 

"A brief guide to faking your way through literary classics when you haven't actually read them"

"Getting Rid of Books, Making Space for Life"

"Reading Books Is Fundamental"

 

"9 Video Games Based On Classic Literature"

 

"BEHIND TWO GOOD MOVIES, TWO GREAT BOOKS"

 

"CODE IS NOT LITERATURE"

 

"Why It's Important to Keep Reading Books By People Even If They're Monsters"

 

"Is American literature 'massively overrated"?

 

"Fla. Board of Ed weighs changes to Common Core"

 

"5 Questions To Evaluate Curriculum For Rigor"

 

"Holding Teachers Accountable For Decisions They Aren't Allowed to Make"

 

"The Peculiar Underworld of Rare-Book Thieves"

 

 

 

 ~ www.GoogleLitTrips.com ~

by GLT GLobal ED (dba Google Lit Trips) a 501c3 tax-exempt educational non profit encouraging learners to "READ THE WOR(L)D"

 

 

 

 

 

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Marching for Freedom by Elizabeth Partridge

Marching for Freedom by Elizabeth Partridge | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:

23 January 2014

Proud to announce an update to the Marching for Freedom Google Lit Trip. This was the first author collaboration ever in the Google Lit Trips project. 

 

For those exploring Black History and wanting to address Common Core State Standards for Informational Reading, this update includes many links to incredible background reading about the Civil Rights Movement and the march from Selma to Montgomery Alabama.

 

You can read an interesting article entiltled, "Google Lit Trips: Celebrating Martin Luther King jr, Day" at: http://sco.lt/5E0YSH ;

 

The artilce gives extensive attention to this particular Google Lit Trip.

 

 ~ www.GoogleLitTrips.com ~

Google Lit Trips is the official fictitious business name for GLT Global ED, a 501c3 tax-exempt educational nonprofit

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Sweet Integrations

Sweet Integrations | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it

"I used the Lit Trip Big Anthony: His Story so the students could visit the different places in Italy as Big Anthony struggled to find his Strega Nona. The students loved this activity. The students developed a more personal connection with the book."

GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:

14 January 2014

 

It's always so nice to see blog posts that endorse the Google Lit Trips project, particularly when they include references  to the student engagement.

 

 

 ~ www.GoogleLitTrips.com ~

Google Lit Trips is a legal business name for GLT Global ED, a 501c3 tax-exempt educational nonprofit

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Is there a point in getting an English literature degree? What are the job prospects?

Is there a point in getting an English literature degree? What are the job prospects? | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
Answer (1 of 4): Studying at University level to gain a degree is not, contrary to the expectations of many in government, all about getting trained to do a job.
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:

9 January 2014

 

Assuming you might be an English teacher, how would YOU respond to this question?

How do you think other members of your English Department would respond to this question?

And, how do you think members of your Math, Science, Art, Physical Education, History, and every other department on your campus might respond?

 

I didn't have an issue with the first question? Is there a point in getting an English literature degree? We all know that we need English majors to carry on the important and too often undervalued task of being the primary curricular area where students focus upon not only the scholarly side of literature, but also upon the civilizing influence that reading great literature can bring to the development of one's moral compass regardless of one's career pursuits. 

 

And, that leads me to my concern about the second question, proposed in headline as though it were a fair restatement of the first question. 

 

If the determination of whether or not an English literature degree is worthwhile based solely upon whether or not it positions one well for getting a job, then the implication is that if the answer to the second question is "not very good," then the answer to the first question must be "NO!" By suggesting that the only criteria for choosing a major is that major's job prospects, the implication is that other criteria ought  to be summarily dismissed. 

 

And to assume that pleasure or escape are the only other possible values of literature as a field of study is insulting (or should I say ignorant, short-sighted, naive, or perhaps proof that an informed AND ALSO CIVIL society depends much more upon the civilizing effects that literary themes address than we give it credit for?)

 

Without demeaning the importance of career preparation or information literacy where knowing right answers is profitable; montetarily or  otherwise, I would suggest that Literature more than is the case in most other curricular areas specializes in the equally profitable goal of encouraging students to know the right questions?

 

You know questions like, "Should I take this job offer with an incredible salary if it requires me to use my graphic artist skills to create advertisements for cigarette companies? Should I buy a Hummer for the wonderful testosterone rush and not worry about energy sustainability because, "Hey, I can afford the price of gas no matter how high it gets?"

 

The value of literary study has more to do with the questions for which there are no easy right or wrong answers.

 

If you were to respond to this article asking for your thoughts on whether or not there is a point to getting an English literature degree? (Forget the bias slant of the follow up question) what would you say? Which of the previous responses would you agree with? And, even more challenging, which of the responses that you are not fond of still provide you with reasons to pause and reconsider your own thougths?

 

 ~ www.GoogleLitTrips.org ~

Google Lit Trips is the fictitious business name for GLT Global ED, a 501c3 tax-exempt educational nonprofit

 

 

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Caperucita Feroz's curator insight, January 10, 2:44 AM

What do you think? Is it useful?

malek's comment, January 13, 5:57 AM
controversial..at least
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FRHS Lit Trips

students at FRHS use Google Lit Trips
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:

7 January 2013

 

Always honored to see the extent to which the Google Lit Trips concepts are being used in classes.

 

I particularly like this one because it makes very clear connections between Google Lit Trips  and Common Core State Standards expectations.

 

 ~ www.GoogleLitTrips.com ~

Google Lit Trips is the fictitious business name of GLT Global ED, a 501c3 tax-exempt educational nonprofit ~

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BOOK RIOT - Always books. Never boring.

BOOK RIOT - Always books. Never boring. | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it

"While we at the Riot take some time off to rest and catch up on our reading, we’re re-running some of our favorite posts from the last several months. Enjoy our highlight reel, and we’ll be back with new stuff on Monday, January 6th"

GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:

28 December 2013
I've counted on Book Riot to provide thought-provoking articles dedicated to finding interesting and intriguing takes on Reading About Reading

And, as they take a holiday respite, they've taken the opportunity to "re-post" some of their favorite posts; the Cremé; de la Cremé so to speak.

