Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading
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MARK TWAIN: An educational journey

MARK TWAIN: An educational journey | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:

 How serendipitous looking for scoopable ariticles has become.

 

I spent some time exploring the zen pencils site this morning. Start looking through the free posters and other treasures to be found on the site and you'll find much of interest to the literary reading teacher.

 

I picked this one page as an example because it focuses upon the Mark Twain quote that I've had at the top of the Google Lit Trips homepage for quite some time.

 

_______________

 

"Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness."

_______________

 

How many great works of literature focus upon the impact of journeying beyond one's home?

 

Siddhartha? Of course

 

The Odyssey? Of course

 

The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn? Of course

 

To Kill A Mockingbird? Haven't you always noted that the difference between Atticus and his sister Alexandra can be explained because Atticus went away to study while Alexandra never left the landing?

 

Every single title in the Google Lit Trips library? That's the point of the Hero's Journey isn't it.

 

 ~ http://www.GoogleLitTrips.com ~

"Google Lit Trips" is the official fictitious business name of GLT Global ED, an educational nonprofit

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Sunflower Foundation's curator insight, August 31, 2013 6:58 PM

A great free resource for teachers, but also an inspiration. Teachers could ask students to collect similar inspirational quotes from their own cultural history, oral and written, and then make posters to decorate the classroom or to take home on rotation basis on loan.

Cindy Riley Klages's comment, September 2, 2013 9:46 AM
Select "free posters" on the top tab to see what's available when you sign up.
Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading
An Educator's Reading List of Contemporary Literature, Literacy, and Reading Issues. Visit us at http://www.GoogleLitTrips.org
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The pursuit of ignorance

The pursuit of ignorance | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
What does real scientific work look like? As neuroscientist Stuart Firestein jokes: It looks a lot less like the scientific method and a lot more like "farting around ... in the dark." In this witty talk, Firestein gets to the heart of science as it is really practiced and suggests that we should value what we don't know -- or "high-quality ignorance" -- just as much as what we know.
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:
20 August 2016

I was first captivated by the title of this TED Talk. And, actually prematurely put off by early comments that "seemed" to be calling into question the scientific method. 

Perhaps it's because we live in times and thanks (sincerely) to the likes of Donald Trump, we've been made painfully aware of the number of "anti-factual" folks out there who unabashedly "pee in the pool" of actual knowing. 

But, by the end of the talk,  I had been made aware of how much my openness to even the scent, though mistakenly identified in this case, had been polluted by the onslaught of the ravings of the adamantly ignorant drowning out the voices of more mature political discourse. 

The primary focus within this talk actually centered on the very interesting and positive role that ignorance plays in the advancement of science. There were several quotes from famous people of the past justifying the speaker's thesis that it is important to pay attention to the role of "thoroughly conscious ignorance."

Among my favorite quotes was actually a quote from the speaker himself, "Dead people should not be excluded from the conversation."  

And then near the end, the speaker surprisingly turned to educational testing where he suggests that learning the questions raised by learning the facts is as important, perhaps even more important, than learning the answers alone.

"High quality Ignorance." What an intriguing concept. This phrase fits cleanly with my recent interest in the term relating to measuring one's  "Curiosity Quotient."

Lower quality ignorance is dangerous because all too often it pre-empts doubt, even though our failure to question what we believe we know is the source of so many social evils.

brought to you by GLT Global ED / Google Lit Trips an educational nonprofit
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Google Lit Trips - Combining Literature and Geography

Google Lit Trips - Combining Literature and Geography | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
Imagine bringing the locations of stories to life for your students. With the help of Google Lit Trips, you can! This free resource gets kids excited!
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:
11 August 2016

Always a treat and an honor to wake up and find a kind mention of the Google Lit Trips project among my Google Alerts.

brought to you by GLT Global ED / Google Lit Trips an educational nonprofit
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Every Book Referenced On Season 4 Of "Orange Is The New Black"

Every Book Referenced On Season 4 Of "Orange Is The New Black" | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
Orange Is the New Black book club, anyone?..
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:
18 July 2016

I count myself as a fan of Orange is the New Black. Like many important issues it brought to our attention some of the most difficult issues not only within our prison systems, but also in the world at large.

