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Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading
An Educator's Reading List of Contemporary Literature, Literacy, and Reading Issues. Visit us at http://www.GoogleLitTrips.org
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Plotto: The Master Book of All Plots

Plotto: The Master Book of All Plots | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
The art of mechanized storytelling, or what a cardboard robot has to do with melodrama and Law & Order.

 

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Ok, I'm buying a copy of this one! No, not one of the $250 original copies. But, one of the reissued copies. The truths within the book (preview pages on Amazon) are fascinating. The assumptions that this carefully catalogued thesis can easily be envisioned as a step towards the mechanized authoring of great literature is pretty amusing, even to a techno-nerd like myself.

 

Take the time to take a good look at the News clipping. What the heck do we need literature teachers for anyway!

 

I'd love to put this in the hands of a creative writing class.

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The best 100 opening lines from books

The best 100 opening lines from books | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
There's nothing quite like a book that has you gripped from the very first line. As the first thing the reader reads, it's been said that the opening line sells a book whislt the closing line sells the author's next one.

 

 

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This and the associated companion article (The Best 100 CLOSING Lines from Books) are the kinds of articles that many students find just "terribly fascinating." And when students find such articles about literature "terribly fascinating" seeds are sown that bear nutritious harvests.

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Literary quotes to cure a bad mood

Literary quotes to cure a bad mood | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
Christmas is officially over after today, it's cold outside and the prospect of crawling back under the duvet and hibernating there for the next few months is, frankly, very tempting.

 

 

 

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It's a great day when one great Scoop.it find leads to another! I wouldn't have guessed it by its name, but I will be checking in on Stylist.co.uk much more frequently in the future!

 

I've always been a foe of Panglossian optimism and a fan of Martin Luther King's brand of optimisim.

 

As literature often serves the purpose of helping us find purpose by pointing out the work that humanity still has to do in its quest for "humane-ity," we sometimes find ourselves teaching books where good is not as victorious as we might hope it would have been. Atticus "loses" yet inspires us to keep fighting the good fight nevertheless. Poor Cyrano, "loses" in one sense, yet inspires us to consider the victory of having lived in accordance with his sense of obligation to the higher road in spite of how treacherous it is. 

 

Over the years of my teaching career,  I experienced variations of the same question from students repeatedly. "Why do we have to read all this depressing stuff?? From Huck to Holden, from Antigone to Anne Frank; for many students it almost seems like Lord of the Flies is pretty much how literature teachers see the world.

 

Yet many of the quotes in this article come from stories where goodness and hope are challenged.

 

When I taught a satire course for many years it was often the question of the day, "Can we be EFFECTIVE optimists, if we do not know the challenges optimists like Martin Luther King jr faced? 

 

Some great and uplifiting quotess from the fictional world for those who of us who live in the real world and recognize the dangers of seeing it through those rose-colored lenses that Panglossian optimists are so fond of. 

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McDonald’s UK to put books into the hands of families | National Literacy Trust

McDonald’s UK is to hand out around nine million popular children’s books with its Happy Meals.

 

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Well here's an interesting development. McDonalds is making a move in the "right direction." Though, exchanging chintzy product promotion toys with books might find few objectors, parents still must consider whether the improved enticement for feeding their children at McDonalds exceeds the concerns for proper nutrition and childhood obesity.

It's a tough call. Perhaps this is a transitional step we should at least appreciate. Perhaps, like the green movement, there are problems during the transition phases of searching for a better way to _____ (as in whatever we might be interested in improving) there will be sufficient appreciation to encourage McDonalds and their competitors to see their role in helping with social issues spread to nutrition, and concerns for the environment. 

Though I stopped eating at fast food restaurants long ago, I would encourage those who still do to express appreciation for the effort.  

It's pretty simple in a sense. If you're a consumer support those who are moving in directions you agree with and don't encourage those who are not.

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The Business Case for Reading Novels

The Business Case for Reading Novels | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
I've been a devoted, even fanatical reader of fiction my whole life, but sometimes I feel like I'm wasting time if I spend an evening immersed in Lee Child's newest thriller, or re-reading The Great Gatsby.

 

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The second of the two-scoop article set today...

