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9 Books That Make You Undateable

9 Books That Make You Undateable | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
There's a lot of red tape to cut through before completely committing to a relationship: There's the ex talk, the meeting of the parents, and if you're a literature nerd there's the unavoidable conversation about your respective favorite books.

 

 

__________

Bibliophiles will get a kick out of this.

 

Haven't been single in "several" decades, but there's something intriguing about this article. On the surface, it appears to be rather light in intent, but there's much to think about at the same time. 

 

There is some truth in it's premise that our literary lives might truly play an interesting role in our search for that Mr. or Ms Right.

 

Can't help but wonder what titles would be included in an article that lists books that make you truly dateable or worthy of serious consideration as that Mr. or Ms Right someone is looking for.

 

Also wondering what variations of this concept might be engaging for not only pre- and neo-bibliophiles but also for reluctant readers.

 

Anything to encourage pausing and thinking about what makes reading a go-to activity in this "anything goes" world of ours.

 

 ~ http://www.GoogleLitTrips.com ~

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Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading
An Educator's Reading List of Contemporary Literature, Literacy, and Reading Issues. Visit us at http://www.GoogleLitTrips.org
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The Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini UPDATED

The Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini UPDATED | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it

From Google Lit Trips...

The Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini added to list of refreshed Lit Trips in preparation for the launch of our updated website.

GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:

21 October 2014

 

The Kite Runner v6 just published. Lots of media and weblink updates!

 

Google Lit Trips fans using any of the following Lit Trip titles can upgrade now. All previous versions will become obsolete once the new Google Lit Trips website is launched sometime in the next few months.

 

The Kite Runner v6 by Khaled Hosseini

The Grapes of Wrath v7 by John Steinbeck

Flotsam v3 by David Wiesner

Sam Patch Daredevil Jumper v4 by Julie Cummins

Going Home v3 by Margaret Wild

A Walk in London v4 by Salvatore Rubbino

A Family Apart v5 by Joan Lowery Nixon

Abuela v3 by Arthur Dorros

Big Anthony: His Story v4 by Tomie DePaola

Make Way for Ducklings v4 by Robert McCloskey

Number the Stars v4 by Lois Lowry

By the Great Hornspoon v4 by Sid Fleishman

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Big Changes Coming to Google Lit Trips!

Big Changes Coming to Google Lit Trips! | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it

Very Important Information for ALL Google Lit Trips Users!

GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:

20 September 2014

 The good news that I can share is that a completely redesigned and updated website is under development. The anticipated transition date is still undetermined.

 

In preparation for the transition to the new site, we will be revising ALL existing Google Lit Trips over the next several weeks to reflect changes we are making in our media storage location. We will be posting those revisions on the existing site as they are completed so that those using these titles can update to the new versions as soon as they are available.

 

It is IMPORTANT to know that the media in previous versions of existing Google Lit Trips may cease to work properly once the new site is published.

 

You can check the existing website to see an updated list of the new versions as they are published.

 

 ~ www.GoogleLitTrips.org ~

GLT Global ED aka Google Lit Trips, an educational nonprofit

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GoogleLitTrips Reading List's curator insight, September 20, 5:03 PM

20 September 2014

 The good news that I can share is that a completely redesigned and updated website is under development. The anticipated transition date is still undetermined.

 

In preparation for the transition to the new site, we will be revising ALL existing Google Lit Trips over the next several weeks to reflect changes we are making in our media storage location. We will be posting those revisions on the existing site as they are completed so that those using these titles can update to the new versions as soon as they are available.

 

It is IMPORTANT to know that the media in previous versions of existing Google Lit Trips may cease to work properly once the new site is published.

 

You can check the existing website to see an updated list of the new versions as they are published.

 

 ~ www.GoogleLitTrips.org ~

GLT Global ED aka Google Lit Trips, an educational nonprofit

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Why Are Fairy Tales Universally Appealing?

Stories are like that. Like cities, they are built on the stones and bones of the past....
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:

20 September 2014

 

______

NOTE: IF YOU FIND THIS ARTICLE INTERESTING, SEE OUR OTHER SCOOP-IT ENTRY FOR TODAY,  "WHY A GOOD BOOK IS A SECRET DOOR."

_____

 The comments I wrote for our other scoop today are absolutely appropriate for this article as well. In a sense, both offer eloquent defenses for literary reading, for fiction being the art of using "lies" to reveal "truth."  

 

Rather than repeat comments made in our previous scoop, here are a few thought-provoking quotes from Kate Forsyth's piece focusing upon how and WHY fiction has a long history of updating and retelling age old stories.

