Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading
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How to Analyze Literature Better by Watching Football

How to Analyze Literature Better by Watching Football | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
Learning about literature by watching football.
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:

5 Dec 2013

Well there you go!

Your thoughts? Can this unexpected take on ways to support students in their study of literature expand the paradigms within which we seek more and more effective ways to engage our students in pursuing the treasures with which Literary reading can enrich our lives?

 

Heck, I think I'll even be a more thoughtful football fan too.

 

 ~ www.GoogleLitTrips.com ~

Google Lit Trips is the legal fictitious business name for GLT Global ED, a 501c3 educational nonprofit.

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Cindy Riley Klages's curator insight, December 6, 2013 5:09 AM

War Eagle!  (Sorry, but I had to say it.)

Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading
An Educator's Reading List of Contemporary Literature, Literacy, and Reading Issues. Visit us at http://www.GoogleLitTrips.org
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400 Times William Shakespeare Totally Blew Our Minds

400 Times William Shakespeare Totally Blew Our Minds | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
The Bard's been dead 400 years, and he's still killing it.
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:
28 April 2016

I'll let the Bard speak for himself and limit my commentary to:
1. He spoke for all of us

2. He touched on a few subjects you might want to preview before sharing with students

3. Best book on Shakespeare in my mind is Bill Bryson's Shakespeare: The World as Stage an intriguing collection of stories about what we know and don't really know about Shakespeare.

And (I'm so excited) Bill Bryson was recently announced as being one of next year's speakers at the Oakland Speakers Series. Whoo hoo!

Another semi-off the subject bit of Shakespeariana.
Here in California earthquake country, the local Shakespeare outdoor Shakespeare theatre is lovingly referred to as 
Cal Shakes! (and it does!)

brought to you by GLT Global ED dba Google Lit Trips an educational nonprofit
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LeeMitchell's curator insight, April 29, 11:10 PM
Why is this news?  Because it's Shakespeare!
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The nit-picking glory of The New Yorker's Comma Queen

The nit-picking glory of The New Yorker's Comma Queen | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
"Copy editing for The New Yorker is like playing shortstop for a Major League Baseball team -- every little movement gets picked over by the critics," says Mary Norris, who has played the position for more than thirty years. In that time, she's gotten a reputation for sternness and for being a "comma maniac," but this is unfounded, she says. Above all, her work is aimed at one thing: making authors look good. Explore The New Yorker's distinctive style with the person who knows it best in this charming talk.
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:
16 April 2016

I found this Ted Talk by a copy editor for the New Yorker fascinating on a number of accounts. 

1. She does not take herself too seriously (whew!)
2. She takes her job incredibly seriously (love that too!)
3. She makes it clear that even the best writers may not be experts at grammar and/or usage.
4. There is room for differences of opinions regarding best grammar and/or usage

And, all of this from a copy editor for the New Yorker; certainly a publication with impressive "creds!"

brought to you by GLT Global ED dba Google Lit Trips, an educational nonprofit
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Why Emotions Have a Place in English Class

Why Emotions Have a Place in English Class | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
Grappling with the way books make students feel—not just analytical skills—should be part of the high-school English curriculum.
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:
13 April 2016
Up Front: I found this article quite refreshing in it's handling of teaching literature and ELA Common Core, as it addresses both some of the important concerns I have about the focus of the ELA Common Core Standards as well as one of my favorite aspects of the ELA Common Core Standards. 

 happen to like the treating of both Literary Reading and Informational Reading as different, but essential reading skill sets. And, if handled skillfully, each skill set can bring an important "value add" to the other; this being one of the core elements of the Google Lit Trips project vision. 

 Fiction set in the real world by definition seamlessly blends the value of literary reading's appeal to both the head and heart with the real world value of cross-curricular real world informational reading. 

I finished reading this article feeling justified in my reservations about the Common Core's misdirection of the value of Literary Reading, as well as justified in my appreciation for the benefits to be had by the skillful blending of the very different skills sets of both literary and informational reading into an enlightenment and understanding that reaches above and beyond that of either skill set alone. It's not a tug of war, but a cooperative pairing if done well .

 brought to you by GLT Global ED dba Google Lit Trips, an educational nonprofit.
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GoogleLitTrips Reading List's curator insight, April 13, 9:04 PM
13 April 2016

Up Front: I found this article quite refreshing in it's handling of teaching literature and ELA Common Core, as it addresses both some of the important concerns I have about the focus of the ELA Common Core Standards as well as one of my favorite aspects of the ELA Common Core Standards.

 I happen to like the treating of both Literary Reading and Informational Reading as different, but essential reading skill sets. And, if handled skillfully, each skill set can bring an important "value add" to the other; this being one of the core elements of the Google Lit Trips project vision. 

Fiction set in the real world by definition seamlessly blends the value of literary reading's appeal to both the head and heart with the real world value of cross-curricular real world informational reading. I finished reading this article feeling justified in my reservations about the Common Core's misdirection of the value of Literary Reading, as well as justified in my appreciation for the benefits to be had by skillful blending the very different skills sets of both literary and informational reading into an enlightenment and understanding that reaches above and beyond that of either skill set alone. 

It's not a tug of war, but a cooperative pairing if done well


brought to you by GLT Global ED dba Google Lit Trips, an educational nonprofit.
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New Google Lit Trip Published!

New Google Lit Trip Published! | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
Google Lit Trips, educational nonprofit, award winning, educational technology, place based storytelling, reading about reading
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:
11 April 2016

Announcing the publication of a brand new Google Lit Trip for The Lamp, the Ice, and the Boat Called Fish by Jaqueline Briggs Martin. 

