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Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading
An Educator's Reading List of Contemporary Literature, Literacy, and Reading Issues. Visit us at http://www.GoogleLitTrips.org
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Book Chargers cleverly hide your iPhone dock in a vintage hardcover book

Book Chargers cleverly hide your iPhone dock in a vintage hardcover book | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
Read 'Book Chargers cleverly hide your iPhone dock in a vintage hardcover book' on Digital Trends. If you're not one for the shine and gloss of typical...

 

 

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This article is featuring a line of products (see link in article).

 

When I looked at the referenced product page, I couldn't help but think that anyone could do this with a little bit of thought!

 

Wouldn't this be a great decor item in a kid's room?A parent /child project could create a tactile experience that provides an engaging tactile and visual engagement with books with the added bonus of connecting paper-based books and digital books in a positive way.

 

I've got just the place in the family room where a stack of books will certainly add a lot more character(s) to the room than the dangling charger wires currently there!

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Walter Dean Myers: National Ambassador for Young People's Literature Talks to The Root

Walter Dean Myers: National Ambassador for Young People's Literature Talks to The Root | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
Walter Dean Myers says that equality of opportunity is meaningless if black kids aren't literate.

 

 

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Walter Dean Myers, the national ambassador for young people's literature, discusses why he believes, "To do well in life, you have to read well," and "Reading is not optional."

 

 

 

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Marty Stuart - My Mississippi - Mississippi Authors

Marty Stuart tells the story of literary giants from the great state of Mississippi. Learn about the many famous authors who have called Mississippi home.

 

 

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I thought I'd share this video as an example of a Google Lit Trips concept I'm working on. Can you imagine students from all over the globe creating short projects like this one about their own local literary giants and then posting those videos on Google Earth with placemarks representing the locations where those authors were born or worked?

 

What a "live literary map" that would be. And what a way for students to find themselves literarlly and virtually, among giants in their own "zone of proximal development."

 

And imagine what kinds of virtual touring your students could lead as well as explore if students all over the globe were doing the same?

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10 Works of Literature That Were Really Hard to Write - Mental Floss

10 Works of Literature That Were Really Hard to Write - Mental Floss | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it

10 Works of Literature That Were Really Hard to Write

Instead of judging works of literature based on their artistic merit, we’ve decided to rank them by degree of difficulty.

 

 

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Ok, it appears as though there's going to be a pattern of "oddballness" in today's posts!

First literary tattoos, now this.

 

I'd certainly find a way to share this with my students. The stories behind how these stories came about are really fascinating.

 

I wonder what kind of parallel parameters one could set in a short writing assignment that would be so intriguing that kids would accept the challenge of taking a stab at it.

 

Would their be any value in such an assignment? I actually think there might be. What an incredible focus would be brought to the power of "every single word, perhaps on every single letter even, that goes into the attempt.

 

I could see this as a small group (3 members max) one class period challenge.

 

I think it might be cool for each group to actually have to first create and define their own challenge and then to actually give it a shot.

 

My first idea would be, who could write a poem of less that 10 lines that has the most occurances of the letter Z? 

 

or... who can write a one page (or other appropriate but relatively short) story with the fewest vowels?

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The Fantastic Flying Books of Mr. Morris Lessmore: An Oscar-Nominated Film for Book Lovers

The Fantastic Flying Books of Mr. Morris Lessmore: An Oscar-Nominated Film for Book Lovers | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it


The Fantastic Flying Books of Mr. Morris Lessmore offers a modern tribute to an old world.

 

 

 

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THIS IS WONDERFUL!!!

If you love books you simply won't believe the incredible 14 minute homage to the power of books in our lives.

 

If I weren't such a polite guy, I'd insist that you stop whatever you're doing and watch this video RIGHT NOW!.

 

For the best view, click the full screen icon (to the left of the word vimeo in lower right corner)

 

This is another example of the treasure that Open Culture dot com is!

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27 Ways to Celebrate Family Literacy Day

27 Ways to Celebrate Family Literacy Day | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
January 27 is Family Literacy Day. Here are 27 ways to celebrate, categorized according to Canada's 9 Literacy and Essential Skills.
by Dr. Sarah Elaine Eaton

Reading text
1. Read to your chil...