 

_____" old stories made new can utterly change what we knew and understood about that story... and perhaps about ourselves as well."____

 

The ellipsis in the quote is the authors. And, it provides a poignant pause before delivering the real reason why we read the classics. The characters in all great stories represent ourselves. We read them to find ourselves, to learn more about ourselves and the nature of the world within which we exist. 

 

After a quick, poetically licensed review of the ancestry  of the Sleeping Beauty story, many of our students only know through Disney. she suggests that...

 

_____"Stories are like that. Like cities, they are built on the stones and bones of the past."

_____
Quite simply, like the umbilical cord, we are all connected to the previous generation who themselves are all connected to the generations that preceded them. And, it is that "string of connections" that is at the source of the potential for seeing our world more clearly by reading about the world(s), fictitious or otherwise, of those who told those variations of the same stories from the beginning of time.


Forsyth continues...

_____

"One of the things I was examining in my doctorate is why fairy tales such as "Sleeping Beauty" and "Rapunzel" continue to be told and retold, sometimes enduring for over a thousand years. Basically, what I discovered is a story only survives if it articulates some kind of desire or dilemma, some kind of predicament, which is of importance to both the reteller of the tale, and to his or her audience."

_____


Successful storytellers can not just tell stories of interest to themselves. They must appeal to what their audiences find important. 


As educators, we have already discovered the relevance and and importance of great literature. But, we can only assist our students in making those same discoveries for themselves.

 

We rarely find students who accept relevance and importance because we tell them a story is relevant and important. And, truthfully, I worry about students who do accept our word as truth without coming to understand for themselves  the truths we share with them. Those may well be the same people who grow up to be targeted victims of any snake-oil charlatan who "tells them to believe without question." 


Discovering a story's relevance, is a joyous experience in finding oneself in the story's revelations.  

 

So on that note, I guess I should stop telling you what to find in this article. There is much to discover, contemplate, and consider integrating into our own particular pedagogical practices.

 

   ~ www.GoogleLitTrips.org ~brought to you by GLT Global ED aka Google Lit Trips, an educational nonprofit

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Books Tell You Why, Inc. - Google+

Books Tell You Why, Inc. - Google+ | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
Books Tell You Why, Inc. - Rare Books, First Editions, Signed Books and Gift Ideas - Rare Books, Signed Books, First Editions.  Open by appointment.  All inventory is available at BooksTellYouWhy.com.
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:

FLASH! 16 hours after posting this blog, amused by the reference to what I had read at "TUTOR" and thinking that the tear-offs were AUTHORS, I realized I had completely misread everything! At second glance I thought, "Oh wow! how did I miss the misspelling of "TUTOR?" It was the THIRD read when I realized the author meant TUTOR and those weren't authors!

 

 

19 September 2014

 

Says it all.

 

Found this on the g+ page for the 

www.BooksTellYouWhy.com  website; a website primarily dedicated to finding and selling rare books.

 

I really like the name of their website. Literary reading has value because great literature tells us WHY. 

 

 ~ www.GoogleLitTrips.com ~

brought to you by GLT Global ED aka Google Lit Trips, an educational nonprofit

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If Anyone Has Ever Said Anything Cruel To You On The Internet, Then This One Is For You

A video every troll on the internet will want to watch, simply to see who can hate on it the best.
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:

16 September 2014

 

Not easy to watch. But, if bullying is to be addressed, perhaps every teacher ought to take 5 minutes to watch this video and ask themselves, "Just when do children begin to bully and victimize their classmates?"

 

What are their motives? Where did they first begin to accept the forces that lead to bullying?

 

And, my question is, "At what age would it be appropriate to have students watch this video?

 

And, if we truly believe that informational reading is important, and of course it is, would we consider this video followed by reading the  information behind the "more bullying facts you should learn"  link, and then the information about the   OLWEUS Bullying Prevention Program >> link on that page?

I might even reverse that order, by having students read the two linked sources prior to watching this video.

 

And, I wouldn't try to lead the conversation. I'd have students read, then watch the video. And, then I'd say something to the effect of, "So, I don't know what you think about that experience, but I'd really like to know. So, I will be silent and listen for the next 15 minutes while you discuss the lesson."

 

My guess? Very awkward silence. And, within 4 minutes, someone would say something, that triggers a very deeply engaged and serious conversation.

 

The trick. If no one starts the conversation, the entire class would have nothing to do but marinate in awkward, no, make that introspective silence. 

 

It would be important that the teacher not speak, and not turn to paper correcting while waiting. 