Set in the Arctic Circle, this book is based on a true story of the last Voyage of the Karluk, Aleutian for "fish." The Karluk and its crew were joined by an Iñupiaq family and their two young daughters. Through the Iñupaiq family we learn much about the culture of the Inuit people. But, along the way, the Karluk runs into serious trouble and we find ourselves learning about an important event in history as we hope for the survival of the crew and its passengers. In this Google Lit Trip we have blended media and information about Iñupiaq culture and the actual historical events of the story.

You might want to bring a Parka along on this Lit Trip!

Also in celebration of National Poetry month we're pointing visitors towards a very interesting student developed Lit Trip feature 15 of her favorite poets. Locations represent the poets' birthplaces. Includes audio links to the student reading a favorite poem by each poet.

brought to you by GLT Global ED dba Google Lit Trips an educational nonprofit

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Empathy Doesn't Make You a Good Person

Empathy Doesn't Make You a Good Person | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
From a moral standpoint, it makes the world worse.
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:
8 April 2016

Oh my! One of the most powerful defenses for the value of literary reading has always been its ability to promote the development of empathy. 

And then, while searching for something worthy of scooping, I came across the title of this short video. "Empathy Doesn't Make You a Good Person," and published in The Atlantic, one of my "Go To" sources for thought provoking pieces? 

How could this be?

My first thought was a recollection of one of my personal guide post quotes when confronting what appears to seriously contradict one of my most strongly held beliefs.
_____
"It's a rare person who wants to hear what he doesn't want to hear." ~ Dick Cavett
_____

Could there be an "aha" moment; an "I never thought about it that way before" realization to be discovered in the video?

By the way, this concept that I could be wrong or at least responsible for modifying an existing belief was at the heart of my favorite requirement for a well developed argumentative essay; the required concession paragraph. 

So, I watched the video.

My attention was caught in the argument that empathy has a serious downside if it is actually deeply felt and then quickly abandoned once the passion subsides. I realized I could not argue with some of the evidence provided. 

I'll leave you to weigh the evidence provided in defense of the thesis that empathy can blind us by distorting our perception of what is important, what altruistic actions really make a difference, and the penetrating question of the shortfall of what is referred to as the reward of "warm glow altruism," which I had to consider might be more self-serving (self-delusional) than helpful in addressing issues for which we feel an intense, but often fleeting empathetic rush.

OKAY, I had to admit that there are issues associated with empathy's value IN SOME CASES. We've seen the student suddenly sensing the college application pressure to have some,community service to pad one's application.  Yet that community service pressure for some often is minimal or "fly-by" and motivated more by self-serving purposes than by actual empathy for others.

We've seen catastrophe generate intense but short-lived interest in the well-being of those existing in impoverished conditions or in the conditions behind our increasingly NOT rare encounters with gun violence, or even in the actual importance of honesty in public discourse as we "ready our opinions" for pending elections? 

How though could I still find myself concluding that the video's conclusions do not fairly address the value of empathy? 

I came to think of the argument as being similar to a frequent discussion of optimism in many, many class discussions in my satire class. 

As there is a difference between fleeting empathy and deeper ongoing empathetic efforts to "really" make a difference, there is a similar difference between what I referred to as "Panglossian optimism" and what I referred to "Martin Luther King optimism."

Pangloss from Voltaire's Candide, represents a rose-colored lens-type optimism believing that everything is for the best. This led Pangloss to defend what "appears" to be bad by providing extremely ludicrous explanations of why the bad is actually good and therefore requires nothing of us. 

Martin Luther King on the other hand stared what is bad directly in the eye and worked incessantly to make what is bad better. His optimism was essentially, "Yes there is bad, therefore I believe something can and must be done." 

The connection I see? Let us admit that a Panglossian-like low level of empathy can lead to a certain self-delusion and bias that might actually cause a distraction away from recognizing that more must be done than "fly-by" acts of kindness.

And, let us also remember that developing empathy at deeper and more realistic levels, requires us to accept a responsibility to make the cultivation of of empathy a serious Martin Luther King-like driving force within our moral compasses.

And, life-long literary reading, just might be the force that continually reminds us to care in ways that make a real difference.

brought to you by GLT Global ED dba Google Lit Trips an educational nonprofit


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Why boys should read girl books

Why boys should read girl books | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
Caroline Paul wrote "The Gutsy Girl." Some people think boys shouldn't have to read it. She explains why she thinks this is a problem.
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:
2 April 2015

For your consideration. Just wondering what YOUR thoughts might be on how best to address the underlying important issue at the heart of this article. 

I'm convinced it's not a one side vs. the other kind of solution. 

I keep going back to Vygotsky's Zone of Proximal Development. What literature DO WE or COULD WE include at various grade levels that both boys and girls might find interesting while taking them into deeper considerations of the complexities of "other gender" understandings and appreciations?

I'm thinking of what books might appear in a Venn diagram of books that many girls find engaging and books that many boys find engaging. 

What a golden opportunity it might be to pay attention to the titles in the Venn cross-over. 

Any titles come to mind? 