 

Yes, science can explain why reading fiction has value that is quite the opposite of its provision of "escape" from the real world. Fiction literally helps us see and understand the real world better than those who do not read fiction see it. Almost makes me wonder if it is those who do not read fiction who are "escaping" the deeper engagement with the real world.

 

 

"The BUSINESS Case for Reading Novels"

 

hmmmm...

What about...

 

"The KINDNESS Case for Reading Novels"?

"The FRIENDLINESS Case for Reading Novels"?

"The THOUGHTFULNESS Case for Reading Novels"?

 

Can't help but wonder if these articles would SELL as well as

 

"The BUSINESS Case for Reading Novels."

I would humbly suggest that the author add two additional titles to her list of suggested readings for those in business. Consider Mark Twain's The Guilded Age and Upton Sinclair's The Jungle.

 

In any case, this article and the nearby scooped, "Changing Our Minds" article, build the case for becoming better people by articulating the benefits of fiction for those living their lives in the "real" world.

 

 

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Type Books: Stop-Motion Video A Tribute To Books

Type Books: Stop-Motion Video A Tribute To Books | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
Print books and the independent bookstores that sell them have not had a good year. E-books and the readers that display them are the hot new thing and pundits are saying that your neighbourhood bookstores are going the way of the dodo.

 

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I love this! All "entertainment" no "elevating" content. BUT marketing of a love of books is a much undervalued part of the efforts to increase literacy AND encourage a love of literature's "elevating" potential.

Find me a reader; struggling, reluctant, or enthusiastic who won't think this is pretty cool! 

Teach the SKILLS!

Sell the LOVE!

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World literature tour | Books | The Guardian

World literature tour | Books | The Guardian | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it

Readers suggest the best authors from a series of countries, creating an atlas of literature Click here to read about more countries on the blog...

 

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What a great site for fans of the Google Lit Trips concept. We live in times when it is important that our students come to realize that they live in a world where there are many stories, many points of both similarity and differences among cultures sharing our planet. 

 

To ignore world literatures or in some ways even worse, to pay only lip service to world literature by sharing a single piece as if it represented an entire culture, is dangerous in the flat world of the 21st century.

 

I used to start every semester with two small experiences that set the scene for my students. One the first day of class, students would enter my classroom finding the lights off with only a few candles for light. This made more of them nervous, I suppose than comfortable. I'd start by telling them that I the school rules required that I go over my classroom rules on the first day of class. Then I said, "Here's my rule." And, I reach over and push the play button that suddenly blasted Aretha Franklin's "Respect." While it was playing I'd reach into my pocket and pull out my cell phone (forbidden by school rules) and start waving it like people do at concerts. Then I'd tease the kids into joining me by reminding them that they only get one chance to make a good first impression. Slowly, and with a dah of obvious skepticism, one or two kids would join me by pulling out their cell phones. By the end of the song, I'd pretty much succeeded in getting the entire class waving their phones; some smiling, some with looks on their faces suggesting a concern about my weirdness. When the song ended, I'd turn the lights on and suggest that I only had one rule, "Respect." Simple enough?

 

I'd end the rules with this comment, "Here's a deal I'll make with you. "You automatically have my respect until you lose it, and I don't want your respect until I earn it." 

 

What does this have to do with this article? We live in times when the entire world is our neighborhood. We may or may not have immigrant students in our classrooms, but we all live in a world of interdependence of world cultures. Though there are certainly issues at hand that call negative attention to behaviors and beliefs of other cultures, it is absolutely imperative that we learn a bit more about our world neighbors. They are different and not so different from us. We might just get along a bit better if we knew more about our neighbors.

 

"R-E-S-P-E-C-T
Find out what it means to me
R-E-S-P-E-C-T
Take care, TCB..."

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California literature rides a wave - sacbee.com

California literature rides a wave - sacbee.com | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it

"Marietta College, a small liberal arts school in southeastern Ohio, is 2,200 miles and a cultural universe from San Francisco...

 

...But for English professor Beverly Hogue, the allure of California as a place of dreams and dashed hopes is powerful.

So last spring, Hogue led a class of literature students across the country on a weeklong trip to scour the Chinatown alleys of Maxine Hong Kingston, the poetry shelves at City Lights Bookstore and the misty hills of John Steinbeck's Salinas.