 

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Amen!  You go Canada! 

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BOOK RIOT | News, reviews and commentary on books and reading, except, you know, fun

BOOK RIOT | News, reviews and commentary on books and reading, except, you know, fun | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it

BookRiot.com

 

Gotta Love this site!

Here's just a short list of recent articles...

Literary Names I Would Never Give My Children

Name That Author!: Episode 12

Warning: This Is A Post About Disclaimers

A Bookish Look at the Best Picture Nominees

CRITICAL LINKING...

Breakig Down the (Fan) Base: Who Really Claims These Famous Novels as Favorites?

 

This site is like a Vitamin L blast. Taken once a day, your LOVE for all things Literature will get a daily boost!

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What are the practical applications of literature? | Focus on health

I came across this webpage today and found it disturbing on multiple counts and perhaps worthy of consideration by professional educators.

 

First, let me say that I'm a bit (but only a bit) uncomfortable in scoop.ing this article because it is almost as though I'm sharing someone else's personal concerns, though the author did choose to post the article to the web.

 

I'm NOT concerned that the article was clearly written by someone who is still struggling with his or her command of the English language. Though there are several "language usage" issues, it is more than clear that the author wants to do well and is making a strong effort to improve his/her skills in this regard.

 

However, the frustration expressed by the author are worth noting. And those frustrations are not limited to only those new to a second or subsequent language. There are plenty of native speakers for whom this article speaks.

 

This student, who has more to gain from the emphasis upon passing tests than the native speaker might have, hits one of the unspoken bulls-eyes of literacy and literature education. 

 

The emphasis is too often on the skill and the testing of the skill and too infrequently upon the value of having the skill. This student is "doing well" in the course but still has no clue what the value of being well-read is. 

 

Let's give students like this one a gift. Appreciate the frustration and sell them the value of having the skill to find the wonders of life within the themes of great literature. 

 

To correct this student's mechanics, grammar and usage is to miss the lesson we can learn from this student's heartfelt frustration. Let's always be open to the possibility that our struggling or reluctant students can be our best teachers.

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Teacher's Words That Changed My Life

Who are the Mrs. Gradys, and Mrs. Pinters and Mrs. Hillkers and Mrs. Dilleys in your life? In your child's? Has our educational system gotten so "teach to the test" oriented that there is no space for a life-changing teacher today?

 

 

 

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(You can listen to Nick Kristof tell this story in a 2 minute recording he did for StoryCorps here:

http://storycorps.org/listen/stories/judge-olly-neal-and-his-daughter-karama/

 

 

I hope stories like this one are inspirational to teachers of every subject. Sometimes we do "just the right thing" for our students.

 

It's so easy to allow the stresses of the profession, from administrivia to dealing with difficult students to occasionally disrupt or even gradually erode our dedication to doing the best we can for all of our students. 

 

But stories like this one remind us that at any moment we can be exactly what our students need us to be.

 

We can't always be on our top game, but we can take it to heart that our students' perceptions of our interactions with them makes a difference.  Yet, sometimes there's a great lag between their coming to appreciate our efforts to be what they needed us to be when they were young and still meandering in the fog of youthful indescretion. 

 

Decades later, I still remember clearly a senior telling me as I handed him his diploma how much he had appreciated "that thing you did when I was being a smart-ass in my journal that day." 

 

That thing I did... It was nothing really. But there on the stage as I handed him his diploma and shook his hand, there was no doubt about it. The firmness of his handshake and direct eye contact let me know that it wasn't "nothing" from where he was standing.

 

There is, at least in my mind, no greater reward in this profession than discovering, whether it is sooner or decades later, that you were among "the ones" they remember when they remember the best of their schooling experiences.

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Style For Book Nerds: 10 Literary-Inspired Looks For A Well-Read Wardrobe

Style For Book Nerds: 10 Literary-Inspired Looks For A Well-Read Wardrobe | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
Let's be honest -- we all love looking smart. But you don't need to rock a pair of thick plastic-framed glasses or a tattoo of your favorite Plato quote to do it!

 

 

 

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Taking SERIOUS pride in being well-read is a great way to promote one's love for reading!

 

I'm SERIOUSLY considering #7!!