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Samiyah Rankins's curator insight, April 4, 12:31 AM
I chose this article because I was interested in what the author was going to say. I wasn't sure the direction it would go in or the point/relevance. Now, I'm glad I read it. It's very interesting because I had never thought about the types of books children read growing up or in the classroom. Every book I can remember that I read for school did not have a female hero. Society today is trying its best to equalize men and women but it starts within the school systems. I was shocked that boys were excused from an assembly about a "girl book" but it's actually believable. You can learn a lot from reading, especially if it's about things you don't know about. Young boys aren't always taught that girls can be heroes too and I'm sure they're interested in whats inside the "girl book". It's up to the school system, the teachers and parents to educate them. Girls are forced to read about a boy saving the girl's life so why can't it be the other way around? 
Amanda Eve Avila's curator insight, April 5, 5:08 PM
In the article, “Why boys should read girl book” it explains why boys should read girl books. This article was really interesting for me and I enjoyed it. It is true that boys only think they could read “manly” books and girl books are excluded for them to read. I believe that it is true if boys do not read girl books then they will lack empathy. In the “boy” books, boys are taught to be strong and are more important then girls. I think dos should learn that females are just as important as males. It is sad that all these years boys have been told not to read girl books even though it would be beneficial later on in their lives. I never thought about this situation until reading and it definitely is true. I hope that teachers and parents will motivate their children to read and that it doesn't matter the type of book.
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Historical Fiction Gets No Respect -- Here's Why It Should

Historical Fiction Gets No Respect -- Here's Why It Should | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
Katy Simpson Smith, author of the new novel 'Free Men,' on the joys and frustrations of exploring the past.
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:
1 April 2016

Yesterday I scooped an article entitled "Fiction v nonfiction – English literature's made-up divide." In my comments, while recognizing some of the benefits, I expressed concerns about the downside of genre classifications in the classroom.

When I came across this article, it seemed perfect follow-up evidence that genre classifications can have deleterious  impact upon readers by passing on the de facto bias of literary scholarship to students who may not be on track to become Literature majors. 

A question arose in my mind...
If we who teach literature teachers were evaluated upon the following two criteria, would we consider our efforts successful?
1. What percentage of our students grow up to be Literature teachers, scholars, or some kind of literati-type?
2. What percentage of our students become completely turned off as life-long readers specifically because of the esoteric nature of our efforts to have them read literature like scholars do?

Of, course the fallacy of my reducing the assessment of our efforts to these two categories, overlooks what we hope is still a significantly large portion of our students; that group that does not grow up to be literature scholars, but does gain a depth of appreciation for what they do read that does motivate them to become lifelong readers. 

That concession being made, ironically, I am reminded of Howard Zinn's A People's History of the United States, a powerful attack on established tendency of curricula in universities that tends to pass on the biases of historical events taught in schools, from generation to generation, rather than to encourage a reconsideration of those often un-reconsidered biases to see if perhaps Custer was not so much of a hero as we had previously taught our students that he had been.

Transitioning the thought to the literary arts, we have made progress in reconsidering the long held biases that previously held reign in literary curricula. Consider the reduction in assumption that the "Dead White Poets" were worth more than women writers, writers of color, and cross-cultural global writers. 

But, to see educators still passing on biases implying or outright accusing genres such as science fiction, historical fiction, YA lit, as being "entirely" second rate at best by some sort of "default fault" is doing not only harm to our students who we hope to become life-long readers regardless of their eventual career decisions, but ironically even to those we hope will choose to become bearers of the literary torch who I personally, would hope would not enter future classroom, noses aloft, telling students that what they like to read is essentially trash or unworthy just because "those types" of books have always been under appreciated by too many university curricula planners.

Let us not throw a "one-size-fits-all" blanket of condemnation over historical fiction, science, fiction, YA and any other "genres" who have been so condemned. 

brought to you by GLT Global ED dba Google Lit Trips an educational nonprofit. 


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Lynnette Van Dyke's curator insight, April 2, 1:32 AM
1 April 2016

Yesterday I scooped an article entitled "Fiction v nonfiction – English literature's made-up divide." In my comments, while recognizing some of the benefits, I expressed concerns about the downside of genre classifications in the classroom.

When I came across this article, it seemed perfect follow-up evidence that genre classifications can have deleterious  impact upon readers by passing on the de facto bias of literary scholarship to students who may not be on track to become Literature majors. 

A question arose in my mind...
If we who teach literature teachers were evaluated upon the following two criteria, would we consider our efforts successful?
1. What percentage of our students grow up to be Literature teachers, scholars, or some kind of literati-type?
2. What percentage of our students become completely turned off as life-long readers specifically because of the esoteric nature of our efforts to have them read literature like scholars do?

Of, course the fallacy of my reducing the assessment of our efforts to these two categories, overlooks what we hope is still a significantly large portion of our students; that group that does not grow up to be literature scholars, but does gain a depth of appreciation for what they do read that does motivate them to become lifelong readers. 

That concession being made, ironically, I am reminded of Howard Zinn's A People's History of the United States, a powerful attack on established tendency of curricula in universities that tends to pass on the biases of historical events taught in schools, from generation to generation, rather than to encourage a reconsideration of those often un-reconsidered biases to see if perhaps Custer was not so much of a hero as we had previously taught our students that he had been.

Transitioning the thought to the literary arts, we have made progress in reconsidering the long held biases that previously held reign in literary curricula. Consider the reduction in assumption that the "Dead White Poets" were worth more than women writers, writers of color, and cross-cultural global writers. 

But, to see educators still passing on biases implying or outright accusing genres such as science fiction, historical fiction, YA lit, as being "entirely" second rate at best by some sort of "default fault" is doing not only harm to our students who we hope to become life-long readers regardless of their eventual career decisions, but ironically even to those we hope will choose to become bearers of the literary torch who I personally, would hope would not enter future classroom, noses aloft, telling students that what they like to read is essentially trash or unworthy just because "those types" of books have always been under appreciated by too many university curricula planners.

Let us not throw a "one-size-fits-all" blanket of condemnation over historical fiction, science, fiction, YA and any other "genres" who have been so condemned. 

brought to you by GLT Global ED dba Google Lit Trips an educational nonprofit. 