"The popular culture's image of California is a place where anything can happen," she said. "We still see it as a place of possibility."

 

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A great article that reaches into the heart of the Google Lit Trips vision.

 

Place does have its place in great literature.

 

Perhaps a good time to remind ourselves of one of the great travel writers who found himself writing much about his experiences in California...

 

""Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness.” Mark Twain

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The 25 Greatest Epigraphs in Literature - Flavorwire

The 25 Greatest Epigraphs in Literature - Flavorwire | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it

"The epigraph is a funny literary convention: excerpting lines of someone else’s work — or quotes, adages, lines of verse, lyrics, snippets of conversation, etc — to put before your own. The effect varies: often the epigraph serves as a sort of thematic gatekeeper, or simply sets the mood for the prose to come, sometimes it gives the reader a glimpse into the author’s intentions or inspirations, or it may serve as a joke or warning...."

 

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Great writers standing on the shoulders of great writers...

 

Thinking about the importance of giving more thought and attention to the underemphasized epigraph.

 

One of my favorites on the list...

"Come then, and let us pass a leisure hour in storytelling, and our story shall be the education of our heroes. — Plato, Republic, Book II
(from The Secret History by Donna Tartt)"

 

 

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Why Authors Tweet

Why Authors Tweet | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
Social media sites like Twitter are demystifying the writing profession — and that may be salutary.

 

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An intriguing behind the scenes look as the value or lack of value of behind the scenes looks at the lives of authors.

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Six things Dickens gave the modern world

Six things Dickens gave the modern world | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
With the 200th birthday of Charles Dickens quickly approaching, what is the lasting legacy of his work?

 

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And isn't that the reason some literature gets taught and others does not? 

The ol' Vygotsky bridge ... 

 

Market the story's "ability for students to answer their own question, "Yeah, but what's that ol' story got to do with the world I live in?!" When that light goes on, students' entire relationship with reading changes. 

 

 


Via Lisa A.F. Barefield
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My Term As The National Ambassador For Young People's Literature

My Term As The National Ambassador For Young People's Literature | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
Read for fun, read for information, read in order to understand yourself and other people with quite different ideas. Learn about the world beyond your door. Learn to be compassionate and grow in wisdom.

 

""Bridge to Terabithia saved my life." The speaker was Trent Ready, a 6'7" veteran of the war in Afghanistan. The 400 or so middle schoolers in the audience were staring up at the stage transfixed as he told them that reading a children's book in the desert, during a time when he thought any day might be his last, had made it possible for him to keep going--to find beauty in the midst of the ugliness of war. "I just want you guys to realize how important reading is. How a book can save your life."

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Just an idea... what if we taught literature as if we were ambassadors from the faraway worlds of great and as yet undiscovered ideas?

 

 

 

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Book Review: Why Our Schools Need the Arts

Book Review: Why Our Schools Need the Arts | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
Why Our High Schools Need the Arts provides arts advocates with the substantial ammunition we need to secure a permanent place for the arts in schools.

 

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It happens. Every once in awhile an article like this one makes me want to just pause and marinate in its wonderfulness. I want to stand up and applaud until my palms ache.

 

What price are we paying for ignoring what can not be bubble tested? 

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Should J.K. Rowling Win The Nobel Prize?

Should J.K. Rowling Win The Nobel Prize? | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
By Jeff O’Neal for BookRiot Last week, it came out that in 1961, C.S. Lewis nominated J.R.R. Tolkien for the Nobel Prize in Literature and that Tolkien was summarily dismissed by the committee.

 

 

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A thoughtful consideration of what the criteria was intended to be for the Nobel Prize for Literature. 

 

Nobel who invented dynamite (much to consider there) said in his will that hel wanted the Literature award to go to “to the person who shall have produced in the field of literature the most outstanding work in an ideal direction.”

 

"In an ideal direction..." There is a mystery to explore. Tolkein was nominated and rejected. What about J.K. Rowling? There is a case to be made for a writer who relit the flame of reading in millions. Of course, the book has also ignited the distain of those who believe that fiction containing magical content is too dangerous for children to read. (See http://www.christiananswers.net/q-eden/harrypotter.html for an example of this concern)

 

So did Tolkein move and has Rowling moved literature in "an ideal direction?"