Rather than commenting upon them individually, I'll just tease you with a quick list of some of the titles. I know many of you are enjoying the last days of your winter breaks, but as that day approaches, I also know that many of you will turn your attention towards a  growing excitement about getting back to working with your students.

 

It might be quite worth the time to ramp up your enthusiasm by sampling a few of the following posts. The titles alone should give you an idea of how intriguingly engaging the Book Riot posts typically are!

 

Life Lessons from Winnie the Pooh

Not All People Who Read Books Are Book People

30 One-Sentence Lessons from Literature

3 Steps to Reading Harder, Better, Faster, Stronger

Reading Outside Your Comfort Zone

Let’s Put James Franco on All the Book Covers!

QUIZ: Guess These Books by Their Catalog Cards

A Guide to Neil Gaiman for Kids!

A Beginner’s Guide to Oscar Wilde

Lost and Bound: Adventures in Found Books 

 

Google Lit Trips is the legal fictitious business name for GLT Global ED, a 501c3 tax-exempt educational nonprofit

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7 Delightful Forgotten English Words

7 Delightful Forgotten English Words | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
If you're looking to boost your Scrabble game or make your friends feel like blunkerkins, you might want to check out The Horologicon, language- obsessed blogger Mark Forsyth's witty compendium of words long forgotten by most speakers of English.
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:

15 December 2013

Amusing though short list of lost words. I can think of three words on the list that ought to be more popular than ever!

 

~ www.GoogleLitTrips.com ~

Google Lit Trips is the legal fictitious business name of GLT Global ED, a 501c3 tax-exempt educational nonprofit

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Patty Kennedy's curator insight, January 3, 7:53 AM

This is excellent.   I can completely see a use for words #1, #3 & #6.  :)

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9 Movies You Didn't Know Were Based On Shakespeare Stories

9 Movies You Didn't Know Were Based On Shakespeare Stories | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
John Madden's "Shakespeare in Love" was released on Dec. 11, 1998.
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:

12 December 2013

What is literary reading's value if it is not perceived to be relevant by those whose zones of proximal development we've been entrusted to nourish?

 

There are reasons why Shakespeare is still relevant. And, most English majors/English teachers have, over the trajectories of their lives come to know that Shakespeare is relevant. 

 

But, "relevance" only becomes relevant once the "Ah Ha"ppens. 

<<ASIDE: Okay, I don't know if "Ah Ha"ppens works. But I am stuck with a mind that comes up with stuff like that>>

 

How might these parallel versions of the classics be embraced as resources as we encourage students to "discover" the relevance of Shakespeare? 

 

If we teach Shakespeare (or any author) as if the goal was to deify the author rather than to encourage discovery of relevance then we may be missing the target more often than hitting the bullseye. 

 

There is an indescribable joy when we "discover for ourselves" the significance of the great themes. 

 

And there is great frustration when we "just don't get" what someone else is so excited about. 

 

Whether we acknowledge it when asked or conveyed indirectly via body language, the truth is that many of our students let us know that they are not really as engaged as we'd like to believe they are. The message we may or may not be aware of is...

 

"What's this old story got to do with anything I care about?"

 

or the more receptive...

"What's this old story got to do with anything I should care about?"

 

It's that "opportunity space" between "not caring yet" and "actually caring." 

 

These Hollywood adaptations may be just the bridge between the "why should I care?" and the personal realization that "I really ought to care" moment.

 

I'm convinced that we can not tell others to care, but we can create an opportunity for them to experience the discovery of something worth caring about that had not been cared about before. 

 

It's some sort of choreography, some sort of "designing the sequence of events," that make up a learning experience in which the student is the discoverer of relevance rather than the note taker who either does or doesn't really care about passing the test.

 

So when do we do our end zone dance?

 

When they send the message "I know this one!" or when they send the message "I Get it!"

 

"Ah Ha"ppiness Happens!

 

 ~ www.GoogleLitTrips.com ~

Google Lit Trips is the legal fictitious business name for GLT Global ED, a 501c3 tax-exempt educational nonprofit

 

 

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10 Children's Books You Didn't Know Were Racist

10 Children's Books You Didn't Know Were Racist Maybe these aren't the best books to teach your child to read with, check out why in 10 surprisingly racist c...
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:

10 December 2013

I seriously debated whether or not I would scoop this video. I certainly do not want to endorse any literature that even remotely promotes racism. And this is particularly true in the case of "Children's Books."

 

I won't defend any of the stories because my recollection of them is vague at best. The evidence condemning them in 17.3 seconds certainly doesn't paint them in a good light. 

 

Truthfully, I really have only limited recollection of most of the stories condemned. I remember "Little Black Sambo" and even the Sambos Restaurants that eventually closed because the restaurant, though actually named after founders SAM Battistone, Sr. and Newell BOhnett, chose to emphasize the assumed relationship to the story in their decor decisions. The book did seem racist to me as I recall. Though, I won't defend the story, I did Google it and discovered a complete copy of the book on Project Guttenberg and came to realize that I had not really remembered the story so much as the controversy. I don't think as  a child that I ever realized that the story was set in India not Africa. Nor did I recall that Sambo was a victim throughout the story.

 

 

But, I will come to the defense of The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. And, in doing so I hope to at least suggest that there may well be a variation of racism in the form of stereotyping via cherry picking evidence in the video maker's .17.3 second condemnations that do a great disservice to at least one of the titles if not many of those mentioned in the video.

 

My challenge...

How in the world could a video proclaiming The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn to be racist ever generate 1,779,378 views and gather nearly three times as many "thumbs ups" as "thumbs down"?

 

Oh, I know the controversy regarding Huck Finn. It is a story to which I have probably devoted more attention than any other book I've read. For the record, I taught a Mark Twain course for three years. That course evolved into a Satire course that I taught for over 30 years where there was always at least one work by Mark Twain in the syllabus.. I've actually held the hand-written pages of the original manuscript that are housed in the Bancroft Library at the University of California, Berkeley. I've been invited to the Green Room backstage to meet Hal Holbrook after a performance of "Mark Twain Tonight." (Hal Holbrook actually called me at school to let me know he'd arranged for two tickets and personally invited me to come back stage after the performance).

 

But back to, the video...So, I've done a bit of math. the producers of this video condemn 10 famous "Children's Books" in 2 minutes 53 seconds. That means the case against each book averaged 17.3 seconds. Not a lot of time for evidence. And, certainly no time for the defense to present its case.