 

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White Jade Tiger by Julie Lawson

White Jade Tiger by Julie Lawson | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it

“Jasmine is not sure she likes the idea of being stuck in Victoria while her father goes to China for a year. But on a field trip to Chinatown, she explores a curious shop in Fan Tan Alley and accidentally passes through a hidden door. She finds herself in Victoria's Chinatown of the late 1880's. Mistaken for a Chinese boy, she is soon caught up in a race through the Fraser Canyon to find a tiger amulet.”

 

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Thanks to Kevin Amboe of Surrey, British Columbia for developing and contributing this Google Lit Trip.

 

We're grateful to his contribution to Google Lit Trips' vision of increasing global literary awareness.

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Morning Shows Say No to Newbery/Caldecott

Morning Shows Say No to Newbery/Caldecott | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
If you turned on your TV this morning to watch the newly minted Newbery and Caldecott Medalists speaking about their books, you were out of luck.

 

 

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HARUMPH!!!

Supply and Demand tells the story.

 

Not ONE, but TWO questions...

1. What does this say about the "product supply" provided by these popular TV Shows? 

2. What does it say about the "product demand" of the viewing audience?

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Bloomsday, Quidditch And Other Cult Literary Traditions

Bloomsday, Quidditch And Other Cult Literary Traditions | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
By Emily Temple for Flavorwire: Sometimes you love a book — or an author’s body of works — so much that you need an outlet that allows you to express that love.

 

 

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Marinating in the traditions that celebrate one's love for literature.

What literary "tradition" would you love to see and participate in? 

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Table of years in literature - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Table of years in literature - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it

Wikipedia has taken its hits in academia, but many of the opinions still held are obsolete. Wikipedia has and continues to take an aggressive and proactive position on addressing early concerns about its reliability. (see: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reliability_of_Wikipedia)

 

For those teaching literature, click on any of these dates for information about literature in that year. 

 

If you haven't taken a look at Wikipedia lately, you may be amazed at its evolution.

 

And if by chance you do find shortcomings or inaccuracies, turn lemons into lemonade! Have your students correct the information! They'll learn about research, literature, accuracy, and be contributors to a worthwhile project bringing literary information to the world. What more authentic audience can there be?

 

 

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From Mark Twain to Ray Bradbury, Iconic Writers on Truth vs. Fiction

From Mark Twain to Ray Bradbury, Iconic Writers on Truth vs. Fiction | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
What a the literary greats can teach us about the fine points of make-believe...

 

 

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Please excuz ne typoes! Im trying to tipe while jumping up and down and giving this rtical a standing ovation!!!

 

Don't like to pick favorites, BUT gotta love this one by guess who....

 

""You should never read just for 'enjoyment.' Read to make yourself smarter! Less judgmental. More apt to understand your friends' insane behavior, or better yet, your own. Pick 'hard books.' Ones you have to concentrate on while reading. And for god's sake, don't let me ever hear you say, 'I can't read fiction. I only have time for the truth.' Fiction is the truth, fool!"

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The 10 Most Iconic Accessories of Famous Authors - Flavorwire

The 10 Most Iconic Accessories of Famous Authors - Flavorwire | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
Flavorwire: Cultural news and critique from Flavorpill...

 

 

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The Road Not Taken was one of the earliest experiences I had (while actually paying attention) with literature that began the process of setting me free from always choosing the default value set without question.

 

There of course was a gray phase to my transition. During the late 60s when I let my hair grow beyond the "norm" (and it actually still was willing to grow!) I wore ratty t-shirts, torn jeans, tie-dye, and all those things that every hippie-ish "radical" wore because we wanted to "be different." That's why we all dressed the same don't you see? To be different!

 

Though my own desire to find a different road wasn't all that well thought out at the time, it was a transitional phase more than an ingnorant hypocrisy. 

 

The transitions from "anti-establishment" to Dylan's challenging of the status quo even among popular musicians led in short order to the discovery that Voltaire and Swift and Twain and e.e.cummings and pretty much all great writers (to my surprise) were all in the business of encouraging their readers to reconsider, to revisit, to be open to non-standard paradigms.