Yes there were many very rough to face scenes. But Not turning away from that which we are uncomfortable being encouraged to consider is sometimes what it takes to face the truth that there is still much work to be done.

So, having noticed that many of the characters spent time reading, but the titles of their books flashed by too quickly to catch, I was happy to see that a complete list was provided for each episode of Season 4.

Haven't read many, but several were close to my heart including but not limited to Rainer Maria Rilke's Letter to a Young Poet, Ian Flemming's Casino Royale and Goldfinger (remembering fondly the master high school teacher who said I could read Ian Flemming for a personal reading projects as long as I read them all! My first author study and it was an eye opening experience), Chimamanda Ngozi's Americana;  L. Frank Baum's (the real) The Wizard of Oz, and of course Harper Lee's To Kill A Mockingbird. 

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Want More Dates? Survey Says You Should Read More Books

Want More Dates? Survey Says You Should Read More Books | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
#Truth.
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:
21 June 2016

Yep! And there's even an App for that!

What are you doing for your first day's lesson in your literature class?

I might well be starting with this INFORMATIONAL READING article. 

My favorite line? 

"The findings aren’t all that surprising, considering a 2014 Pew Research study that showed millennials — the generation most likely to be using dating apps — are actually more likely to have read a book in the past year than folks from other generations. While the narrative may be that books need saving, it would seem that the pastime is alive as ever."


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Every piece of art you've ever wanted to see -- up close and searchable

Every piece of art you've ever wanted to see -- up close and searchable | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
What does a cultural Big Bang look like? For Amit Sood, director of Google's Cultural Institute and Art Project, it's an online platform where anyone can explore the world's greatest collections of art and artifacts in vivid, lifelike detail. Join Sood and Google artist in residence Cyril Diagne in a mind-bending demo of experiments from the Cultural Institute and glimpse the exciting future of accessibility to arts and culture.
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:
7 June 2016

What happens when TED Talks meets the Google Cultural Institute?

I break with my fairly narrow focus upon "all things literary" to share perhaps the absolute greatest contribution to supporting and sharing global culture EVER!!

If you haven't yet discovered the Google Cultural Institute sit back for this 15 minute overview of EVERYTHING cultural organized in incredible ways.

Enjoy and share.

brought to you by GLT Global ED dba Google Lit Trips an educational nonprofit.
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The Library of Congress Is Uploading 75 Years of Poetry and Literature Recordings

The Library of Congress Is Uploading 75 Years of Poetry and Literature Recordings | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
Yesterday selections from the Archive of Recorded Poetry and Literature at the Library of Congress became available to stream online for the first time — the launch of a project digitizing some of their 2,000 recordings from the past 75 years of literature. “I think that reading
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:
24 May 2016

EUREKA!

Perhaps my favorite quote from this article says it all, 
__________

“I think that reading poetry and prose on the page is important, but there’s nothing that can replace listening to literature read aloud, especially when it is read by the creator of the work,”
 ~ Catalina Gomez, project manager
__________

I've always sat on the fence about what constitutes an "original source" when speaking of plays, lyrics, and even poetry.

With plays and songs we often are at the mercy of having to experience the text rather than the performance.  In these instances, I think it is easy to justify considering text as a secondary source. Text is not the intended experience of the original piece. It's almost like suggesting that the musical score rather than the music itself is the original source even though the performance rather than the notes that constitute the instruction for delivering the performance is the intended means of communicating the work to its intended audience.

I recently had the opportunity to experience a live performance by Billy Collins and Amy Mann. It was more than the sum of Billy Collins' words and Amy Mann's lyrics. It was choreography. It was interplay. It was an audio visual close encounter with the poet and artist. 

It just doesn't seem like a huge step to include the experience of poetry in the same way. Poetry is melodic. To hear poetry read by the poet; to hear the poet's interpretation of the melody exceeds even the best we can do in reading something we did not write and did not feel as it was created is a "lesser experience." It is, at best, a simulation of the original experience..