 

I'll only present a defense of Huckleberry  Finn, a book commonly criticized unfairly as being racist on lists like this one. The criticism is of course based upon Mark Twain's having Huckleberry Finn and many others, use the despicable N-Word way too many times for sensibile readers to ignore.

 

It's pretty easy to hate Pap for using the word. He's clearly an antagonist. But, it does challenge readers' sensibilities and comfort levels when Mark Twain puts those words in Huck's mouth, the character we so much want to consider as the story's primary protagonist.

 

What a position to put the reader in! "We want to like Huck, but how can we if he's a racist?" And, we squirm at the frequency of the word's appearance.

 

I would suggest that at worst Huck was a "racist in training." He WAS A CHILD whose biggest drawback was that he believed his teachers, guardians, preachers, and judges as most children would.

 

The only possible acceptable resolution for the reader's predicament is if The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is actually the story of one boy's coming to realize that what he has been taught was wrong. And, this is exactly what Mark Twain does.

 

The story is actually attacked for TWO reasons. The lesser known criticism is of a scholarly nature. The story is criticized by many for the "much too long" concluding episodes where Tom Sawyer who had NOT YET had the eye-opening experiences regarding the injustices of racial relationships that Huck had had, returns bringing his limited sensibilities about what is okay in terms of childhood play with him. This leads to another excruciating challenge to readers. As Tom thinks nothing of the cruelty of his tormenting Jim we just don't find Tom all that amusing as he was in his own book.And, after awhile, because the torment goes on for so long, readers become quite anxious for a happy ending that does not come as quickly as we'd like. Huck is pretty darned silent during that long and painful-to-read series of unrelentingly cruel ending chapters.The criticism? Why did Mark Twain go on for so long? He could have ended the story much sooner!"

 

Could he have? Really? Why relieve the reader quickly? Why not drive the point home to Huck AND to the readers that there are reasons why we need to stare at serious social issues squarely in the face and face whatever our own responsibilities my be as participants in those injustices?

 

Mark Twain has accomplished a remarkable feat in that criticized ending. He forces us to accept a not very satisfying "happy ending." We're happy to see that Huck gets fed up with Tom and when the time comes to go home again he can't. 

 

It's happy on one hand as Huck ends the story...

 

"I got to light out for the Territory ahead of the rest because Aunt Sally she's going to adopt me and sivilize me and I can't stand it. I been there before."

 

If "sivilized" people act the way Huck has come to understand their parameters of civilized behavior. He chooses not to return as a participant.

 

YEAH! we can love Huck and forgive him his trespasses.

 

But, Mark Twain also withholds the most important element required by stories that readers want to believe end "happily ever after." Huck may be off in hopes of finding a better place, but those he leaves behind are left where they are and have always been and history has shown were to be slow in coming to the same realizations that Huck has come to. Mark Twain offers little indication that Aunt Sally or Tom or so many of the others whose behaviors we found despicable had learned any lessons worthy of contemplation of self-righteous doubt.. Well, there is one glimmer of hope. Old Miss Watson does set Jim free as a result of her shame resulting from her nearly choosing to cash in on Jim by selling him down the river.

 

But, of course, Twain kills her off too. 

 

The second and far more common reason that The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is attacked is of course, the extreme irritation caused by the use of the N-word.

 

Unfortunately, too many defenders of the book address this by suggesting that the N-word was a common word in those days so we have to "excuse" Huck for using it.

 

NO we don't have to excuse Huck unless we base that excuse upon his childhood naivete. The word was not an acceptable term in those days by thinking people. It was an intended irritant to the sensibilities of readers of the day and a constant irritant even today as it reminds us that racism is still rampant among large elements of our society.

i.e.,

All Muslims are _______.

All Mexicans are _______..

All gays are _________.

All Jews are ________.

All Liberals are _________.

All Conservatives are ________.

All blondes are _________.

 

Let's not kid ourselves. Mark Twain put it in our faces. Stereotyping is the seed of racism, sexism, and Xenophobia.

 

Huck Finn was the bravest writing Mark Twain had done at the time. 

 

One of the finest presentations I've ever seen was made by Jocelyn Chadwick, a Harvard Graduate School of Education assistant professor and Twain scholar who authored, "The Jim Dilemma: Reading Race in the Adventures of Huckleberry Finn."

 

A must read article for anyone who teaches The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn AND for anyone who criticizes the teaching of The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is this article published in the Harvard University Gazette by Alvin Powell.. (http://news.harvard.edu/gazette/2000/09.28/huckfinn.html)

 

The article begins...

_______________

"Mark Twain knew darn well what he was doing when he wrote "The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn": he was pokin' at a beehive.

 

And for more than one hundred years, the bees have obliged, swarming out with criticism of the tale of the friendship between a poor white boy, Huckleberry Finn, and an escaped slave, Jim."

______________

 

According to Chadwick,  "Twain's writings stopped being just stories and began to reflect his social conscience."

 

They weren't necessarily racist before Huck Finn. One need only take a close look at the shift in Mark Twain's focus between the publishing of Tom Sawyer and Huckleberry Finn. In the earlier works the focus was upon children's antics and not on the deeper themes that he introduced in The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. 

 

One can not read The Prince and the Pauper or Pudd'nhead Wilson parallel books to see Twain's focus upon issues of social conscience. The first focuses upon the inequality of the rich and the poor; the later upon the inequality between whites and blacks both sharing the basic plot structure of having one character from each side wind up swapping places with the other to see how the other group lives.

 

Read The Mysterious Stranger, Letters From Earth, and The War Prayer and then make a case that Mark Twain was a racist.

 

As the maker of this video relies on cherry-picked evidence and does not bother to consider overwhelming evidence to the contrary, at least in the case of The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, and I suspect in the cases of the other books he condemns in 17.3 seconds or less. He or she or they are ironically guilty of the same stereotyping and maligning as he, she, or they condemn the stories as being.

 

__

AN AFTERWORD.

So why isn't there a Google Lit Trip for The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn? 

It is a notoriously difficult story for identifying specific locations other than a very few obvious ones.