 

Consider the contributions of these authors, all of whom have written famously banned books. And ALL of whom have been named Nobel Laureates.

 

John Steinbeck

Naguib Mahfouz

William Golding

Ernest Hemingway

William Faulkner

F. Scott Fitzgerald

 

Regardless of how one interprets the mysterious, "...most outstanding work in an ideal direction," I suppose the ideal direction requires a change in the less than ideal status quo. And, challenging the status quo has always been a bit of a threat to those who profit / benefit from things being fine just the way they are. 

 

 

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The best 100 closing lines from books

The best 100 closing lines from books | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
Don't judge a book by its cover - instead, try and wait for the last line.
Following our massively popular and lovingly selected list of the 100 best opening lines from books, it's now time for the closing lines to shine.

 

 

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Another "Two-Scoop treat.

This and the associated companion article (The Best 100 Opening Lines from Books) are the kinds of articles that many students find just "terribly fascinating." And when students find such articles about literature "terribly fascinating" seeds are sown that bear nutritious harvests.

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Literature's Feistiest Females

Literature's Feistiest Females | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
The simpering cries of damsels in distress can be found in acres of texts - but not the ones Stylist is looking at in this gallery of literature's strongest female characters.

 

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Some "good girls" some "bad girlz," but all are fascinating and feisty.

 

The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo has certainly brought attention to the size of the reading audience for "feisty females." As was the case with the Harry Potter series and others that have re-engaged readers in recent times. 

 

But, Lisbeth Salender, follows in the footsteps of some of the greatest literature's greatest characters. 

 

What a reading project it would make to offer the option of reading several of these great works! Might go a long way towards getting past the too often lip-service only approach to the importance of addressing the concerns of the canon being a "white male only club." 

 

I can see a lot of students enjoying and engaging in a beyond the lip service reading project based on these titles.

 

Can you think of others feisty female characters from great literature?

 

Antigone perhaps, Katherine from The Taming of the Shrew perhaps... others?

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Tyler Cowen: Be suspicious of stories | Video on TED.com

Tyler Cowen: Be suspicious of stories | Video on TED.com | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
TED Talks Like all of us, economist Tyler Cowen loves a good story. But in this intriguing talk from TEDxMidAtlantic, he asks us to step away from thinking of our lives -- and our messy, complicated irrational world -- in terms of a simple narrative.

 

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I could not agree more whole-heartedly with the thesis presented in this TEDTalk that there is danger in over-simplification. This over-simplified explanation of that concern is proof. 

 

Every example of the perils of over-simplification is over-simplified and the conclusions drawn are indeed dangerous.

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Changing our Minds

Changing our Minds | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
By imagining many possible worlds, argues novelist and psychologist Keith Oatley, fiction helps us understand ourselves and others.

 

 

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When I was a kid, on very rare occasions, my parents would lower their otherwise strict rules regarding "junk food" and we'd stop by a Baskin Robbins for an ice cream cone. The treat was rare and then intensified when I was actually encouraged to ask for "two scoops."

 

Today... two scoops of reading for the greater good please.

 

This article is 1 of 2 scoops today. Both related in their focus upon scientific support for the benefit of reading fiction for those of us who live in the "real world." Both make the case for those not aware that fiction frequently has a laser-like focus on truth that can perhaps be, in Stephen Colbert's words  "truthier" than our understandings of the real world tend to be.

 

 

 

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Against Walter Dean Myers and the dumbing down of literature: 'Those kids' can read Homer

Against Walter Dean Myers and the dumbing down of literature: 'Those kids' can read Homer | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it

"We need less Myers and more Homer – and not in Cambridge and Oxford, but in Bedford-Stuyvesant and Southside Chicago. We need a kid beaten down by project life, struggling with all her might to rise from the fatal suction of the streets, to open the “Lysistrata” and let out a single laugh. Call me a romantic, an earnest fool, but that laugh could save her."

 

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It is probably the rare literature teacher who has not found him or herself in a department meeting being expected to choose sides in this classic pedagogical tug-of-war.

 

Early in my own teaching career, I took sides and sometimes I left department meetings quite annoyed and other times I left department meetings with a self-righteous smirk thinking that "my side" had scored more points that day than the opposition.