To hear the breath of the poet is to experience the heartbeat of the poem.

And thanks to the Library of Congress, we can now get closer to the original poetry than ever before.


brought to you by GLT Global ED dba Google Lit Trips, an educational nonprofit


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A plane passenger asked a teacher a kind of rude question about her job. She responded eloquently!

A plane passenger asked a teacher a kind of rude question about her job. She responded eloquently! | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
"So what do you do, darlin'?"
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:
24 May 2016

Just in case you're looking for a hero today! Yes, she mentions reading in this short inspiring video. But, wait until you hear what else she manages to mention about what you do.

How would this fly as your back to school presentation in September? 

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Lights, Cameras, Teach! Movie Making as a Lesson Planning Strategy

Lights, Cameras, Teach! Movie Making as a Lesson Planning Strategy | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
Check out these seven ideas for bringing the creative juices of movie making into your teaching practice.
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:
11 May 2016

Those of us who love stories, whether they are presented to us on stages, on pages, screens whether in theaters or on mobile devices, in whatever medium, will recognize the value add that this article can bring to the way we design the student interface with great literature.

It's not merely "having fun" on the assumption that having fun, in and of itself, engages while enhancing attention to the actual relevance of a story's themes. It's more of a precision design of the learning activities. 

Those who tell stories via movies have refined and deep levels their efforts to fully engage us. They embed us into their storytelling.

I couldn't help but think that suggestions 3, 4, 5, and 6 in particular, spoke to elements that are at the core of the design of Google Lit Trips.


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400 Times William Shakespeare Totally Blew Our Minds

400 Times William Shakespeare Totally Blew Our Minds | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
The Bard's been dead 400 years, and he's still killing it.
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:
28 April 2016

I'll let the Bard speak for himself and limit my commentary to:
1. He spoke for all of us

2. He touched on a few subjects you might want to preview before sharing with students

3. Best book on Shakespeare in my mind is Bill Bryson's Shakespeare: The World as Stage an intriguing collection of stories about what we know and don't really know about Shakespeare.

And (I'm so excited) Bill Bryson was recently announced as being one of next year's speakers at the Oakland Speakers Series. Whoo hoo!

Another semi-off the subject bit of Shakespeariana.
Here in California earthquake country, the local Shakespeare outdoor Shakespeare theatre is lovingly referred to as 
Cal Shakes! (and it does!)

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LeeMitchell's curator insight, April 29, 6:10 PM
Why is this news?  Because it's Shakespeare!
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The nit-picking glory of The New Yorker's Comma Queen

The nit-picking glory of The New Yorker's Comma Queen | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
"Copy editing for The New Yorker is like playing shortstop for a Major League Baseball team -- every little movement gets picked over by the critics," says Mary Norris, who has played the position for more than thirty years. In that time, she's gotten a reputation for sternness and for being a "comma maniac," but this is unfounded, she says. Above all, her work is aimed at one thing: making authors look good. Explore The New Yorker's distinctive style with the person who knows it best in this charming talk.
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:
16 April 2016

I found this Ted Talk by a copy editor for the New Yorker fascinating on a number of accounts. 

1. She does not take herself too seriously (whew!)
2. She takes her job incredibly seriously (love that too!)
3. She makes it clear that even the best writers may not be experts at grammar and/or usage.
4. There is room for differences of opinions regarding best grammar and/or usage

And, all of this from a copy editor for the New Yorker; certainly a publication with impressive "creds!"

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Why Emotions Have a Place in English Class

Why Emotions Have a Place in English Class | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
Grappling with the way books make students feel—not just analytical skills—should be part of the high-school English curriculum.
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:
13 April 2016
Up Front: I found this article quite refreshing in it's handling of teaching literature and ELA Common Core, as it addresses both some of the important concerns I have about the focus of the ELA Common Core Standards as well as one of my favorite aspects of the ELA Common Core Standards. 

 happen to like the treating of both Literary Reading and Informational Reading as different, but essential reading skill sets. And, if handled skillfully, each skill set can bring an important "value add" to the other; this being one of the core elements of the Google Lit Trips project vision. 