 

BUT, I'm happy to announce that the Google Lit Trip IS underdevelopment nevertheless. I don't know how soon it will be ready, but there will be an announcement right here as soon as it is.

 

 ~ www.GoogleLitTrips.com ~

Google Lit Trips is the legal fictitious business name for GLT Global ED, a 501c3 tax exempt educational nonprofit.

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How Common Core Devalues Great Literature | Crisis Magazine

How Common Core Devalues Great Literature | Crisis Magazine | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
Many years ago, a prominent man wrote to one of his favorite authors about his latest book.  This man had been a soldier, a hunter, an athlete, an historian, and a social reformer, and was now employed in a post
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:

10 February 2014

A careful reading of my comments regarding Common Core State Standards for Reading Literature WILL reveal both concerns and  appreciation for their intent. In other areas of the CCSS the teeter-totter tips more towards an appreciation for efforts to assess  and hold accountable both the skill sets of students and teachers than it does in the area of reading literature. 

 

There are areas of English Language Arts for which the development of valid  assessment tools with acceptable margins of error is possible. Mechanics, Usage and Grammar  (MUG), vocabulary, decoding, and advanced literacy skills all have "variables." But, there are generally accepted "ranges" of best practices for these and other skill sets. Many are useful in both Informational Reading as well as in Reading Literature. However, if we distinguish between the intent of Informational Reading and the intent of Reading Literature, it becomes painfully clear that assessing the former with an acceptable margin of error is infinitely easier than assessing the latter with an acceptable margin of error.

 

Though, personally I take a more moderate view of the negative impact of Common Core upon Reading Literature, this article, emotion-laden as it often is, confronts the proverbial elephant in the room without blinking. 

 

But, perhaps the amplification of the concerns that CCSS might be so misdirecting attention away from the very reason we teach literary reading that it may well be the case that the CCSS may be destroying what we intend to be nourishing; that is the engaged and thoughtful and rewarding pursuit of humankind's most persistent questions. 

 

My moderate response? I'm not ready to throw out the CCSS for Reading Literature. Reading Literature is too important. But, I'm not ready to give up the hope that a recognition that the assessment of Literary Reading as it stands may be doing more harm than good.

 

Perhaps a reminder from Sir Ken Robinson is in order...


"Another problem is that in this country there is a culture of standardized testing based on right or wrong types of answers. However, if you are looking at someone's paintings, reading their poetry, or listening to music, then you are focusing on a whole array of factors. We have a tendency to make the measurable important versus the important measureable..."


Perhaps it's time to wonder whether or not the CCSS Smarter Balance assessment in its current form fails the test of successfully measuring what is actually important in the case of Literary Reading.

 

 

 ~ www.GoogleLitTrips.com

brought to you by GLT Global ED an educational nonprofit

 

 

 

 

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Reading Power's curator insight, February 12, 6:24 PM

The debate continues

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CALL FOR ENTRIES - Innovations in Reading Prize, 2014, National Book Foundation, Presenter of National Book Awards

CALL FOR ENTRIES - Innovations in Reading Prize, 2014, National Book Foundation, Presenter of National Book Awards | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it

The Foundation's Innovations in Reading Prize recognizes exceptional initiatives and programs that have created and sustained a lifelong love of reading: thoughtful, groundbreaking projects that generate excitement and passion for literature and books.

GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:

30 January 2014

 

Apologies for cross posting anywhere there might be some affection for the Google Lit Trips project!)

 

I'm hoping that there are a few fans of Google Lit Trips who might be interested in helping us apply for this $2,500 cash award  from the National Book Foundation by writing a Letter of Recommendation for our efforts.

 

The unique requirements for the award seem to make the Google Lit Trips project a perfect candidate.

 

If you are willing to consider helping us out, I've created a few talking points that I think make the Google Lit Trips project a perfect candidate for the project here: http://www.googlelittrips.com/GoogleLit/Why_Google_Lit_Trips.html ;

 

The application due date is February 19 and we would need to receive a copy of your letter by February 14 if at all possible. 

 

If you are at all considering this request could you send me a note at: JeromeBurg@GLTGlobalED.org  or JeromeBurg@GoogleLitTrips.com so I don't sit around wringing my hands?

 

Thanks!

jerome

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National Book Foundation eNewsletter, January 2014

National Book Foundation eNewsletter, January 2014 | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:

30 January 2014

A GREAT site chock full of videos of speeches, readings, and interviews from National Book Award Week.

 

A Great inspiration to share with students, particularly those who don't have "reading is cool" on their radar yet.

 

 ~ www.GoogleLitTrips.com

 brought to you by GLT Global ED (dba Google Lit Trips) a 501c3 tax-exempt educational nonprofit

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The Peculiar Underworld of Rare-Book Thieves :: Books :: Features :: Paste

The Peculiar Underworld of Rare-Book Thieves :: Books :: Features :: Paste | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
While the criminal personalities vary, rare-book thieves all share something in common: base greed and a knack for gaining insider access to the cozy, exclusive world of rare-book collecting.
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:

25 January 2014

 

Mentioned in my previous scoop, I found this to be one of the more fascinating articles. 

 

How about this for Informational Reading that has a direct bridge to Literary Reading?

 

 ~ www.GoogleLitTrips.com ~

by GLT GLobal ED (dba Google Lit Trips) a 501c3 tax-exempt educational non profit encouraging learners to "READ THE WOR(L)D"

 

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We're Teaching Books That Don't Stack Up

We're Teaching Books That Don't Stack Up | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
All too often it's English teachers who close down teen interest in reading.
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:

24 January 2014

 (This scooped article was orignally published in 2008)

 

Okay, Gulp!

 

I think I'll begin my comments with one of my favorite Dick Cavett quotes....

 

__________

It's a rare person who wants to hear what he doesn't want to hear.

__________

 

There, I said it. Literature teachers, we may just be a big part of the problem, well intended as we may be.

 

If you don't read the scooped article, or finish my brief comments, I'll include one paragragh from the article worthy of some open-minded collegial contemplation in a pending department meeting...