 

Should by some miracle, the conversation not start. I would wait the entire 15 minutes and then say something like, "Perhaps none of us has the courage to speak first. So, this is what we'll do. Take out a piece of paper. DO NOT PUT YOUR NAME ON IT. Now jot down some notes on what you might have said had the discussion happened."

 

 

 ~ www.GoogleLitTrips.org ~

brought to you by GLT Global ED an educational nonprofit

 

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This Video of One of the Coolest English Teachers Ever Will Make You Smile

This Video of One of the Coolest English Teachers Ever Will Make You Smile | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
Greek epics have never been so relatable.
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:

7 September 2014

 

I like this video! Period.

 

However, in the comments, one person suggested that the teacher is engaged as the "sage on the stage" but questions whether or not the students are actually engaged themselves. 

 

This is an important concern. However, I think there is plenty of evidence that Mr. Schmo is a master salesman and he's selling relevance to a class that is enthusiastically seeing, discovering and then buying the relevance; and thereby becoming intellectually engaged at deep levels. My guess is that those very kids are probably given opportunities to engage and demonstrate that engagement by discovering for themselves that Mr. Schmo is a mentor well-worth listening to. Otherwise, why would so many students leave enthusiastic to pick up the love of reading and in many cases to pick up the torch of promoting a love for literature?

 

"Setting the stage" for student engagement to happen is more than the science of teaching. It is the art of teaching. Mr. Schmo is firing up his students in ways too many with technical skills alone do not accomplish. 

 

Yes, there are many accused of being "sages on the stages" who do all the thinking for their students while not selling any engagement other than being engaged in trying to guess what will be on "the test." That is the lowest level teaching from the front of the room. It is not the" be all' and "end all" of being a sage on the stage.

 

I am NOT building a case for one side of the "sage on the stage" conversation or the other. If anything, I'm suggesting that there is an upside to both sides of the question and therefore abandoning one side in favor of the other is simplistic and without both, much is lost.

 

So, here's one for your irony collection...

"Sage on the Stage" has always bothered me in terms of teaching literature. Why do I love Shakespeare? Because he was a sage that brought centuries of audiences to levels of receptivity to wisdom on the STAGE! 

 

Engagement with all great literature is essentially the act of being receptive to sage wisdom. All great literature is staged. 

 

A couple of quotes of note...

_____

"Good digressions are an example of bright minds making connections."

_____

 

Yes, Holden you were on to something that your digression-hating teacher was missing. What bridge was the student building when he or she "drifted" into the digression? What Vygotskian Zone of Proximal Development was he or she, delicately constructing? Perhaps taking this approach, a great teacher could artfully guide students to discovering important connections or perhaps refining important and as yet unfocused-connections.

 

I might also digress for a moment to suggest that a parallel opportunity exists when students use clichés when exploring a budding interest in poetry or creative writing. Clichés aren't evil; they're just not fresh. Young writers are fragile and frequently "out there on the edge of their comfort zones."

 

Some sage and encouraging support regarding the use of clichés rather than a condemnation for having used them helps build comfort with exploring the edges of one's comfort zone rather than increasing the discomfort associated with such admirable risk-taking by slamming the effort because they have a budding, but new interest in metaphors as a creative means of capturing one's thoughts via  the use imaginative imagery.

 

 

Here's another quote from Mr. Schmo that I really liked...

 

_____

"We don't study it (literature) because it's old. We study it because these stories are about you."

_____

 

Mr. Schmo is selling PERSONAL VALUE. He wasn't trying to create more English majors. Yet ironically or inevitably, because he was selling VALUE, he managed to also have created so much student engagement that he also motivated an incredible number of students to actually go on to become English majors and even published writers.

 

Who are the sages in your life? Who had a way of intriguing you into being receptive to ideas and challenges to your existing beliefs and values, that was nearly magical? 

 

In my case the sages who made a difference were a few incredibly talented teachers. Mr. Tinling in Geometry. Mr. Kay in English, Ansel Adams in photography, Writers like Howard Zinn, Musicians like Bob Dylan. Their talent was not in telling me what I should think and know, but in enticing me into to wondering about what I think and what I care about.

 

I'm all for preferring to be a "guide on the side." However, the typical classroom has four sides and each provides opportunities to fire up student engagement when creatively employed.

 

Sometimes it's good to listen to the sage wisdom of Plato's Allegory of the Cave. To consider the Oracle at Delphi, to 

 ~ www.GoogelLitTrips.org ~

brought to you by GLT Global ED, an educational nonprofit

 

 

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Luisa Cuesta's curator insight, September 20, 2:12 PM

Ojala todos aprendiéramos como enseñarle a los estudiantes a amar la lectura...un gran ejemplo de un maestro que AMA su profesión!