Melanie Hundley's curator insight, April 3, 2:05 PM
1 April 2016

Yesterday I scooped an article entitled "Fiction v nonfiction – English literature's made-up divide." In my comments, while recognizing some of the benefits, I expressed concerns about the downside of genre classifications in the classroom.

When I came across this article, it seemed perfect follow-up evidence that genre classifications can have deleterious  impact upon readers by passing on the de facto bias of literary scholarship to students who may not be on track to become Literature majors. 

A question arose in my mind...
If we who teach literature teachers were evaluated upon the following two criteria, would we consider our efforts successful?
1. What percentage of our students grow up to be Literature teachers, scholars, or some kind of literati-type?
2. What percentage of our students become completely turned off as life-long readers specifically because of the esoteric nature of our efforts to have them read literature like scholars do?

Of, course the fallacy of my reducing the assessment of our efforts to these two categories, overlooks what we hope is still a significantly large portion of our students; that group that does not grow up to be literature scholars, but does gain a depth of appreciation for what they do read that does motivate them to become lifelong readers. 

That concession being made, ironically, I am reminded of Howard Zinn's A People's History of the United States, a powerful attack on established tendency of curricula in universities that tends to pass on the biases of historical events taught in schools, from generation to generation, rather than to encourage a reconsideration of those often un-reconsidered biases to see if perhaps Custer was not so much of a hero as we had previously taught our students that he had been.

Transitioning the thought to the literary arts, we have made progress in reconsidering the long held biases that previously held reign in literary curricula. Consider the reduction in assumption that the "Dead White Poets" were worth more than women writers, writers of color, and cross-cultural global writers. 

But, to see educators still passing on biases implying or outright accusing genres such as science fiction, historical fiction, YA lit, as being "entirely" second rate at best by some sort of "default fault" is doing not only harm to our students who we hope to become life-long readers regardless of their eventual career decisions, but ironically even to those we hope will choose to become bearers of the literary torch who I personally, would hope would not enter future classroom, noses aloft, telling students that what they like to read is essentially trash or unworthy just because "those types" of books have always been under appreciated by too many university curricula planners.

Let us not throw a "one-size-fits-all" blanket of condemnation over historical fiction, science, fiction, YA and any other "genres" who have been so condemned. 

brought to you by GLT Global ED dba Google Lit Trips an educational nonprofit. 


Luke Padilla's curator insight, April 4, 6:38 PM
1 April 2016

Yesterday I scooped an article entitled "Fiction v nonfiction – English literature's made-up divide." In my comments, while recognizing some of the benefits, I expressed concerns about the downside of genre classifications in the classroom.

When I came across this article, it seemed perfect follow-up evidence that genre classifications can have deleterious  impact upon readers by passing on the de facto bias of literary scholarship to students who may not be on track to become Literature majors. 

A question arose in my mind...
If we who teach literature teachers were evaluated upon the following two criteria, would we consider our efforts successful?
1. What percentage of our students grow up to be Literature teachers, scholars, or some kind of literati-type?
2. What percentage of our students become completely turned off as life-long readers specifically because of the esoteric nature of our efforts to have them read literature like scholars do?

Of, course the fallacy of my reducing the assessment of our efforts to these two categories, overlooks what we hope is still a significantly large portion of our students; that group that does not grow up to be literature scholars, but does gain a depth of appreciation for what they do read that does motivate them to become lifelong readers. 

That concession being made, ironically, I am reminded of Howard Zinn's A People's History of the United States, a powerful attack on established tendency of curricula in universities that tends to pass on the biases of historical events taught in schools, from generation to generation, rather than to encourage a reconsideration of those often un-reconsidered biases to see if perhaps Custer was not so much of a hero as we had previously taught our students that he had been.

Transitioning the thought to the literary arts, we have made progress in reconsidering the long held biases that previously held reign in literary curricula. Consider the reduction in assumption that the "Dead White Poets" were worth more than women writers, writers of color, and cross-cultural global writers. 

But, to see educators still passing on biases implying or outright accusing genres such as science fiction, historical fiction, YA lit, as being "entirely" second rate at best by some sort of "default fault" is doing not only harm to our students who we hope to become life-long readers regardless of their eventual career decisions, but ironically even to those we hope will choose to become bearers of the literary torch who I personally, would hope would not enter future classroom, noses aloft, telling students that what they like to read is essentially trash or unworthy just because "those types" of books have always been under appreciated by too many university curricula planners.

Let us not throw a "one-size-fits-all" blanket of condemnation over historical fiction, science, fiction, YA and any other "genres" who have been so condemned. 

brought to you by GLT Global ED dba Google Lit Trips an educational nonprofit. 


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Literature, empathy and the moral imagination

Great works of literature are often love-letters to the form itself, but moral philosophy has rarely taken story-telling seriously. The work of Martha Nussbaum shows that the novel is key to social justice, through the role that reading plays in developing our moral imagination
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:
31 March 2016

Regular readers of this scoop.it collection know that I have often scooped article specifically addressing the positive impact of literary reading. The role of literature's influence on the development of empathy is one of the more commonly referenced benefits. When I saw the title of this particular article, I was captivated by the term "the moral imagination." The role of the development of one's "moral compass" is also often referenced, but the term "moral imagination" had not to my recollection previously come to my attention. And, I was immediately intrigued.

WOW! The discovery of this article proved itself serendipitous at virtually every turn. It is not a long article and worthy of a slow and contemplative consideration. 

My advise? Don't skim. Take your time. It's a treasure chest of of a defense of literature's value to humanity.

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Fiction v nonfiction – English literature's made-up divide

Fiction v nonfiction – English literature's made-up divide | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
Some cultures do not distinguish between fiction and nonfiction – and instead talk of ‘stories’. Is that a barrier to English-language writers and publishers? Or should they just learn to enjoy telling tales?
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:
31 March 2016

I found this article fascinating in that I had no idea that in multiple cultures there is no distinction between fiction and nonfiction. 