 

__________

""Butchering." That's what one of my former students, a young man who loves creative writing but rarely gets to do any at school, called English class. He was referring to the endless picking apart of linguistic details that loses teens in a haze of "So what?" The reading quizzes that turn, say, "Hamlet" into a Q&A on facts, symbols and themes. The thesis-driven essay assignments that require students to write about a novel they can't muster any passion for ("The Scarlet Letter" is high on teens' list of most dreaded). I'll never forget what one parent, bemoaning his daughter's aversion to great books after she took AP English Literature, wrote to me: "What I've seen teachers do is take living, breathing works of art and transform them into dessicated lab specimens fit for dissection."

__________

 

(awkward pause)

 

 

 

Yes, we do need to sow the seeds of the next crop of English majors. But, we ought to consider it even more important, since the numbers are so lopsided, to remember that as many as 90% of our students "ain't gonna major in English" and perhaps as many as 50% of our students "ain't gonna read a single piece of fiction" after they are no longer required to do so.

 

I know.

 

I don't particularly want to hear it either.  But "facts is facts." And, if there is any truth in the contentions made in this article that in too many cases we may be killing what we believe we are nourishing we may want to revisit even our own personal favorite lessons.

 

I am not proposing that we "dumb down" but rather that we give some thought to how we might "relevance up" what we do in our literary reading instruction. Anyone who can't imagine how to "relevance up" say a play like Cyrano deBergerac, must surely have forgotten what it felt like to have acne or the intensity of the forces of physical attractivenss at a time in one's life when "inner beauty" is just something that teens' parents say is really important while correcting their children's posture.

 

Yes, of course! That's it. Our students don't particularly want to hear what they don't want to hear either. But, we're the grown ups in the room aren't we? 

 

Of course if taken as a blanket condemnation of how we teach literary reading, then it is a harsh and unfair implication to suggest that none of us do manage to successfully engage the vast majority of our students. But, if we are willing to listen and hear what we may not really want to hear, we may give some readjusted attention to the complaints of those who are brave or annoyed enough to express those complaints. And, if we really do want to hear what we really don't want to hear, then we might also spend significant time listening to the eerie silience of those who "lay low" only pretending to care or to those silent ones who don't even bother to pretend to care while wondering why the clock moves so slowly.

 

We can sometimes too easily explain away the complaints and disengaged silence by believing that "they're just lazy, they spend too much time on facebook, they just don't care, that they just want less challenging work." There certainly are those. But a surprising number of the disengaged don't want less; they want "something" more.

 

It was not too long ago that the battle cry was, "No Child Left Behind!" But, I would propose that perhaps an equally important concern is that when we finish with them, that they do not ride off "into the real world" happy to be finally free to leave some of their teachers behind.

 

Teach to their hearts and their minds will follow.

 

 ~ www.GoogleLitTrips.com ~

Google Lit Trips is the fictitious business name for GLT Global ED, a 501c3 tax-exempt educational nonprofit

 

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Shay Davidson's curator insight, January 24, 5:47 PM

Interesting. I'm quite sure people could argue all day about the books kids are forced to read in high school. I only wish that good teachers had a choice in the books they wanted to present to students--and I'd get to pick the good teachers out!

Steffen Sipe's curator insight, January 30, 12:45 AM

sorry....

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Google Lit Trips: Celebrating Martin Luther King, Jr. Day

Google Lit Trips: Celebrating Martin Luther King, Jr. Day | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
“But, how do you know if an ending is truly good for the characters unless you traveled
with them through every page?
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:

22 January 2014

Imagine my surprise when Kristen Pavese, author of this article begins by responding to the quote  above from Shannon Hale's Midnight in Austenland with...

 

__________

"If only the character in Shannon Hale's novel had heard about Google Lit Trips, she would have known that this is in fact, possible!. Google Lit Trips is a free resource that allows readers to virtually follow the journey of literary characters via Google Earth...These pre-created trips place readers inside the story so they can see for themselves the path that characters have followed and experience the sights they have seen. Pop-up windows at each location provide the reader with different resources that stimulate higher level reading skills - discussion starters, links for further information, videos, etc. These resources bring about a fuller understanding of the text while establishing real world connections the reader can learn about for himself."

__________

 

Pavese,  then points to the Google Lit Trip for Elizabeth Partridge's "Marching for Freedom" as an example that might be quite appropriate in light of our remembrance of the life of Martin Luther King jr. 

 

__________

"The site offers a pre-created trip for "Marching for Freedom" by Elizabeth Partridge. Partridge tells the true story of the children who chose to join Dr. King on the march from Selma to Washington during the Civil Rights Movement in 1965. The trip outlines the 5 day march, giving students a visualization of the path the participants took, where they stopped, and what happened on each day. The pop-ups provide videos that make students feel as if they went on the march themselves – including speeches by MLK and LBJ, as well as a video of the actual marching. Among other things, the pop-ups also include links to documents that will give the readers background information (like the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and MLK’s principles of non-violence), discussion questions, and notes from the author."

__________

 

I must say that when Elizabeth Partridge contacted me to suggest that perhaps the book she was about to publish might make a good Lit Trip, I was stunned to say the least. An actual author contacting me?? Wow! The Google Lit Trips project had reached beyond any expectations I'd ever had for the project.

 

And, in collaborating with Elizabeth in the months before the publication of her book, the entire title being, Marching For Freedom: Walk Together Children, and Don't You Grow Weary," I found myself up close and personal with a portion of the Civil Rights story that I had not been deeply aware of although I had been convinced that I had known quite a bit about Civil Rights Movement. 

 

When we stumbled across actual video clips of the march posted on YouTube, I was more than intrigued by the mysterious description of the footage reading...

 

__________

"A powerful and recently rediscovered film made during the 1965 Selma to Montgomery march for voting rights. Stefan Sharff's intimate documentary reflects his youthful work in the montage style under the great Russian filmmaker Sergei Eisenstein. The film features moving spirituals. Marchers include Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and his wife Coretta Scott King."

__________

 

It was nearly impossible for me to believe that in 2009 there was film to be "rediscovered." And then I noticed that the footage had been posted by "YouTube user: BTSharf, the son of the film's director.and one of the film's cameramen. 

 

I contacted  Mr. Sharf: in pursuit of permission to include the footage in the Marching for Freedom Lit Trip. I received this reply...

 

__________

"Re: requesting permission to use videos 09/08/09

You certainly have permission to embed this video. We would appreciate it. This is a document that should be seen, the more traffic the better.