 Fiction set in the real world by definition seamlessly blends the value of literary reading's appeal to both the head and heart with the real world value of cross-curricular real world informational reading. 

I finished reading this article feeling justified in my reservations about the Common Core's misdirection of the value of Literary Reading, as well as justified in my appreciation for the benefits to be had by the skillful blending of the very different skills sets of both literary and informational reading into an enlightenment and understanding that reaches above and beyond that of either skill set alone. It's not a tug of war, but a cooperative pairing if done well .

 brought to you by GLT Global ED dba Google Lit Trips, an educational nonprofit.
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GoogleLitTrips Reading List's curator insight, April 13, 4:04 PM
13 April 2016

Up Front: I found this article quite refreshing in it's handling of teaching literature and ELA Common Core, as it addresses both some of the important concerns I have about the focus of the ELA Common Core Standards as well as one of my favorite aspects of the ELA Common Core Standards.

 I happen to like the treating of both Literary Reading and Informational Reading as different, but essential reading skill sets. And, if handled skillfully, each skill set can bring an important "value add" to the other; this being one of the core elements of the Google Lit Trips project vision. 

Fiction set in the real world by definition seamlessly blends the value of literary reading's appeal to both the head and heart with the real world value of cross-curricular real world informational reading. I finished reading this article feeling justified in my reservations about the Common Core's misdirection of the value of Literary Reading, as well as justified in my appreciation for the benefits to be had by skillful blending the very different skills sets of both literary and informational reading into an enlightenment and understanding that reaches above and beyond that of either skill set alone. 

It's not a tug of war, but a cooperative pairing if done well


brought to you by GLT Global ED dba Google Lit Trips, an educational nonprofit.
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New Google Lit Trip Published!

New Google Lit Trip Published! | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
Google Lit Trips, educational nonprofit, award winning, educational technology, place based storytelling, reading about reading
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:
11 April 2016

Announcing the publication of a brand new Google Lit Trip for The Lamp, the Ice, and the Boat Called Fish by Jaqueline Briggs Martin. 

Set in the Arctic Circle, this book is based on a true story of the last Voyage of the Karluk, Aleutian for "fish." The Karluk and its crew were joined by an Iñupiaq family and their two young daughters. Through the Iñupaiq family we learn much about the culture of the Inuit people. But, along the way, the Karluk runs into serious trouble and we find ourselves learning about an important event in history as we hope for the survival of the crew and its passengers. In this Google Lit Trip we have blended media and information about Iñupiaq culture and the actual historical events of the story.

You might want to bring a Parka along on this Lit Trip!

Also in celebration of National Poetry month we're pointing visitors towards a very interesting student developed Lit Trip feature 15 of her favorite poets. Locations represent the poets' birthplaces. Includes audio links to the student reading a favorite poem by each poet.

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Empathy Doesn't Make You a Good Person

Empathy Doesn't Make You a Good Person | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
From a moral standpoint, it makes the world worse.
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:
8 April 2016

Oh my! One of the most powerful defenses for the value of literary reading has always been its ability to promote the development of empathy. 

And then, while searching for something worthy of scooping, I came across the title of this short video. "Empathy Doesn't Make You a Good Person," and published in The Atlantic, one of my "Go To" sources for thought provoking pieces? 

How could this be?

My first thought was a recollection of one of my personal guide post quotes when confronting what appears to seriously contradict one of my most strongly held beliefs.
_____
"It's a rare person who wants to hear what he doesn't want to hear." ~ Dick Cavett
_____

Could there be an "aha" moment; an "I never thought about it that way before" realization to be discovered in the video?

By the way, this concept that I could be wrong or at least responsible for modifying an existing belief was at the heart of my favorite requirement for a well developed argumentative essay; the required concession paragraph. 

So, I watched the video.

My attention was caught in the argument that empathy has a serious downside if it is actually deeply felt and then quickly abandoned once the passion subsides. I realized I could not argue with some of the evidence provided. 