A confession. Though somewhat useful when meandering around the library or bookstore without a  particular title in mind, just because I felt like picking up a book or two to read, I've had doubts about the importance of tagging books by their genre or categorization labels. 

It started with a teacher who criticized me because I confessed on the first day of class that I was an Ian Fleming fan have read more than one, but not many more than one James Bond book. Fleming was essentially the first author of whom I had read multiple novels. It was subconscious at best, but becoming an author fan took me to another level of literary appreciation. It was no longer merely a good plot that determined my interest. I realized that authors have distinctive styles and themes. Fleming took me to a new level of appreciate for reading. That teacher pushed that new level into the closet by telling me that Flemings was trash.

Ironically, though I secretly kept reading Flemings, I carried a bit of shame in the possibility of being caught reading trash. And, because of that it was many years before I even gave science fiction a chance, given that it too was often deemed unworthy of being called literature. 

But, about the distinction between fiction and nonfiction. I have learned quite a lot of facts from nonfiction and quite a lot of TRUTHS from fiction. But, I've always been just a bit leery about the gap between a books full of facts and the interpretations of those facts being suggested by their authors. I am not a conspiracist who assumes that nonfiction is probably unreliable. But, when I was a kid, my history book told me that George Custer was an American hero. When I was a young teacher visiting friends in Virginia I was shown their daughter's Virginia History book  that claimed there was no Civil War (it was a disturbance between the states) and that the South had won it because it was the south that had the courage to first cease hostilities.

Is it a fair question to wonder whether there isn't some degree of bias cherry picking in all history books? Or, can we really say that nonfiction by definition should be accepted as telling 
"the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth"?

(odd transition) When I taught journalism, there were rules. Opinion went on the editorial page. News went on the news pages. Both were considered nonfiction. The distinction being that Editorials allowed for cherry picking facts and a certain level of questionable yet often loud self-righteousness.

Those rules seem to have relaxed a bit "if you really want to know the truth" as Donald Trump might suggest when he refers to "Obamacare" as a "complete disaster."

Yet, flipping the coin raises the question of what are sometimes referred to as the "eternal truths" expressed in fiction. Voltaire, Twain, Orwell, Vonnegut and so many others put the costume of fiction on their articulations of "the way it is."

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Google Lit Trips: Reading and Writing - Simplek12

Google Lit Trips: Reading and Writing - Simplek12 | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
Google Lit Trips is a resource that allows teachers to show their students the real world locations of their favorite stories and characters.
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:
30 March 2016

Always nice to discover unsolicited support for the Google Lit Trips project.
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Lynnette Van Dyke's curator insight, March 31, 1:09 AM
30 March 2016

Always nice to discover unsolicited support for the Google Lit Trips project.
Rescooped by GoogleLitTrips Reading List from Reading About Reading
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Students as Explorers: Using Google Earth with Literature

Students as Explorers: Using Google Earth with Literature | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
How to use Google Earth to make literature relevant for students.
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:
3 March 2016

Happy to announce the publication of my blog post for  Education Week at the invitation Heather Singmaster of the Asia Society.

Register at http://www.googlelittrips.org for quick and easy access to our library of Google Lit Trips.

Reminder, Google Lit Trips resources are free.
However, you are always welcome to  to support our efforts and express your appreciation with a paypal donation. 

Short paypal URL: https://goo.gl/XtUvrc

brought to you by GLT Global ED an educational nonprofit also known as Google Lit Trips.
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GoogleLitTrips Reading List's curator insight, March 3, 8:20 PM
3 March 2016

Happy to announce the publication of my blog post for  Education Week at the invitation Heather Singmaster of the Asia Society.

Register at http://www.googlelittrips.org for quick and easy access to our library of Google Lit Trips.

Reminder, Google Lit Trips resources are free.
However, you are always welcome to  to support our efforts and express your appreciation with a paypal donation. 

Short paypal URL: https://goo.gl/XtUvrc

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Tannis Niziol's curator insight, March 14, 8:22 PM
3 March 2016
 
Happy to announce the publication of my blog post for  Education Week at the invitation Heather Singmaster of the Asia Society.
 
Register at http://www.googlelittrips.org for quick and easy access to our library of Google Lit Trips.
 
Reminder, Google Lit Trips resources are free.
However, you are always welcome to  to support our efforts and express your appreciation with a paypal donation. 
 
Short paypal URL: https://goo.gl/XtUvrc
 
brought to you by GLT Global ED an educational nonprofit also known as Google Lit Trips.
Lynnette Van Dyke's curator insight, March 26, 11:14 AM
3 March 2016

Happy to announce the publication of my blog post for  Education Week at the invitation Heather Singmaster of the Asia Society.

Register at http://www.googlelittrips.org for quick and easy access to our library of Google Lit Trips.

Reminder, Google Lit Trips resources are free.
However, you are always welcome to  to support our efforts and express your appreciation with a paypal donation. 

Short paypal URL: https://goo.gl/XtUvrc

brought to you by GLT Global ED an educational nonprofit also known as Google Lit Trips.
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NEW! The Catcher in the Rye Google Lit Trip

NEW! The Catcher in the Rye Google Lit Trip | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it

We're celebrating the publication of the Google Lit Trip for The Catcher in the Rye by J. D. Salinger

GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:

26 January 2016

 

        "Gin a body meet a body, comin thro' the rye, 
            Gin a body kiss a body, need a body cry; 
              Ilka body has a body, ne'er a ane hae I; 
      But a' the lads they loe me, and what the waur am I.
 