Send me a link.

Billy "

__________

 

As we continued to work on the Marching for Freedom Lit Trip, being able to take the journey of the march and learning more about the "back story" than I had managed to gather even in my own fairly deep following of the actual events in the news, magazines, and television reports at the time of the march, and at the same time learning much more about the Elizabeth Partridge's back story personal journey in researching the "stories behind the story" of the march, it became clearer than ever that creating learning experiences that somehow virtualize the experience of traveling alongside the characters and people in their own life journeys had a way of personalizing the learning  experience that is much more engaging and therefore much more informative than can be acheived when the "story" is reduced to the pages alloted for such historically momentous events in history books, or in newscasts, and magazine articles. 

 

There is a kind of access to the truth of the "character of the characters"  as well as the "character of the people" if we are able to "travel with them" as author Shannon Hale points out in the quote from her book used by Pavese as a starting point for her article.

 

And I realized that whether one is reading fiction, historical fiction or non-fiction, there is a bringing together in the same space of the reader and the events portrayed, that is essentially a virtual travel along. And, this engagement makes it possible to not only "know" the events, but to actually "feel" the events, to empathize with the conditions and motivations and dilemmas of choice faced by the characters and people as if we were there walking right along side them.

 

When Elizabeth and I reached the end of the development of the Marching for Freedom Lit Trip, where we took the reader to "virtually witness" the incredible speech given by Martin Luther King Jr. at the Alabama State Capitol,  only one block beyond Martin Luther King's Dexter Avenue Baptist Church, we found a video clip from that lesser known, speech, but perhaps at least as eloquent, as the "I Have a Dream" speech.

 

Martin Luther King Jr, did not actually name his speeches, but this one is sometimes known as the "How Long? Not Long!" speech. As we brought readers through Elizabeth's retelling of the story while taking them on the long march both in text and in the virtual reality of Google Earth, the video clip is viewed within the context of having "virtually marched alongside" the marchers after multiple failed attempts to begin, having "virtually been there with the marchers" as they were beaten on one attempt to cross the imfamous Pettus Bridge, having marched in peace as helicopters buzzed above and various "law enforecement troops "protected and intimidated" the marchers, having faced the possible dangers ahead as they passed through some of the most notoriously violent and racist areas along the way,  having walked past the actual church where Martin Luther King jr was and had been the pastor for 20 years, in a sense having reached the end of the march "virtually exhausted" yet proud of surviving the intimidation and fears, and challenges of the march as though we had been there, it became clear that we were experiencing that speech from within a very different context than when we only read the speech from within the context of the very few pages devoted to the entire Civil Rights Movement in history books or the few days devoted to the entire Civil Rights Movement  in history classroom lectures and discussions where hundreds of years of history must be taught and learned in the matter of one or two semesters,, or from within the context of our livingrooms watching three-minute annual newscasts including only the briefest of video excerpts of original coverage of the entire Civil Rights Movement on Martin Luther King Day or from within the context of the recognition that preparing for the all important "test  on Chapter ____" in the history text is too often perceived as being the primary value of the brief encounter with importance of information about the Civil Rights Movement.

 

I can't help but also mention that building a Lit Trip is a journey in itself. As Elizabeth and I worked on the "Marching for Freedom" Lit Trip, she shared her behind the scenes stories that she discovered on her research journey that took her to places between and beyond Selma and Montgomery as she interviewed many of the actual participants to discover their individual and shared back stories. In sharing those with me and with her readers, I was not only reminded of my clear recollection of the events as I knew them, but I also learned how little I really knew about a subject I thought I'd paid particularly close attention to at the time. 

 

Ironically, though President Johnson's greatest legacy may have been his signing of the Civil Rights Bill Act of 1964, I had not seen anything beyond the sound bites of his incredible speech at the time. I realized after seeing that entire speech, that my opinion of President Johnson had been based too heavily upon my concerns that he "was no Jack Kennedy, that he was a hardball politician who appeared to be quite at ease employing tactics I perceived as having questionable ethics as well as questionable motives in order to get what he wanted, and that he was unable or perhaps less interested in resolving the Vietnam war conflict that he had inherited from multiple previous presidents;  an earily familiar sounding predicament today.

 

And while working with Elizabeth and discovering President Johnson's speech in its entirety, I came to realize that in my youth I had not allowed these very negative perceptions of President Johnson to be tempered at least a bit by the side he showed in the Civil Rights work he helped bring to fruition.

 

In discovering the entire version of his speech online, I came to realize that as a president from the south where remnants of the influence of pro-segregationist Dixicrat party still held signficant sway in the Democratic party, Johnson's speech represented not just a expression of Democratic support for the Civil Rights Movement, but also an act of extreme political and personal courage.

 

In conclusion, Shannon Hale, speaking no doubt of other matters, nailed a truth about "knowing." We can not know the truth about characters and the universal truths they represent about humanity in the "real world" until we travel with them through their journeys, at least as much as we can in the course of becoming aware of what it is to become not merely human beings but also humane beings. And, in the case of the Civil Rights Movement as well as perhaps all human activity, it is equaly important walk in the shoes of others through both fictionand nonfiction in order to discover what the forces are behind those who become inhumane beings.

 

 

 ~ www.GoogleLitTrips.com ~

Google Lit Trips is the fictitious business name for GLT Global ED, now an official 501c3 tax-exempt educational nonprofit

 

 

 

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Sunflower Foundation's curator insight, January 22, 5:07 PM

How great it this. I think being able to follow characters on their journey would be awesome. But I love fantasy, so unless the author provides maps I guess I am still stuck.

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The Diary of a Young Girl by Anne Frank

The Diary of a Young Girl by Anne Frank | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:

Google Lit Trips is proud to announce the addition of the . This Lit Trip was co-developed by Library Media Specialist Anne Brusca, who is also the developer of the popular Google Lit Trip for A Family Apart by Joan Lowery Nixon as well as the Google Lit Trip for Flesh & Blood So Cheap by Albert Marrin and Google Lit Trip founder, Jerome Burg.