 

These examples of "weird habits" of famous authors are fascinating. I am reminded of how intriguing I found JD Salinger's and Harper Lee's self-imposed separation from the public eye. My first thoughts were something like, "What's wrong with these people?! They could be rich and famous and could buy anything they wanted and they choose to intentionally avoid all that???? THEY must be CRAZY!!"

 

We might be well advised to remember that our students wearing their baggy pants or excessive make-up may be in transition towards valuing thinking for themselves, not necessarily proving their shallowness. Perhaps we should encourage those who are no longer in their catapiller stange but not yet in their butterfly phase either to keep searching for who they are and who they may wish to become. Maybe we should not be so hard on those in their transitionary cocoons. What they are while in their cocoons is not what they are on their way to becoming.

 

Are these authors really weird? or are they simply "the different drummers" we might want to tune into when we find ourselves making decisions as to which drummers we will march to? 

 

 

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Contrariwise: Literary Tattoos

Contrariwise: Literary Tattoos | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it

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Uh.... I don't know what to say about this!

These people must have had "some kind of intense" English teachers! (or not!)

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PEN.org » Blog Archive Virginia Woolf: How Should One Read a Book? - PEN.org

PEN.org » Blog Archive Virginia Woolf: How Should One Read a Book? - PEN.org | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
Thought you knew how to read? Virginia Woolf explains otherwise.

 

 

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That word "explains" amuses me. This lengthy and eloquent "explanation" of how to read is a rough road to read itself.

I don't think that even in my graduate school days that I would have survived the attempt to get through this article, though as I read it today, as difficult as it still is, I find it charmingly interesting. Do I dismiss Woolf's explanation as being quaint but perhaps antiquated and therefore not really of much value in promoting the importance of being well-read?

Only sort of.

To read it and get value from it one must be open to the difficult journey of getting through it without giving up. It offers much to question from my 21st century point of view. Yet, by slogging through, I found more and more pearls of wisdom for which I was happy to have made the difficult journey.

 

Just a reminder that it is frequently the difficult journeys that pay the highest dividends.

 

I would be hard pressed to consider this the best way to address its issue with a typical high school class, even an AP class.

In some ways it exemplifies the frustration that many a high school student has expressed regarding his or her bafflement at what their teachers expect them to "see between the lines."

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And speaking of reading between the lines, I've just enjoyed reading a wonderful book entitled, "How to Read Literature Like a Professor" by Thomas C. Foster.
http://www.amazon.com/How-Read-Literature-Like-Professor/dp/006000942X  (also available on iTunes at http://itunes.apple.com/us/book/how-to-read-literature-like/id360609340?mt=11  It is not only an excellent guide to learning how to read between the lines, but it is both written in an engaging style AND it focuses not on being able to pass a test on the book but rather how to recognize the tricks of the trade that great authors frequently employ and how they add new world of understanding to the reading experience by making those layers upon layers of a story's message almost jump off the page. I can imagine that the constant string of "ah-ha!" moments would bring an unprecedented joy to even the most enthusiastic reader!


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Libraries, Sexual Content and the Internet: Striking a Balance Between Rights, Access, And Comfort

Recent sensational media reports about "porn in libraries" do not reflect the reality of library services today or promote meaningful dialogue in our communities.

 

 

 

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Today is the second anniversary of the death of J.D. Salinger, an author whose "Catcher in the Rye" rocketed to the top of The New York Times bestseller list within two weeks of it publication in 1951. And meanwhile, has been one of the top 10 most censored books in public schools ever since. Why? Mostly because Salinger used the infamous "F-word" three times causing the novel to spark 60 years of the most meaningful as well as the most meaningless dialogue regarding what is appropriate reading for our students. 

 

When I read the book in 12th grade, I wasn't bothered by the "F-words," to tell you the truth, I'd heard that word, even used it, a few times. It's intrigue to me wasn't pornographic, but its power to raise eyebrows among adults I didn't care about offending and to get some silly kind of macho respect from my buddies whom I cared about impressing.

 

For the most part, I knew the difference between polite conversation and inappropriate language. But, I hadn't considered whether the word itself was enough to trump the meaningful conversations we were having in class about Holden's dilemma as he tried to find his way in a world where he was discovering the darker elements of human behavior. He was caring in what appeared to him to be an uncaring world. His early means of dealing with Stradlater, the self-serving jerk who could care less about the girls he dated, was a defense mechanism. His rudeness provided a buffer zone of sorts. The message he sent out to the world through sarcasm and rudeness was clearly contradicted by the obvious caring he had for his little sister and for Jane and even for the mother of one of the "jerkier" students at school.