Only hours after the celebration of Robert Burns Night (http://goo.gl/5RRb7B), we are proud to announce the publication of the long awaited Google Lit Trip for The Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger!

 

If you haven't yet, it would be a great time to visit our newly redesigned website. Same URL GoogleLitTrips.org 

 

The other good news? We've added a one-time member registration so you won't have to fill out the download survey every time you download a resource.

 

 

 ~ www.GoogleLitTrips.org ~

brought to you by GLT Global ED dba Google Lit Trips a 501c3 educational nonprofit

 

 

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Adriana Zoder's curator insight, March 25, 10:43 AM

26 January 2016

 

        "Gin a body meet a body, comin thro' the rye, 
            Gin a body kiss a body, need a body cry; 
              Ilka body has a body, ne'er a ane hae I; 
      But a' the lads they loe me, and what the waur am I.
 

Only hours after the celebration of Robert Burns Night (http://goo.gl/5RRb7B), we are proud to announce the publication of the long awaited Google Lit Trip for The Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger!

 

If you haven't yet, it would be a great time to visit our newly redesigned website. Same URL GoogleLitTrips.org 

 

The other good news? We've added a one-time member registration so you won't have to fill out the download survey every time you download a resource.

 

 

 ~ www.GoogleLitTrips.org ~

brought to you by GLT Global ED dba Google Lit Trips a 501c3 educational nonprofit

 

 

Lynnette Van Dyke's curator insight, March 26, 11:14 AM

26 January 2016

 

        "Gin a body meet a body, comin thro' the rye, 
            Gin a body kiss a body, need a body cry; 
              Ilka body has a body, ne'er a ane hae I; 
      But a' the lads they loe me, and what the waur am I.
 

Only hours after the celebration of Robert Burns Night (http://goo.gl/5RRb7B), we are proud to announce the publication of the long awaited Google Lit Trip for The Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger!

 

If you haven't yet, it would be a great time to visit our newly redesigned website. Same URL GoogleLitTrips.org 

 

The other good news? We've added a one-time member registration so you won't have to fill out the download survey every time you download a resource.

 

 

 ~ www.GoogleLitTrips.org ~

brought to you by GLT Global ED dba Google Lit Trips a 501c3 educational nonprofit

 

 

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32-Second Video of a Hardback in a University’s Rare Books Collection Goes Viral — See What’s ‘Hidden’ in Its Pages

32-Second Video of a Hardback in a University’s Rare Books Collection Goes Viral — See What’s ‘Hidden’ in Its Pages | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
Look at this book. Seems like just an old-fashioned hardback with gilt pages, right? If you were to shift the closed pages of the book just so, you'd see ... well, take a look at the video posted by Cornell University Library's Rare Books...
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:

2 December 2015

 

This is so cool. I won't spoil the surprise. Let's just say great books held treasures to be discovered. In these rare cases, the treasure is hidden in the gold.

 

TEASE: Notice the 32 second video has had over 5 MILLION views!

 

But, don't miss the video lower on the page. It's a historical gem. 

Wouldn't I love to have one of these in my collection! 

 

 ~ www.GoogleLitTrips.org ~

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Lego Marks Anniversary Of Shakespeare's Death In Typically Awesome Way

Lego Marks Anniversary Of Shakespeare's Death In Typically Awesome Way | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
The Danish company used stop motion animation to recreate the Bard's most iconic scenes.
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:
22 April 2016

This is pretty darned cool! Gotta watch the video and then watch it again, and again, and, well as cool as it is you've probably got chores to get to sometime today.

Happy B-Day to "Shaka-spee-air-ray." 

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Go ahead, make up new words!

Go ahead, make up new words! | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
In this fun, short talk from TEDYouth, lexicographer Erin McKean encourages — nay, cheerleads — her audience to create new words when the existing ones won’t quite do. She lists out 6 ways to make new words in English, from compounding to “verbing,” in order to make language better at expressing what we mean, and to create more ways for us to understand one another.
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:
16 April 2016

A charming, sometimes hilarious, and thought provoking short talk about the way new words develop. Interesting breakdown of different categories of ways new words are created.

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Shakespeare First Folio discovered on Scottish island - BBC News

Shakespeare First Folio discovered on Scottish island - BBC News | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
Oxford University academics discover a first collected edition of Shakespeare's plays in a Scottish stately home.
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:
12 April 2016

All I can say is "I'll be darned." As an English major this is of MAJOR interest.

To students not inclined to become English majors, perhaps the interest, if any is modest.

But to those of us who care as deeply as we do it is "blow your mind" exciting that such discoveries are still to be hoped for.

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GoogleLitTrips Reading List's curator insight, April 13, 3:09 AM
12 April 2016

All I can say is "I'll be darned." As an English major this is of MAJOR interest.

To students not inclined to become English majors, perhaps the interest, if any is modest.

But to those of us who care as deeply as we do it is "blow your mind" exciting that such discoveries are still to be hoped for.


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Google GTI - California 2016

Google GTI - California 2016 | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
Information on the Google Geo Teachers Institute to be hosted at the Google Campus, Mountain View, CA.
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:
8 April 2016
Fans of Google Lit Trips and / or any educational integration of Google Mapping Tools might want to consider applying for the 2016 Google Geo Teachers Institute to be held July 25-26, 2016 at the Google Campus in Mountain View, CA. 

The two-day institute is free though space is limited. So, if it is of interest consider applying ASAP. The Institute is free* to anyone. However, space is limited so get your applications in quickly. 

Deadline: All applications submitted by 30th April will receive equal consideration. Applications after that date will be processed if spaces remain available.
 