 

This Google Lit Trip includes several placemarks mentioned in the diary including placemarks for:

 

Anne Frank's Birthplace containing a link to an interactive Timeline for the Frank family. The Timeline is rich in embedded media related to the Frank family from 1914 through 2012.

 

Anne Frank's Home: Where the Frank family lived prior to moving to the Secret Annex. Flying to this placemark goes directly into Google Earth Streetview" where students can see the very place where the family lived as it looks today. This placemark contains a link to the only known video footage of Anne Frank. Students will see the very window in Street View from which Anne appears in the video.

 

Anne's father's business commonly referred to as the "Anne Frank" Building: This placemark includes an historical aerial photograph with the building in which Otto' Frank's business was located tinted blue. It is easy to see that the Annex which is behind the blue tinted building is not visible from the street.

 

The Secret Annex: This placemark shifts the view to a bird's eye view showing the secret annex behind the street-side building and contains a link to a virtual walk-through tour of the entire Secret Annex. 

 

The Westerbrook Transit Camp: This placemark contains an image of the very hut in which the Frank family stayed while at the Westerbork Transit Camp. It also contains a link to a short video about the the memorial now located on the grounds of the Westerbork Transit Camp and a link to an exquisite photo slide show capturing the "feeling" of the place today as it has been set-aside to remember those who passed through this camp on their way to the unimaginable destinies that lay ahead for them.

 

Auschwitz Concentration Camp: This placemark contains a link to a 2 minute video about a photo book that presents,  "... 31 historical photographs taken by SS men in 1944 depicting the extermination of Jews in the Auschwitz II-Birkenau camp. They were set in contrast with present-day photographs of the same locations...." There is also a link to a website with more information about the Auschwitz Concentration Camp.

 

Bergen-Belsen Concentration Camp: This placemark marks the spot in the desolate area where the Bergen-Belsen Concentration once was and where Anne and her sister died.

 

Lest We Forget: This placemark is provides a view of the Yad Vashem 

The Holocaust Martyrs' and Heroes' Remembrance Authority
Jerusalem Israel. It also has links to other Holocaust Museums with interactive exhibits and other educational resources.

 

Those educators responsible for addressing Common Core State Standards for both literary reading and Informational reading and particularly those interested in cross-curricular studies will find this a valueable addition to: your students' learning experiences.

 

 ~ www.GoogleLitTrips.com ~

Google Lit Trips is the legal Fictitious business name of GLT Global ED, a 501c3 tax-exempt educational nonprofit.

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Heather Mac Donald: The Humanities Have Forgotten Their Humanity

Heather Mac Donald: The Humanities Have Forgotten Their Humanity | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
In The Wall Street Journal, Heather Mac Donald writes that when Shakespeare lost out to 'rubrics of gender, sexuality, race, and class' at UCLA, something vital was harmed.
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:

7 January 2014

 

There is something in this article for everyone to both love AND hate.

 

My first thougt after zigzagging my opinion  as I read the article was to wonder what the English Department conversations might be after it had been required to read;(self-imposed or otherwise)  as both an example of and as an opportunity to practice the skills of Informational Reading that most American English Departments are now required to include in their courses.

 

Your thoughts? Leave a comment below.

 

 ~ www.GoogleLitTrips.com  ~

Google Lit Trips is the fictitious business name of GLT Global ED now a 501C3 Tax-exempt educational nonprofit.

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enra " pleiades " - YouTube

enra " pleiades " - YouTube | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
Performamce & Choreography :Saya Watatani , Maki Yokoyama Director : Nobuyuki Hanabusa Animator : Seiya Ishii , Nobuyuki Hanabusa Music : Nobuyuki Hanabusa h...
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:

7 January 2013

 

Sometimes one stumbles across  a five-minute experience that creates such a n undefinably joyful moment that it just has to be shared.  Watch this video for a truly inspiring experience with what the fine arts brings to a well-lived existance. Worry about what it has to do with "Reading About Reading" some other time if you must. 

 

Be sure to click the Full Screen icon in the lower right corner of the video window. 

 

By the way... Could STEM education without the ARTS have produced this?

 

And, Could the ARTS without STEM Education have produced this?

 

Neither is "enough" without the others.

 

Let's hear it for STEAM education.

 

 ~ www.GoogleLitTrips.com ~

Google Lit Trips is the fictitous business name of GLT Global ED, a 501c3 tax-exempt educational nonprofit bringing wisdom to the Information age

 

 

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20 Excellent Websites That Make Your Children Smarter | Hemant Parikh

20 Excellent Websites That Make Your Children Smarter  | Hemant Parikh | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it

Work smarter, not harder” is an annoying cliché that works for obvious reasons. In the same respect, it’s crucial for us to make sure we’re learning smarter too, especially when it comes to our kids.

 

Luckily, the Internet exists. And using online resources for learning is considered to be one of the best ways to prepare your kids for college, but picking the right websites that help children learn can be a real challenge.

 

After all, there are countless tools, platforms and websites that are being marketed to parents with the promise of turning your child into the next Sheldon Cooper (though some of us will settle for a functioning adult).

 

So if what you’re looking for includes top-notch websites that will make your kids smart enough to win college scholarships, then consider these awesome resources.

GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:

18 December 2013

Google Lit Trips is proud to have "made the cut" on this list of 20 Excellent Websites That Make Your Children Smarter!"

 

____________________

10. Google Lit TripsVirtual field trips are great ways to capture the visual and experiential minds of our kids, and you have a lot of great trips to pick from if you search online. One of the best I have ever come across is Google Lit Trips, a completely free service that allows you to walk the shoes of famous literature characters in a virtual world. You’ll see what they saw in these awesome “trips,” ensuring a learning experience that actually sticks with your child.

____________________

 

What an honor to have been selected!

 

 ~ www.GoogleLitTrips.com ~

Google Lit Trips is the legal fictitious business name for GLT Global ED, a 501c3 tax-exempt educational nonprofit.

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宮西 咲's curator insight, December 25, 2013 2:30 PM

英語で遊べるサイト満載

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Yes, This Is Actually A Word

Yes, This Is Actually A Word | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
My last post, "12 Mistakes Nearly Everyone Who Writes about Grammar Mistakes Makes," drew a lot of comments, some supportive and some critical. But no point drew as much ire as my claim that irregardless is a word.
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:

13 December 2013

I refuse to use the word IRREGARDLESS of the argument presented in this intriguing  article!