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6 Reasons Why Print Books Will Always Be Better

6 Reasons Why Print Books Will Always Be Better | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
Surprise, surprise. Literary writers prefer print....
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:

23 August 2014

 

One simple question. Would you consider using this article in class as an excellent example of "Informational Reading"?

 

I might, but not for the reasons you might expect.

 

__________

A PREFACE:  A clarification. It is not my intent to counter the pro-print and anti-E-book positions taken in this article. My intent is to call into question the tact taken by the article's writer (henceforth referencing the writer of the article in order to distinguish the article's author from the book authors referenced in the article).Had the author used the same tact, with the exception of presenting only evidence gleaned from pro-eBook writers, I would certainly have had as much to be concerned about  regarding its lack of balance.

__________

 

I might use this article as an exercise in determining when "informational reading represents an example of a writer being informed, misinformed, disinformed, or ill-informed.

 

My intent was to reference the writer of the article, however I suppose that it might also reference the authors who are the subject of the article as well.

 

My concerns...

 • The article's title is misleading. I had hoped that the writer might be writing an article representing a cross-section of authors who have preferences for reading traditional print or E-Books. 

 

__________

AN INTERESTING SIDEBAR: The previous comment refers to the title on the article as it was published on The Huffington Post (Click to the article above to see for yourself). When "scooped" for this blog, the title mysteriously changed to "6 Reasons why Print Books Will Always be Better." Having done my fair share of print production, I know that headlines are generally not the work of an article's author, but rather the product of the page layout person. The headline as published on The Huffington Post is misleading; the headline that appears at the top of this blog is at least more honest in that it does not hide the writer's bias.

__________

 

I've long had concerns about teachers who express to their students a preference (or skeptical opinion) of either format. Well intended as it may be, it is a personal opinion being passed off as an informed opinion. And, we live in a world where many, if not most, students from every ability level are still too often focused upon reflecting what they believe to be what the teacher wants them to believe, whether they do or not, is going to be on the test (or appreciated by the person who will eventually be handing out grades). Those who prefer "the other" media for their reading may well come to one of two conclusions; either perceiving themselves as in a minority of those "less respected" by the teacher or, in a class with a clueless teacher. This is disturbing in light of our goal of encouraging all students to value the wisdom articulated in great works of literature.

 

 • The writer then begins by clarifying the fact that the authors of whom she writes all share a particular grudge against Amazon, the major distributor of digital text. Their grudge, which may well be justified, is primarily based upon Amazon's policy of not making available books written by authors whose works are also sold by Amazon's primary competitor, Hachette. I suppose this is a reasonable concern since the  Amazon policy does punish the authors by reducing the distribution of their work. The authors become the rope being dragged through the mud in the tug-o-war between two corporations. So, unfair as it appears to be, the question is can authors be unbiased when asked about their preferences for reading media? I don't know. 

 

 • In spite of the headline's appearance of an implied promise to be fair and balanced, the writer clarifies in bold, but buried, text that her article will only represent authors who favor traditional print over digital media. 

 

Those authors articulate the traditional arguments in favor of traditional print, many of which are reasons that my own reading habits sometimes includes traditional print. I do love the ambiance that the wall of books in my den brings to the room. I do appreciate the feel of a book in my hands, the smell of an old book as I read an old classic. I like the "lendability" of printed books, (though I suppose that isn't a preference for many authors who would rather every reader by his or her own copy).

 

 • Another concern is that there is a common "jump to the conclusion" that authors have some special expertise on the subject. 

 

They may have some degree of expertise on quality of an author's writing. Though examples of famous author's distaste for other famous authors abound. (see: The 30 Harshest author on author insults in History: http://flavorwire.com/188138/the-30-harshest-author-on-author-insults-in-history)

 

It's pretty clear to anyone who happens to prefer E-Book reading that some of these authors are in fact ill -informed or inadequately experienced about reading E-Books. 

 

For example, like Lev Grossman, I too want to leave my kids a roomful of books, but reducing the act of reading E-books to "a chunk of plastic that they (the kids) have to guess the password to" would not pass muster in my class for representing an argument objectively. 

And, I don't even get the intent of his quoting Maurice Sendak's suggestion that there is a parallel between reading books and sex having only one kind PERIOD. Absurd. One of the most exciting trends in creating reading materials is the exploration being done by authors of many new concepts in packaging books.