 

Those classroom conversations were among the most meaningful dialogues I'd experienced in a classroom to date.

 

They raised my own maturity level several steps as I contemplated my own use of sarcasm and rude humor. I actually remember coming to the realization that like Holden, I could not be a catcher in the rye protecting children from the darker realities of life; but at the same time I did not need to be part of the problem either. It was reading that book, and participating in those very meaningful class discussion and then reflecting upon my previous reading of To Kill A Mockingbird and later of The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn and even later when I read Candide as a freshman in college that paved the way for me to find a more realistic way to be a catcher in the rye without being so naive about it.  I could follow in the footsteps of Atticus Finch and Tom Joad and Martin Luther King jr. and Mother Teresa and all those who fought the good fight, knowing that the "F-words" (as in "poverty," "hunger," "oppression," "violence;" all F-words in my book) can not all be erased. But, choosing to do nothing because it had never occurred to me that I should care OR because I had allowed myself to become simplistically pessimististic was much more dangerous to society than the "F-words" themselves. 

 

I owe much to the meaningful dialogues generated by many works of literature that challenged the previously unchallenged assumptions I'd made about right and wrong, helpful and hurtful, wise and foolish behaviors. I owe my appreciation for introspection, reflection, and questioning my own default assumptions to the "F-word" and the thought provoking meaningful conversations it generated.

 

My concern today is that we may be losing our interest in becoming introspective, reflective or in questioning our default assumptions. 

 

And perhaps there are more important dialogues we ought to be having as global citizens than those that currently get so much "discussion."

 

The term "Sensational media reports," though often used by those we suspect of having been exposed by responsible media reports, does identify a failure of obligation by the media in a market driven by so much competition that "meaningful reporting" has come to be a non-competitive practice. Why does Kim Kardashian get more ink than Hamid Karzai? 

 

It's fairly simple. Kim Kardashian sells more papers than Hamid Karzai. Papers get sold; but what happens to "meaningful dialogue in our communities?"

 

If we have fed our brains on a steady diet of the Kardashians will we be capable of adequately participating in meaningful dialogues about the Karzais of our global neighborhood?

 

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Classic literature: ‘Boring’ or relevant? | TeleRead: News and views on e-books, libraries, publishing and related topics

Classic literature: ‘Boring’ or relevant? | TeleRead: News and views on e-books, libraries, publishing and related topics | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
I came across a rather interesting pair of posts on BookRiot today.

 

 

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And serendipitously, right after scooping the previous article questiong the value of literature written by an English Language Learner, I came across this version of the same question as posed by someone who obivously feels a need to defend literature even to our "better readers."

 

The two links in the first paragraph are worth checking out if you feel that the questioning of the value of reading literature is limited to only our struggling or reluctant readers.

 

What adjustments do these articles call for US to make in our paradigms and pedagogies?

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E-Literature Gaming

E-Literature Gaming | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it

"For most people, reading a book and playing a video game are two very separate activities. In fact, more often than not we are encouraged to do the former in lieu of the latter. While there is certainly merit in reading more tangible literature, I cannot help but question the value of books within games."

 

 

 

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This article from a literature course being taught at the University of Mary Washington, points to another intriguing new development in the world of reading.

 

Though in the early days most computer games relied heavily upon text, the requirement for text support has faded dramatically as animation and other resources became more readily available to game developers. 

 

But, here we have an article about the intentional return of text stories to the gaming interface. 

 

It's an interesting turn of event that I think bears contemplation. The author concedes that the "over one-hundred different stories, journals, et cetera planted throught the game world...contain no Puliter Prize-winning literature..." However, when we think about the general decline in interest in reading, particularly, but not exclusively, among our struggling or reluctant reading students, this may be an idea whose time has come. Play the game, you read the stories! If, and its a big if, the game is engaging enough, it may be just the bridge to reading we might have in our tool box for our  less than enthusiastic readers.