 Google Lit Trips Founder Jerome Burg along with an All-Star team of Google Mapping experts will present a full two-day institute of sessions focusing upon educational integrations of all Google mapping tools. 

 If you're a Google Lit Trip fan, let me know if you get accepted. (Jerome@GoogleLitTrips.org) I'm always excited to meet fans in person. 

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Language as Art in Pittsburgh

Language as Art in Pittsburgh | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
Exiled writers use words as art and inspire a community.
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:
4 April 2016

What a totally very cool idea! Be sure to click on the link to City of Asylum from which comes the following...

 "City of Asylum creates a thriving community for writers, readers, and neighbors. We provide sanctuary to endangered literary writers, so that they can continue to write and their voices are not silenced." 

 Don't miss this short video on the City of Asylum website: http://cityofasylum.org/about/ ;

 My regret? Just two years ago, I spent a few days in Pittsburgh speaking about the Google Lit Trips project at a Geo-Teachers Institute and had not heard of this project. So close, and I missed it. ARGH! 

 Anyone out there from Pittsburgh interested in developing a "Literary Locations" project about this for publication on the Google Lit Trips site? Let's talk. (Jerome@GoogleLItTrips.org) 

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You Know What Red Food Dye Is Made Of, Right?

You Know What Red Food Dye Is Made Of, Right? | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
Red velvet cupcakes will never be the same again.
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:
1 April 2016

Okay, this is not an April Fool's joke. However, it is a fun story and reminded me of an always favorite day while teaching Candide in the satire class I taught for over three years.

Ironically, the recollection is of a quote made by Candide's teacher Pangloss who is one of literature's most foolish of fools; most often expressed in his naively optimistic teaching that "This is the best of all possible worlds. Everything happens for the best."

In one particularly bizarre episode, Pangloss returns to the story suffering from a sexually transmitted disease that he believes he contracted while in South America (of course, history that used to record that sexually transmitted diseases traveled "from" new world natives "to" European travelers rather than in the reverse direction which science has since verified.)

Anyway, in spite of the serious impact that the disease has wrought upon Pangloss, rather than revisit his opinions about everything happening for the best, he pre-empts that consideration that he might be wrong with this defense when asked if the devil might be the force behind his illness...

""Not at all," replied this great man, "it was a thing unavoidable, a necessary ingredient in the best of worlds; for if Columbus had not in an island of America caught this disease, which contaminates the source of life, frequently even hinders generation, and which is evidently opposed to the great end of nature, we should have neither chocolate nor cochineal..."

Imagine the look on my student's faces when after reading this passage I would casually pour myself a glass of cranberry juice and open a box of Red Hot Tamales candies and then explain to them that cochineal indeed was the product of squashed bugs and that it was the most common way to produce the red dye for clothing and many foods.

You might find this article (http://www.livescience.com/36292-red-food-dye-bugs-cochineal-carmine.html) indicating that it is for this reason that Starbucks ceased using cochineal in its Strawberries and Creme Frappachino mix most recently referred to as either carmine, cochineal, or Red Dye #4. 

When did they stop serving food colored with squashed bugs? 2012!!! 

And did you know that Starbucks was ahead of the curve? It wasn't until 2013 that alternatives to Red dye 4 were being sought for Danon and Yoplait yogurts, by Tropicana for its fruit juices, Nestle's for Nesquik strawberry chocolate cookies, by Betty Crocker for its Red Velvet Cake Mix, and by Rainbow for its Mentos candy AND in thousands of other common foods such as fake crab and lobster, fruit cocktail cherries, port wine cheese, lumpfish eggs/caviar and liqueurs, candies, ice creams, processed foods and beverages, as well as in drugs and cosmetics.

Besides the thought of eating squashed insects, it turned out that many people are allergic to cochineal and vegetarians found the news particularly revolting.


On a more pleasant note...
For the record, those of you might teach Candide should know that the Candide Google Lit Trip has very recently had a rather significant updating.

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The NRA Finally Makes Fairy Tales Child-Friendly By Adding Guns

The NRA Finally Makes Fairy Tales Child-Friendly By Adding Guns | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
Valuable life lesson: Guns prevent stranger danger, being eaten by witches, and bloodshed. Er ... what?
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:
1 April 2016

I can only hope this is an April Fools (unfunny) "joke." However, given the current (lack of) "quality" in public discourse regarding gun rights and other controversial topics where difference of opinion are often expressed more in volume than in substance, it is hard to tell whether or not this is actually a joke or not.

Whether or not this is an actual true article, for those fighting the tug of war between the importance of literary reading vs informational reading, remember we need not look far to see that there is much important work to be done in improving our understanding of the value and importance of each.

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Flurries Unlimited's curator insight, April 1, 9:37 PM
1 April 2016
 
I can only hope this is an April Fools (unfunny) "joke." However, given the current (lack of) "quality" in public discourse regarding gun rights and other controversial topics where difference of opinion are often expressed more in volume than in substance, it is hard to tell whether or not this is actually a joke or not.
 
Whether or not this is an actual true article, for those fighting the tug of war between the importance of literary reading vs informational reading, remember we need not look far to see that there is much important work to be done in improving our understanding of the value and importance of each.
 
brought to you by GLT Global ED dba Google Lit Trips an educational nonprofit
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The Interactivity Center

The Interactivity Center | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
The Interactivity Center
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:
31 March 2016

Proud to be among education world's recommendations in The Interactivity Center that features  collaborative projects, virtual field trips, educational games, and other interactive activities.