 

Emma Straub, begins with her confession that she's never read an e-book. Well, I'd rather hear the opinions of authors who have invested time in learning a bit about the subject they have taken a very strong opinion about. I do agree with her that I don't find reading on my phone to be a preferable mode of reading. But, to suggest that reading on a phone is a counter argument of much value, in spite of the distinct differences between reading e-books on a phone and reading e-books on other devices. 

 

Anthony Doerr. If you feel that way, fine. Sometimes I have similar, but less intense preferences. However, having also spent a lot of time on my iPad I've come to understand that e-book modes of letting me know where I am in the book are pretty easy to get used to and have some distinct advantages. I would not have an opposing view if he'd indicated that he has issues with the difficulty of referencing pagination since unlike print books, pagination varies in e-books dependent upon font size options they have which brings both the consistent pagination problems but also the benefit of being able to adjust visual comfort. And, if his reference to making "scribbles of my passage" refers to the delightful activity of highlighting text and creating marginalia, Well, e-books beat the pants off of printed books, ah, IN MY OPINION.

 

And, his concern about the irritation he feels when getting "alerts blooming across the page announcing that it's your turn in Words With Friends," as clever as it seems at first indicates that he must not have phones that ring or an awareness of the preferences for controlling alerts  on digital devices. 

 

I must say that I was much less concerned about the comments of the last three authors included in this article.

Sue Monk Kidd presents her pro-print opinions without having to counterbalance them with questionably ill-informed opinions about e-book reading.

 

Elizabeth McCracken also restricts her comments to very specific reasons why she prefers print over e-Books in that dropping a paper book while reading in the bathtub is much less of a problem than dropping one's iPad while bathing. And, coffee spills and small children? Yes, these are arguments that with the exception of simply being careful, are understandable concerns.

 

Karen Russell prefers print over e-Books but makes the most sensible statement when she recognizes that "But writing an e-book has been an exciting experiment; it's the way so many people read now. [Print versus e-books] is sort of a funny rivalry."


The problem she mentions about feeling like a dinosaur for her preference is intriguing. I would hope that one's reading preferences would NOT make one feel like an outcast. Though, those of us with some concern about sustainability issues relating to the consumption of paper might feel a bit more concerned about the matter. 

 

But, with that exception, what is the advantage in a classroom of a teacher expressing his or her preference as though students with the "other preference" are outcasts and in an indefensible position?

 

Reading preferences are not like elections where one side wins if it can demonstrate a majority approval. The real "winners" are those who prefer reading regardless of preference for means of access.

 

 Our personal preferences in reading format are personal.

 

On the other hand, our professional preferences in reading format ought to be in promoting whatever means of accessing the great stories that each of our students find most engaging. This might simply be a recognition that individualizing our lesson design should consider THEIR reading access preferences not ours.

 

And, by the way, check out the graphic used to illustrate the article. A chalk board????? 

 

 ~ www.GoogleLitTrips.com ~

brought to you by GLT Global ED an educational nonprofit

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Sarah McElrath's curator insight, September 9, 4:22 PM

Interesting points by Google-lit-trips.

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WATCH: A Beautiful Robin Williams Tribute, In Williams' Own Voice

WATCH: A Beautiful Robin Williams Tribute, In Williams' Own Voice | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
This poem honoring the late Robin Williams is beautifully touching on its own. In the hands of Jim Meskimen, the author of the poem and a talented voice actor, it's a masterpiece.

"I've been thinking about Robin Williams all week long, and .....
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:

16 August 2014

 

It may not be what you might expect. But the headline is perfectly accurate. And any literary loving teacher of poetry really ought to consider sharing this ASAP. A lesson in poetry's deep power to reach both the mind and heart.

 

Your students are ready for this.

 

 ~ www.GoogleLitTrips.org ~

brought to you by GLT Global ED an educational nonprofit

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Google Lit Trips: Back to School Fundraiser

Google Lit Trips: Back to School Fundraiser | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:

11 August 2014

Two great ways to support the Google Lit Trips project.

1. Make a tax-deductible donation in any amount.

2. Use the Amazon Link on our home page to do your back to school shopping. 

 

It's that easy. 

 

And, thanks for what you do to support reading education around the globe!

 

Jerome Burg

founder & president

Google Lit Trips the flagship project of GLT Global ED a 501(c)(3) educational nonprofit

 

 ~ www.GoogleLitTrips.org ~

brought to you by GLTGlobalED a 501(c)(3) educational nonprofit

 

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6 virtual field trips to give lesson plans a boost

6 virtual field trips to give lesson plans a boost | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
Don't have the budget to travel the world? That doesn't mean students have to miss out! 
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:

28 July 2014

Always nice to get a shout out for Google Lit Trips in people's blogs!