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Teaching With Tablets: For Young Readers, It's Interaction vs. Distraction

Teaching With Tablets: For Young Readers, It's Interaction vs. Distraction | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it

"I believe the questions Milone raises point to the central challenge of using tablets as teachers: How do you use interactivity to deepen the experience of reading when it now is mostly employed to insert cartoons and other distractions that take kids away from reading altogether? (For an example, check out Moonbot's beautiful but distracting new alphabet book app, The Numberlys.)"

 

 

 

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I guess I taught long enough to become wary about claims that "the new" was going to be some sort of panacea for all the shortcomings of the status quo. 

 

While at the same time I've found much to be frustrated about in those sometimes referred to as Luddites.

 

History is full of examples of disruptive technologies (and ideas) that in their early phases were criticized. The typewriter and iPads; painting and photography; stage productions and film all come to mind. 

 

But, frequently ideas that "seemed like good ideas at the time" but aren't tend to fade. And ideas that "seemed like bad ideas at the time" that weren't tend to outlast the criticism. 

 

These conclusions are not always true, of course. But, there is some tendency towards truth in them.

 

What I particularly like about this article is the focus upon the distinction between the potential tablets have for increasing "INTERACTION" and the equal potential they have to increase "DISTRACTION."

 

But, really, is this about the technology itself or is it about the choices made by those who design and market the content to be accessed on those tablets?

 

In a sense it is as if one said paper-based books have the potential for intellectual stimulation AND the potential for mind rotting drival. Yes, paper and ink can be used to distribute both poetry and pornography. But, it's not the paper and ink that should be questioned but rather the choices made by those who create and market content and distribute it via paper and ink.

 

As I watch the early phases of the drift from paper and ink to digital distribution, I find myself rooting for digital while also worrying about the loss of paper and ink benefits. But, I'm also concerned about whether we will be wise enough to help direct the evolution of digital content towards its inherent potential for enhanced interaction and engagement and also wise enough to recognize that not every bell and whistle we're already seeing in the digital publishing world is increasing engagement; that many are in subtle ways increasing the potential for distractionas well.

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Washington, D.C. is ranked the most literate city in the U.S.A.

Washington, D.C. is ranked the most literate city in the U.S.A. | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
For the second year, Washington, D.C. , is ranked as the most literate city in the country.

 

 

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My reaction? I agree with the articles conclusion that we ought to be careful about what "evidence" we draw our conclusions from about the variable that determine a city's literate level.

 

Yet, at the same time, I would also be careful about assuming that the specific criteria used to determine this list are definitive.

 

Nevertheless, it's good to note that there are those who DO consider being literate to be admirable.

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Divining the winners of the 2012 Newbery, Caldecott medals

Divining the winners of the 2012 Newbery, Caldecott medals | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
Kids' Books: A look at the contenders for the best-illustrated children's book and the best-written children's book.

 

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With slight sarcastic tone...

Well even though every single morning show chose not to think this was of sufficient interest to include in their coverage this morning, I'll skip coverage of Seal and Heidi as well as the coverage of Mitt and Newt to share this with those who care more about kids.

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Memo to the Bibliophiles: Books Are a Technology Too

Memo to the Bibliophiles: Books Are a Technology Too | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
I find myself troubled by the folks who seem to treat books as a kind of idol. It is almost always associated with a notion that books are natural and an iPad is un-natural.

 

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What I like about this article is that the author takes the long view in articulating his position in the paper vs. digital book conversation. 

 

I appreciate his explanation of his own love for the paper-based reading experience preceding his comments about digital reading.

 

Maybe it is because I'm a centrist at heart, but I really don't believe that paper vs. digital needs to be an either/or conversation. 

 

I CAN understand the issues associated with the economics of publishing. Profits for paper-based publishers and for brick and morter distribution systems are being challenged. Technology has it's own challenges in "initial start-up costs." 

 

Face it, both have strengths as well as drawbacks on the economic side of the ledger. And, truthfully, both have strengths as well as drawbacks on the "reading experience" side of the ledger.

 

I guess I'm more concerned about the rising numbers of those who could care less about reading at all.

 

Those who DO read, particularly those who care about the future of reading, should spend more time promoting reading than begrudging the packaging that one uses to access reading materials. It need not be a democratic decision to impose the "least objectionable" packaging upon those who prefer "the  other" packaging.

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