I'll leave you to weigh the evidence provided in defense of the thesis that empathy can blind us by distorting our perception of what is important, what altruistic actions really make a difference, and the penetrating question of the shortfall of what is referred to as the reward of "warm glow altruism," which I had to consider might be more self-serving (self-delusional) than helpful in addressing issues for which we feel an intense, but often fleeting empathetic rush.

OKAY, I had to admit that there are issues associated with empathy's value IN SOME CASES. We've seen the student suddenly sensing the college application pressure to have some,community service to pad one's application.  Yet that community service pressure for some often is minimal or "fly-by" and motivated more by self-serving purposes than by actual empathy for others.

We've seen catastrophe generate intense but short-lived interest in the well-being of those existing in impoverished conditions or in the conditions behind our increasingly NOT rare encounters with gun violence, or even in the actual importance of honesty in public discourse as we "ready our opinions" for pending elections? 

How though could I still find myself concluding that the video's conclusions do not fairly address the value of empathy? 

I came to think of the argument as being similar to a frequent discussion of optimism in many, many class discussions in my satire class. 

As there is a difference between fleeting empathy and deeper ongoing empathetic efforts to "really" make a difference, there is a similar difference between what I referred to as "Panglossian optimism" and what I referred to "Martin Luther King optimism."

Pangloss from Voltaire's Candide, represents a rose-colored lens-type optimism believing that everything is for the best. This led Pangloss to defend what "appears" to be bad by providing extremely ludicrous explanations of why the bad is actually good and therefore requires nothing of us. 

Martin Luther King on the other hand stared what is bad directly in the eye and worked incessantly to make what is bad better. His optimism was essentially, "Yes there is bad, therefore I believe something can and must be done." 

The connection I see? Let us admit that a Panglossian-like low level of empathy can lead to a certain self-delusion and bias that might actually cause a distraction away from recognizing that more must be done than "fly-by" acts of kindness.

And, let us also remember that developing empathy at deeper and more realistic levels, requires us to accept a responsibility to make the cultivation of of empathy a serious Martin Luther King-like driving force within our moral compasses.

And, life-long literary reading, just might be the force that continually reminds us to care in ways that make a real difference.

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August 2016: Pokémon Go in the classroom

August 2016: Pokémon Go in the classroom | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
"...have [students] create a “Google Pokemon Go Trip”. Students ... can share their journeys with others. To learn how to start this process, instructions for the Google Lit Trips project will help you out!"
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:
17 August 2016

One of the many great honors / pleasures of my experience with Google Lit Trips has been to extent to which the Google Lit Trips project has inspired other real world learning experiences. RealWorldMath.org being among the many. 

Today I was pretty amused to find that the Google Lit Trips concept is being suggested as a model for converting Pokémon Go into a real world learning experience. 

I have to admit that my experience with Pokémon Go is little more than noticing that it is a world-wide craze that has been the butt of a lot of lemming jokes. 

Yet, discovering this Discovery Education article reminded me of my life-long attraction to the joys and discoveries resulting from divergent thinking when it comes to lesson planning.

So... I am hoping that anyone picking up on the suggestion of trying to blend Pokémon Go with the Google Lit Trips concept will consider sharing the experience and outcomes with me at: Jerome@GoogleLitTrips.org.

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Why Actors With Disabilities Need To Be Part Of The Diversity Discussion

Why Actors With Disabilities Need To Be Part Of The Diversity Discussion | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
Actor Danny Woodburn ("Seinfeld," Watchmen") says it's time to break the stigma through storytelling.
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:
30 July 2016

A very interesting talk about how storytelling can bring much better understanding of people with disabilities to the "able-bodied."  

I continue to believe that storytelling brings a realness to its audience that fleshes out the humanity of its audience in ways that informational reading alone generally can not. 

Perhaps it is because storytelling brings both our minds and our hearts closer to "being with" the people who inhabit the stories. Whereas by design and with good reason, informational reading tends to intentionally maintain an emotional distance.

Both provide access to deeper understandings of that for which our existing understanding has less depth. I do not argue one over the other. The question here however, is which is more effective at capturing our interest, activating our caring, and motivating us to act?