 

What can I say when Google Lit Trips is suggested as a highly recommended site for "virtual field trips"?

 

Al I can say is I'm truly honored. Thanks to the good people at D Education DIVE

 

This one is particularly glowing in that it begins...

_____

"Definitely one of the most creative of the virtual field trips, Google Lit Trips allows users to track the fictional journeys of beloved literary characters..."

_____

by the way...

Google Lit Trips fans should be on the alert tons of news about to burst.

 

 ~ www.GoogleLitTrips.org ~

brought to you by GLT Global ED an educational nonprofit aka Google Lit Trips

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Big Anthony: His Story

Big Anthony: His Story | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:

8 May 2014

 

Announcing the publication of a Tour Builder version of the recently updated original Google Lit Trip for Big Anthony: His Story by Tomie DePaola.

 

Pleased to have had the chance to meet and speak with author Tomie DePaola on his recent book tour stop at our local independent bookstore. 

 

 ~ www.GoogleLitTrips.com ~

brought to you by GLT Global ED, an educational nonprofit

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Anne Frank: The Diary of a Young Girl

Anne Frank: The Diary of a Young Girl | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:

8 May 2014

 

The Google Lit Trips project is proud to  announce the publication of a Google Tour Builder version of  the Lit Trip for Anne Frank: The Diary of a Young Girl.

 

We have also refreshed the original Google Earth version of The Diary of a Young Girl Lit Trip as well.

 

 ~ www.GoogleLitTrips.com ~

brought to you by GLT Global ED an educational nonprofit

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General Mills Reverses Controversial Policy

General Mills Reverses Controversial Policy | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
General Mills has reversed a new policy that sparked outrage among consumers.

General Mills last week revealed a new rule that prevented people from joining class action lawsuits if they "joined [its] online communities." Such actions m...
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:

21 April 2014

 

It was less than one hour ago that I scooped and article about General Motors' questionable "small print" might make a wonderfully engaging exercise in Informational Reading.

 

And now, optimism springs eternal. General Mills did not get away with it! Public outrage at General Mills' audacious assumption of "just how gullible their market is" back fires. Lless than a week later, the good guys win and General Mills, though still clinging to its proclaimed justification,

 

Informational Reading Skills take the day.

 

 ~ www.GoogleLitTrips.com ~

Brought to you by GLT Global ED, an educational nonprofit.

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The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck UPDATED

The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck UPDATED | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it

Another classic Google Lit Trip updated in preparation for the new COMING-SOMETIME-SOON completely updated and redesigned website.

GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:

11 October 2014

__________

IMPORTANT INFO FOR THOSE USING GOOGLE LIT TRIPS

We're updating almost all existing Lit Trips in preparation for the launch of our redesigned website. As each update is completed it is being posted on the current website. Both the current versions and the updated versions will work. However, previous media in previous versions may not continue to work well once the transition is made to the new website.

__________

 We've just updated the Lit Trip for The Grapes of Wrath. Lots of new media, updated, discussion starters, and supplementary weblinks.  The following Lit Trips have already been updated for the new website ready and are now available on existing website: 

The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck

Flotsam by David Wiesner

Sam Patch Daredevil  Jumper by Julie Cummins

Going Home by Margaret Wild

A Walk in London by Salvatore Rubbino

A Family Apart by Joan Lowery Nixon

Abuela by Arthur Dorros

Big Anthony: His Story by Tomie DePaola

Make Way for Ducklings by Robert McCloskey

Number the Stars by Lois Lowry

By the Great Hornspoon by Sid Fleishman


 ~ www.GoogleLitTrips.org ~

brought to you by GLT Global ED a tax-exempt educational nonprofit

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GoogleLitTrips Reading List's curator insight, October 11, 2:56 PM

11 October 2014

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IMPORTANT INFO FOR THOSE USING GOOGLE LIT TRIPS

We're updating almost all existing Lit Trips in preparation for the launch of our redesigned website. As each update is completed it is being posted on the current website. Both the current versions and the updated versions will work. However, previous media in previous versions may not continue to work well once the transition is made to the new website.