 

But over the course of my first few years in the classroom, I came to realize that the conversation never seemed to change, never seemed to grow, and led at most to only the most superficial and temporary "adjustments" in how we did business... just like an evenly matched tug-of-war, because we WERE pretty much evenly matched. We'd all had earned degrees and credentials that gave us an arsensal (<- oooh, a sign of a mixed metaphor in the works!) of arguments for our weekly high noon shoot outs.

 

Well, the weekly department meetings weren't really shoot outs at high noon. They were more, in truth, more like tug-of-wars. We were too polite, for the most part, to let these differences of opinion cause our otherwise deep collegial friendships to disinegrate, but we also did not push hard enough into the questions behind the question to cause much in the way of paradigm shifting either.

 

Truthfully, we didn't so much use these conversations as a means of refining and tweaking our pedagogical paradigms as much as we simply developed various ways of accepting the stalemate.

 

The question is NOT whether the classics or YA Lit are worthless. Just as the question is NOT whether what we read must be elevating OR entertaining. That is as silly as believing that children's medicines would be just as effective without the candy coating or fruit flavorings. Of course the medicine would work just as well without the flavoring IF the children would gleefully "swallow the bitter pill" with no other motivation than that "it is good for them." But they don't often find that argument sufficiently engaging without some additional enticements.

 

There are classics written by authors who recognize the need to add the entertaining engagement of candy coating to their stories in order to get readers (or playgoers) to gleefully take the elevating medicine they're woven into their works. Think Voltaire, Swift, Shakespeare, Twain, just to get started. All used humor, frequently quite base humor, to entice their audiences into taking the medicines. And speaking of Homer as this article's author does, sex and violence have also found their  place in much of what we consider to be classics.

 

Getting to the medicines of the classics might be an admirable goal. I for one certainly believe it is. But, getting there is a journey of transitions from reading that is more candy than medicine to a love of reading that is much more engaging because of its medicine content than its candy content.  

 

(WARNING: Another metaphor alert!)

We all went from crawling, to walking, to  tricycles to two wheelers with training wheels, to bicycles without and then some of us even mastered the unicycle. But, none of us jumped out of the crib and were seriously expected to jump directly onto a unicycle. No, our transition depended much more upon where we were and who was there for us as we progressed along that learning curve. 

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WorldWide Book Drive - Home

WorldWide Book Drive - Home | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it

"We Promote Global Literacy and Education by Donating and Recycling Books."

 

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My ol' pal Vygotsky again...

 

I've found that students of all ages are often quite enthusiastic about finding local ways of supporting causes beyond their local worlds that they perceive as "doing something good" for others. Being part of a larger community of people caring about others can be contagious. When students are "involved" in giving, much more often than not, in short order, they realize that giving is a has its serendipity. They, often unknowingly, are cultivating the seed of caring about their own roles and personal responsibilities in the world beyond their own.

It's a win-win. 

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Knowledge Without Borders project launched

SHARJAH - Knowledge Without Borders is planning to provide a library of Arabic books to 22,000- 24,000 families in the emirate of Sharjah over the course of this year.

 

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I've always admired the concept of wanting to hear what I don't want to hear. 

 

Love this excerpt...

“ 'Kids are our main target and the programme of reading focuses on how to encourage young children to read and listen to their training, analysis and discussion and discover their interests and needs through the activities of reading stories', said Rashid Alkous General Manager of the project, indicating that reading as a human activity is one of the most important habits that elevate thinking, awareness of rights and evoke his personal experiences."

 

How many of us have chosen to explore Arabic writing in our various efforts to represent multi-cultural literature?

 

Why do you suppose that is?

 

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Hello from the Catbird Seat « Poetry and Lit from the Catbird Seat

"Happy New Year, and welcome to the inaugural post for “From the Catbird Seat: Poetry and Literature at the Library of Congress.” My name is Robert Casper—I am the head of the Library’s Poetry and Literature Center, and am pleased to welcome you here..."

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An interesting new blog from the Library of Congress for lovers of Poetry and Literature. This past summer I had the great opportunity to take a semi-private tour of the Library of Congress with a couple of great friends of the Google Lit Trips project. What an incredible place!