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It’s Finally Time To Stop Correcting People’s Grammar, Linguist Says

It’s Finally Time To Stop Correcting People’s Grammar, Linguist Says | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
"Language -- which all human societies have in immense grammatical complexity -- is far more interesting than pedantry."
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:
2 July 2016

Wondering to what extent this article will be applauded or roundly abhorred by the professional ELA community. 

Try this quote from the article  while wearing a blood pressure cuff...

_____
(referring to author Oliver Kamm) 

"A recovering pedant himself, he now speaks for the boldest form of descriptivism, arguing that if humans use a word outside of its traditional meaning, the new, creative use is now valid, simply by virtue of having been used at all. So, “literally” can mean “figuratively,” and “irregardless” can mean “regardless.” Adverbs — probably the mostly hotly debated part of speech — are welcome in Kamm’s world, as are split infinitives and sentences that start with “and.”
____

Is your reaction to the previous quote influenced at all by this quote, also from author Oliver Kamm...

_____
"... I think language tuition is better focused on the need to express yourself to the right audience. Linguists refer to “register” — the different styles and ranges of formality we adopt for particular audiences. That’s not all there is to effective writing and speaking but it’s not stressed enough in usage guides."
_____

The essential understanding that one's audience ought to strongly influence the level of the "properness" of one's speech and writing does seem to be fading at a disturbing rate.

Yet, simultaneously, for example, the demonization of the term "political correctness;" too often code for old fashioned sexism, racism, xenophobia, and so many other forms of adamant ignorance all too common even at  the highest levels of public discourse has become seriously worrisome.


 ~ GoogleLitTrips.org ~
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Google Lit Trips: Books Come Alive | Sweet Integrations

Google Lit Trips: Books Come Alive | Sweet Integrations | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
Make your books come alive with Google Lit Trips. Your students will love visiting all the locations mentioned in your book.
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:
17 June 2016

I am so happy to have decided to spend my retirement after nearly 40 years teaching, by supporting educators, teachers, and students from around the world.

Articles such as this truly warm my heart.

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11 Exercises That'll Make Book Lovers Excited To Work Out

11 Exercises That'll Make Book Lovers Excited To Work Out | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it

"Note: The following exercises were created for satirical purposes. But if you try these at home and get more fitness and reading in, email the authors so they can feel good about their lives."

GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:
29 May 2016

Did you burn more calories than pages you read today?

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Writers On Trump

The following Open Letter is a statement signed by more than 450 U.S. writers, regarding the candidacy of Donald J. Trump for the Presidency of the United States. 

GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:
24 May 2016

What are you doing for your Informational Reading learning experience today?

When I saw a link to this petition on Huff Post today (http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/writers-sign-petition-against-trump_us_574480e8e4b0613b512b562d) I wanted to see how many of the "450 writers" I recognized. I did recognize a few, including one writer who actually collaborated on the development of a Google Lit Trips on a book she had co-written. 

I also was surprised that the "450" had grown to over 900 and well over 1,000 since I began writing this comment.

Regarding Informational Reading... 
A question came to mind as to whether the reading of the open letter signed by so many writers would be fair game as an "Informational Reading" learning experience? 

The question is complicated since this is actually a petition signed by writers that clearly expresses opposition to Trump's presidential bid.

Is it biased or informational?

Where exactly is the line betwixt biased and unbiased expression?

Is it opinion or propaganda?

Is it honest or cherry-picking?

Whatever the answers might be to these questions, what are the chances that one might have to face some serious community backlash should you use this Open Letter as an exercise in Informational Reading?

If one did want to attempt to preempt accusations of bias by presenting a counterpoint piece, what arguments might be offered that also might or might not also raised the very questions I've raised about this petition?



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New Google Lit Trip! Until the Last Spike, Journal of Sean Sullivan...

New Google Lit Trip! Until the Last Spike, Journal of Sean Sullivan... | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
Google Lit Trips, educational nonprofit, award winning, educational technology, place based storytelling, reading about reading
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:
17 May 2016

Announcing the publication of a brand new Google Lit Trip for Until the Last Spike, the Journal of Sean Sullivan, a Transcontinental Railroad Worker, Nebraska and Points West, 1867 by William Durbin. 