__________

 

 We've just updated the Lit Trip for The Grapes of Wrath. Lots of new media, updated, discussion starters, and supplementary weblinks.  The following Lit Trips have already been updated for the new website ready and are now available on existing website:

The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck

Flotsam by David WiesnerSam Patch Daredevil  Jumper by Julie Cummins

Going Home by Margaret Wild

A Walk in London by Salvatore Rubbino

Family Apart by Joan Lowery Nixon

Abuela by Arthur Dorros

Big Anthony: His Story by Tomie DePaola

Make Way for Ducklings by Robert McCloskey

Number the Stars by Lois Lowry

By the Great Hornspoon by Sid Fleishman


 ~ www.GoogleLitTrips.org ~

brought to you by GLT Global ED a tax-exempt educational nonprofit

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What is Literature for? - THE BIG IDEAS - YouTube

Why should we spend our time reading novels and poems when, out there, big things are going on? The School of Life explains why we should be reading - and ho...
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:

21 September 2014

 

I really don't know if high school students would be responsive or not to this. But, it's a very interesting defense of Literature as a valuable way to spend some time. 

 

And more importantly it emphasizes the real reason why we teach great literature. It is a great preparation for the REALLY important test.

 

No, not that one. 

 

Life itself is the really important test. 

 

My question..."Where else in the curriculum do we attend to these very important life lessons?"

 

 ~ www.GoogleLitTrips.org ~

brought to you by GLT Global ED aka Google Lit Trips an educational nonprofit

 

 

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Why a good book is a secret door

Why a good book is a secret door | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
Childhood is surreal. Why shouldn't children's books be? In this whimsical talk, award-winning author Mac Barnett speaks about writing that escapes the page, art as a doorway to wonder -- and what real kids say to a fictional whale.
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:

20 September 2014

 

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NOTE: IF YOU FIND THIS TED TALK INTERESTING, SEE OUR OTHER SCOOP-IT ENTRY FOR TODAY,  "WHY ARE FAIRY TALES UNIVERSALLY APPEALING?"

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One of the difficulties in teaching literary reading these days...well, make that..."teaching literary reading has always been," is defending its value in "the real world."  

 

Whether one is defending literary reading in terms of its value in preparing for college and career, or defending the belief that learning the value of contemplating the great questions of life is as important, or sometimes even more important than learning the skill of calculating a correct answer, or defending the belief that the "lies" of great fiction is much like defending the value of the  candy coating on children's medicine; enticing readers to swallow the otherwise often bitter pill of of some of life's most important truths whether they be the big bad wolves that inhabit the forest or the big bad wolves of Wall Street, fiction's value is that it provides a palatable mode of engaging us in the contemplation of some of life's bitter truths while offering hope that life's sweetest truths have a chance IF WE TAKE OUR MEDICINE seriously.

 

In TRUTH, FICTION is always about the tensions between good and evil. We connect and through the magic of suspension of disbelief, we want to know how it turns out, whether the good or the bad win. In the process of caring about fiction we both consciously and unconsciously  absorb deeper understandings of why the bad do what they do, why what they do is bad, and what the good  do or do not do to prevent or repair the damage done by the bad.

 

We can learn from FICTION because it mirrors TRUTH by engaging us via humor, excitement, fear, and a wide variety of techniques that we welcome and thereby like the candy-coated medicine, we take that medicine eagerly because we learn to care about what TRULY good people have always cared about.

 

 ~ www.GoogleLitTrips.com ~

brought to you by GLT Global ED aka Google Lit Trips, an educational nonprofit

 

 

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Luisa Cuesta's curator insight, September 20, 2:00 PM

Una fantástica forma de ver la literatura para niños. Además de ser bastante cómico!

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Travel the (Google Maps) World with Literary Characters!

Travel the (Google Maps) World with Literary Characters! | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
If you're looking for a way to incorporate STEM concepts and Common Core concepts into your k-12 fiction lesson, look no further. Our Research and Instruction Librarian, Kim Miller, found an excell...
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:

29 July 2014

 

Short and sweet but always an honor to be recognized favorably by University Librarians and Colleges of Education.

 

 ~ www.GoogleLitTrips.org ~

brought to you by GLT Global ED aka Google Lit Trips, an educational nonprofit

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There Are 7 Types of English Surnames — Which One Is Yours? |

There Are 7 Types of English Surnames — Which One Is Yours? | | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
Many of us have surnames passed down to us from ancestors in England. Last names weren’t widely used until after the Norman conquest in 1066, but as the country’s population grew, people found it necessary to be more specific when they were talking about somebody else. Thus arose descriptions like Thomas the Baker, Norman son… Read more
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:

9 September 2015

 

Though essentially a promotion for ancestry.com, this article on the origins of the 7 types of English surnames provides an interesting (as in engaging) look into the etymology of last names. 

 

Why is it more interesting to students than traditional attempts to make etymology interesting? My guess is that it's because every student has a last name. And, every student has friends; all of whom have last names. 

 

The bottom line? They have a reason to care.