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20 Bands Named After Classic Literature

20 Bands Named After Classic Literature | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:
31 March 2016

As they say "Hope Springs Eternal." The literary influence of literature in popular music is a good sign. Okay, I was only aware of a small number of these bands. But truthfully that enhances my joy in that I am happy to see that much of the contemporary music scene with which I have limited experience is populated by musicians finding inspiration in the reading.

Though the article contains "only" 20 Bands Named After Classic Literature," (some of which may or may not qualify under a strict definition of "Classic") don't miss reading many additional literary titles added to the list in the comment section.

It just feels good that classic or otherwise, reading has a place of honor among those bringing music to their many fans.

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Why You May Be Seeing Stacks Of Books All Over NYC

Why You May Be Seeing Stacks Of Books All Over NYC | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
“The people who’ve taken part in the project are now connected to me in this weird [but good] way."
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:
30 March 2016

I've always been intrigued by conceptual art. Stacks of books left, beautifully photographed and .... and what?

What became of them? 

"Shaheryar Malik has left stacks of books from his own library at popular destinations all over New York City. He doesn’t stick around to see if anyone takes one of his books, nor does he re-visit his stacks. Instead he leaves a bookmark with his email address printed on it inside each book, in the hopes that he’ll hear back from whomever decided to pick that book up."

So many stories and the unknown stories of what became of those stories. How many lives did each story live? And how many lives were touched in how many ways? 

Had you come across one of these remarkable stacks, what do you imagine you might have done? 

Gosh, I sure do love a great mystery!

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Harper Lee, Author of ‘To Kill a Mockingbird,’ Dies at 89

Harper Lee, Author of ‘To Kill a Mockingbird,’ Dies at 89 | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
Ms. Lee’s novel about racial injustice in a small Alabama town became one of the most beloved and most taught works of fiction ever written by an American.
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:

19 February 2016

 

Perhaps the source of many of the most moving moments in my entire teaching career. 

 

Enough said. May she rest in peace and her legacy rest upon the greatness of To Kill A Mockingbird.

 

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Lynnette Van Dyke's curator insight, March 26, 11:13 AM

19 February 2016

 

Perhaps the source of many of the most moving moments in my entire teaching career. 

 

Enough said. May she rest in peace and her legacy rest upon the greatness of To Kill A Mockingbird.

 

 ~ www.GoogleLitTrips.org ~

brought to you by GLT Global ED an educational nonprofit dba GoogleLitTrips

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High School Removes ‘Huckleberry Finn’ Over Portrayal Of Blacks

High School Removes ‘Huckleberry Finn’ Over Portrayal Of Blacks | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
Racial slurs in Mark Twain's 1885 classic are said to make some students uncomfortable.
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:

14 December 2015

 

WHY??? Officially because Mark Twain's insistence upon using the N-word "makes some students uncomfortable."

 

My question and challenge is, "Why isn't The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn taught in every single high school?"  Why in the world would I take that position? 

 

Because "Black Lives Matter too!"

 

What??? Consider...
Ever notice that the only "good" character from beginning to end is Jim, the runaway slave?

 

Ever notice that pretty much everyone else in the story is white and each for a variety of reasons represents the hurt caused to blacks by their unquestioned assumptions that slavery is perfectly acceptable? 

 

Ever notice that Mark Twain creates an episodic tale that includes the obvious evil behaviors of those who would in one way or another profit from slavery?

 

Ever notice that even the characters who are considered "good people" within their society do not question their acceptance of the preachers and judges who use the Bible and the law to justify slavery?

 

Ever notice that Huck is the only white person in the story who becomes uncomfortable with the way Jim is treated?

 

Ever wonder why the book ends with Huck recognizing that he "can't go back" to the brand of "black lives don't matter" civilization that he knows Aunt Sally will attempt to impose on him?

 

Ever notice that Mark Twain was a southern writer who wrote a story about the vices and follies of the slave holding south? 

 

Ever notice that everything Mark Twain wrote after Huck Finn was calling into question the wisdom and virtue of the wide variety of behaviors that were common among those who assume without doubt that they have privilege beyond those they assume do not?

 

Ever notice that The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn could not have  been written as an anti-slavery novel. It wasn't published until nearly a quarter of a century after the Emancipation Proclamation was signed. 

 

___________

 

I believe Mark Twain's intentions were sharply focused upon the vices and follies NOT addressed by the Emancipation Proclamation. That residual ugliness descended from 200 years of treating blacks as though their lives did not "really" matter even a quarter of a century after the end of slavery. And, any student who pays any attention today to how we still live in a world, both beyond and within, our borders where there is much work to be done in addressing the 21st century parallels to the vices and follies Mark Twain "put in our faces" will know that The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn may never have been more relevant than it is today.  

 

Black, Muslim, LGBT lives matter every bit as much as all lives. And, any one treating ANY group, muslim, LGBT, police, gun owners, liberals, and conservatives included, as though the bad represent the whole, is part of a very serious and inadequately attended to problem. 

 

Could it be possible that Twain was using the N-word to intentionally disturb those readers who either see themselves as treating blacks in ways very similar to the despicable characters in his story AND/OR to disturb those readers who who are fed up with being victimized.

 

Finally, a request to those who do teach The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn.

 

Please do not make excuses for Mark Twain's use of the N-word by "explaining" that we can't blame Twain since this was a commonly used word when Twain was writing. It was not the commonly used word by the "wise and/or virtuous." 

 

Maybe, just maybe, Twain's whole point was to  intentionally disturb the ignorant and/or evil who continued, nearly a quarter of a century after the Emancipation Proclamation was signed. to use the despicable word and to behave in the despicable ways as those who Twain criticizes had done. 

 

There's still work to be done. What 21st century Informational Reading might be a perfect match for proving that there is still work to be done.


 ~ www.GoogleLitTrips.org  ~

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