 "Until the Last Spike, The Journal of Sean Sullivan, is about a fictional character named Sean Sullivan and his journey working on the Transcontinental Railroad. It's August 1867 and Sean has just arrived from Chicago, planning to work with his father on the Transcontinental Railroad... Sean discovers the rough and rowdy world of the towns that seem to sprout up from nowhere along the railroad's path over the prairie...Through Sean's eyes, the history of this era and the magnitude of his and his fellow workers' achievements come alive." – Goodreads


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Wonderfully Weird & Ingenious Medieval Books

Wonderfully Weird & Ingenious Medieval Books | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
Leiden University book historian Erik Kwakkel describes his tumblr site as follows: 'I post images from medieval books.' In the words of Samuel L. Jackson on the immortal Snakes on a Plane, you either want to see that, or you don't.
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:
2 May 2016

Wow Again! Another scoop that is just too cool. Great examples of very unusual books. Be sure to click the links within the site to see a wide variety of other very cool books, most from medieval times.

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Lego Marks Anniversary Of Shakespeare's Death In Typically Awesome Way

Lego Marks Anniversary Of Shakespeare's Death In Typically Awesome Way | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
The Danish company used stop motion animation to recreate the Bard's most iconic scenes.
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:
22 April 2016

This is pretty darned cool! Gotta watch the video and then watch it again, and again, and, well as cool as it is you've probably got chores to get to sometime today.

Happy B-Day to "Shaka-spee-air-ray." 

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Go ahead, make up new words!

Go ahead, make up new words! | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
In this fun, short talk from TEDYouth, lexicographer Erin McKean encourages — nay, cheerleads — her audience to create new words when the existing ones won’t quite do. She lists out 6 ways to make new words in English, from compounding to “verbing,” in order to make language better at expressing what we mean, and to create more ways for us to understand one another.
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:
16 April 2016

A charming, sometimes hilarious, and thought provoking short talk about the way new words develop. Interesting breakdown of different categories of ways new words are created.

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Shakespeare First Folio discovered on Scottish island - BBC News

Shakespeare First Folio discovered on Scottish island - BBC News | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
Oxford University academics discover a first collected edition of Shakespeare's plays in a Scottish stately home.
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:
12 April 2016

All I can say is "I'll be darned." As an English major this is of MAJOR interest.

To students not inclined to become English majors, perhaps the interest, if any is modest.

But to those of us who care as deeply as we do it is "blow your mind" exciting that such discoveries are still to be hoped for.

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GoogleLitTrips Reading List's curator insight, April 12, 10:09 PM
12 April 2016

All I can say is "I'll be darned." As an English major this is of MAJOR interest.

To students not inclined to become English majors, perhaps the interest, if any is modest.

But to those of us who care as deeply as we do it is "blow your mind" exciting that such discoveries are still to be hoped for.


brought to you by GLT Global ED dba Google Lit Trips, an educational nonprofit
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Google GTI - California 2016

Google GTI - California 2016 | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
Information on the Google Geo Teachers Institute to be hosted at the Google Campus, Mountain View, CA.
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:
8 April 2016
Fans of Google Lit Trips and / or any educational integration of Google Mapping Tools might want to consider applying for the 2016 Google Geo Teachers Institute to be held July 25-26, 2016 at the Google Campus in Mountain View, CA. 

The two-day institute is free though space is limited. So, if it is of interest consider applying ASAP. The Institute is free* to anyone. However, space is limited so get your applications in quickly. 

Deadline: All applications submitted by 30th April will receive equal consideration. Applications after that date will be processed if spaces remain available.
 
 Google Lit Trips Founder Jerome Burg along with an All-Star team of Google Mapping experts will present a full two-day institute of sessions focusing upon educational integrations of all Google mapping tools. 

 If you're a Google Lit Trip fan, let me know if you get accepted. (Jerome@GoogleLitTrips.org) I'm always excited to meet fans in person. 

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