 

I was absolutely in awe of the place, the space, the history, the library, the library, the library. The Library of Congress! What a treasure.

 

Yet, while I marinated in the historical significance of one of the greatest libraries of all time, I was amazed to discover the forward motion of the library's efforts to employ new technologies to make that vast treasure available and accessible to those unable to walk its hallowed halls. Check out the link in the first paragraph to the Library's Poetry and Literature Center. Great webcasts and resources to refresh the souls lit-lovers. And, a great reminder that in spite of the bad opinions that many have about our nation's capital, there are some mighty impressive ideals upon which we were founded that bear preservation and promotion. 

 

This is a blog I'll be checking on a regular basis. 

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The Attraction-Repulsion of International Literature

The Attraction-Repulsion of International Literature | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
W.W. Norton's Alane Salierno Mason discusses the challenges of convincing American's to read foreign literature and American lit by writers with foreign names.

 

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Provincialism used to refer to the kind of narrow-minded lack of sophistication that was believed to be common among those who lived  in a sort of intellectual isolation, primarily as a result of living away from the larger population centers where ideas had momentum; mixing and competing with each other generating contemplation and consideration and thought-provoking conversation.

 

Provincial thinking was considered embarrassing; often proudly displayed. There were terms describing such people... "country bumpkins," "village idiots."

 

These are unkind criticisms, though it can not be denied they are sometimes true. 

 

But provincialism is not the sole characteristic of those who live "too far" from locations where more sophisticated and complex thinking is common. Such black and white, no gray area thinking, is easy to find everywhere. To dismiss provincialism (or is is xenophobia?) as being little more than an embarrassment to thinking people is a dangerous form of provincial thinking itself. 

 

In the 21st century, "We are," (more than ever before), as the article's pull-quote says, "all related, our lives and fates are interdependent." 

To jump to provincial conclusions about others based upon no-more than a discomfort with anything or anyone beyond our previous experiences is dangerous. Today's headlines literally drip with examples of the dangers of provincial thinking.

 

But, in spite of the provincial noise,...

 

Not all Muslims are "___."

Not all immigrants are "____."

Not all poor people are "____."

Not all wealthy people are "____."

Not all liberals are "_____."

Not all conservatives are "_____."

 

You know the words that populate the blanks because you've heard them; and you've heard them often. And, if your heart and your mind are open and if you're honest, you know that no good comes from such provincial thinking.

 

Experiencing "Foreign-ness" whether in the real world or via the virtual world of literature, is not poisonous. In fact, in many ways it is quite curative. 

 

 

 

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Whichbook | A new way of choosing what to read next

Whichbook | A new way of choosing what to read next | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it

Whichbook enables millions of combinations of factors and then suggests books which most closely match your needs. Click to open and move the slider bars to set your choices.

 

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This is pretty cool. I remember students desperate to find a book they'd like who had no other filtering system than to ask, "Mr. Burg, can you tell me a book I'd like?" This tool might be of interest to them. It subtly empowers them to explore their existing criteria. The process of selecting a book to read involves their taking control of the process. 

 

Don't overlook the tiny buttons at the bottom of the left column. It took me a few minutes to discover that there are many more combinations of search tools than were at first apparent. 

 

Play with the tool with your overhead projection device, model exploration, model intrigue with the results, model fascination with how the tool works...

 

I'll bet there is "something" about using an online tool to essentially ask the same question about book recommendations that kids ask their teachers, that changes the process from a passive "I just don't know what to read" process to a much more engaged "explore on my own" process. 

 

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Librarian in Black – Sarah Houghton

Librarian in Black – Sarah Houghton | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it

Amazingly informed & therefore properly opinionated

 

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Attitude is not always "just attitude." Just came across this very cool blog produced by the kind of librarian every school should covet. Totally informed about great reading and contemporary issues related to libraries, literature, technology. I don't know if it's her black sleeveless wardrobe proudly displaying her ink, the "stylish voice" in her talks, or the proud attitude in her Librarian In Black subtitle, "Amazingly informed & therefore properly opinionated" that make this blog jump to the top of my must-check-frequently list.  But it is refreshing, challenging, and encouraging to those of us who believe in libraries and being well-read.

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