 

BUT, I would certainly use this article in my efforts to meet CCSS expectations for informational reading.

 

Jonathon Owen makes a solid case for his argument that "irregardless" is a word; like it or not. And, in doing so he presents a fine example of every element of an excellent persuasive argument that models what we hope our students will absorb in learning to write persuasive arguments. It has a respectful and thoughtful concession, a clear thesis, many solid examples and reasoned commentary requiring readers to consider arguments that may be at variance from their existing opinions on the matter, and in his conclusion walks readers through palatable reasons for coming to terms with the possibility of the necessity to adjust their opinions. In doing so, Owen relies upon a calm, unemotional discussion of the kind of higher-level critical thinking skills that we profess to promote.

 

Yet, for so many of us, when we teach persuasive writing, students too often see the task as figuring out how to present some sort of trump card that knocks out counter-arguments and implies the writer has the right do take a victory lap while the losers hang their heads in shameful defeat.

 

We can certainly look to the concept of assuming argument should result in a black OR white, winner or loser outcome. Our judicial system is based upon an effort to determine guilt or innocense. Those of us who follow trials of note are often disappointed when one side or the other does not walk away having "won." A hung jury is almost always disappointing to both sides and thereby resented by many. We don't like games that end in a tie or a draw. This is not to be criticized. There ARE subjects where expecting a clear "winner" and clear "loser" can be expected.

 

We even try to encourage students to employ tricks to influence those judging our arguments that truthfully can be used to misdirect attention in hopes of influencing the critically inattentive.

 

"Appeal to emotion!"  as in...

 

I'm thinking "I want you to let me slip in this questionable statement  without thinking too much about it."...

...when I say, "The American People don't want ___________.(fill in the blank with a proposal made by the "other side's candidate")

 

Or, other emotional appeals based upon overgeneralization and misdirection such as...

 

, "Anyone who cares about children would want this book removed from the curriculum regardless of the foolishness of some silly literary society having given it an award so Mr. _________ has to be fired for imposing it on our children in his AP English course."

 

Where is the critical thinking when the implication of a persuasive argument is that anyone who professes an opposing view to his or her own opinion is to be thought of as:

wrong

foolish

ignorant

unpatriotic

unAmerican

socialist/communist

or (whatever other emotional word can be counted upon to trigger a desired Pavlovian response from the less critically thoughtful)?

 

OH MY! Did you catch that? I could have used a much more neutral term to describe the misdirective influence of appealing to emotion rather than logic, than using a term loaded with negative connotation like "Pavlovian response," and thereby implying that responding to emotional appeals without question is the sign of an unthinking person; a characteristic upon which those with the weaker argument can hope to garner support from the undecided.

 

Okay, I've been playing a sort of game in the last couple of paragraphs. If I ended my comments at the end of the preceding paragraph leaving readers to assume that my position is that emotional appeals are always bad, I would be guilty of the same "uncritical thinking" I appear to be condemning. There are reasons to use emotional appeal that are not malicious and misdirecting. Emotional appeals can amplify and clarify the facts so that they can or will be considered more thoroughly.

 

But I had something else in mind when I scooped this article.

 

In terms of exemplifying and encouraging higher-level critical thinking, Owen's article provides an interesting example of how persuasive argument might provide satisfactory outcomes even when intelligent people disagree. Compromise where neither side gets a complete victory over the other, frequently leaving both sides dissatisfied and/or put on the spot in having to explain to their various supporters why they "flip-flopped" WHILE ALSO supplying their opposition with devastating opportunities via targeted talking points to "prove the other side's inconsistent position statements. Persuasive argument need not always be seen as a winner take all by any means game.  

 

Owen's argument neither calls for a winner or lose judgment call. Nor does it ask proponents of either side of the controversy to sacrifice strongly held positions for the mere sake of compromise.

 

Owen's argument offers both sides some satisfaction without calling for either side to "sacrifice" strongly held beliefs. He does this by shining a new light on the subject. He accomplishes this by recognizing that there are TWO facets to the controversy rather than one. The first being whether "irregardless" is a word or not? The second being "If it is a word do I have to give in and allow my students to use it?

 

The outcome is more satisfying to both sides when there's a real and clear win for everyone. Those who come to recognize that there are excellent reasons why "irregardless" does qualify as a being a word, yet there are still good reasons to maintain that its use ought to be discouraged as nonstandard English. While those who are already in agreement that the word is a word, can also accept that there are good reasons to discourage its use.

 

Everybody wins AND we can put the argument to rest. 

 

Ain't that great?

 

 ~ www.GoogleLitTrips.com ~

Google Lit Trips is the legal fictitious business name for GLT Global ED, a 501c3 tax-exempt educational nonprofit

 

 

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Flesh & Blood So Cheap by Albert Marrin

Flesh & Blood So Cheap by Albert Marrin | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it

www.GoogleLitTrips.com

On March 25, 1911, the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory in New York City burst into flames.  The factory was crowded.  The doors were locked to ensure workers stay inside.  One hundred forty-six people—mostly women—perished; it was one of the most lethal workplace fires in American history until September 11, 2001.

GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:

10 December 2013

Google Lit Trips is proud to announce the addition of the Flesh & Blood So Cheap Google Lit Trip. This Lit Trip was co-developed by Library Media Specialist Anne Brusca, who is also the developer of the popular Google Lit Trip for A Family Apart by Joan Lowery Nixon. and her English Teacher Scott Colvin.  Anne and Scott are colleagues at New Hyde Park Memorial High School in New Hyde Park, New York.

 

This story of the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory Fire of March 25, 1911 caused the death of 146 garment workers;123 of whom were women.

 

The fire led to legislation requiring improved factory safety standards and helped spur the growth of the International Ladies' Garment Workers' Union, which fought for better working conditions for sweatshop workers.

 

Those educators responsible for addressing Common Core State Standards for both literary reading and Informational reading and particularly those interested in cross-curricular studies will find this a valueable addition to your curriculum.

 

 ~ www.GoogleLitTrips.com ~

Google Lit Trips is the legal Fictitious business name of GLT Global ED, a 501c3 tax-exempt educational nonprofit.

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