 

Might even be an interesting "into" activity for working with word roots.

 

The next step might be to extend the engagement into Vygotsky's Zone of Proximal Development, but exploring the same concept across cultures. 

 

 ~ www.GoogleLitTrips.org ~

brought to you by GLT Global ED, an educational nonprofit

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27 Signs It's DEFINITELY Time To Go Back To School

27 Signs It's DEFINITELY Time To Go Back To School | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
If you come across any of these while dropping your kids off at school, just keep driving.

In addition to some hilariously questionable phrasing, these signs indicate that it's time for some serious spelling and grammar lessons -- not to mention a...
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:

5 September 2014

 

Ah! Nothing like promoting high standards!

 

At least they did not profess to be "COMMITED to RAZING the standards."

 

Yes there are several more cringe-worthy examples.

 

 ~ www.GoogleLitTrips.org ~

brought to you by GLT Global ED an educational nonprofit

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The danger of silence

The danger of silence | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
"We spend so much time listening to the things people are saying that we rarely pay attention to the things they don't," says slam poet and teacher Clint Smith. A short, powerful piece from the heart, about finding the courage to speak up against ignorance and injustice.
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:

15 August 2014

 

Wow! A must watch. A must share. A must become.

 

~ www.GoogleLitTrips.org ~

brought to you by GLT Global Ed an educational nonprofit

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Episode 45: Talking With Jerome Burg

Episode 45: Talking With Jerome Burg | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
In this episode: Mike talks with Jerome Burg about Google Lit Trips and more...  
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:

12 August 2014

 

I was honored to have been interviewed by Mike Vollmert for his and Andrew Schwab's great "The reboot ED Podcast."  

 

Here it is in its "unedited as it happened" wholeness. We galloped through a wide range of Google Lit Trips topics. I was very happy to have had a chance to touch many of my favorite bases including a bit of a discussion about the underlying pedagogy upon which Google Lit Trips are based, cross-curricular and cross-cultural goals, even CCSS ELA issues, and a few of the new directions coming down the line for the project.

 

If you happen to have not visited The reboot ED Podcast before, take a look. Mike and Andrew have interviewed some big voices in the ED Tech world.

 

 ~ www.GoogleLitTrips.org ~

brought to you by GLT Global ED a 501(c)(3) educational nonprofit 

 

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INCIDENTAL COMICS: Conflict in Literature

INCIDENTAL COMICS: Conflict in Literature | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:

10 August 2014

 

And there you have it. Great Literature  has always been Virtual Reality at its best. And, the best Fiction has always reflected humanity's deepest Truths. 

 

 ~ www.GoogleLitTrips.org ~

brought to you by GLT Global ED a 501(c)(3) educational nonprofit

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Evaluating Weird Al’s Rules of Usage in His New “Word Crimes” Video

Evaluating Weird Al’s Rules of Usage in His New “Word Crimes” Video | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
“Weird Al” Yankovic is back with a vengeance this week, releasing a new video every day to celebrate the release of his new (and possibly last) album, Mandatory Fun. Yesterday he debuted the Jack Black- and Kristen Schaal-featuring video for “Happy” parody “Tacky,” and this afternoon he unveiled the video...
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:

17 July 2014

Yeah! Where have I been? Planning several new and exciting twists and turns for the Google Lit Trips project.

 

But, when I came across this, though the TO DO List is long, I couldn't help but want to share it with my Language Arts Lovin' friends out there.

 

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A WARNING: MOST LANGUAGE ARTS EDUCATORS WILL FIND BIG AL YANKOVIC'S "WORD CRIMES" VIDEO TO BE PRETTY AMUSING. 

 

BUT IT WOULD BE UNWISE TO ASSUME THAT IT IS APPROPRIATE TO SHARE WITH YOUR STUDENTS WITHOUT CONSIDERING THE CLEVER BUT EDGY ADVISE YANKOVIC  PROVIDES BEGINNING AT THE 2:19 MARK.

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I've never been more than sort of amused by Big Al Yankovic's parody songs. Some struck me as silly; others as well, sort of amusing.

But, I couldn't help but watch his brand new video entitled "Word Crimes." I have to admit, it's pretty interesting.

 

When searching for it, I came across this article that includes the video, but also does an interesting review of Yankovic's own grammar expertise.

 

And I must admit that I was guilty of assuming that someone had decided to play grammar cop and spend his or her words ridiculing the crimes being indicted in the song. 

 

I've always wondered exactly what the joy is for educators who for reasons I never understood, feel that the best way to help kids who struggle with grammar or who haven't yet discovered a real reason to care about grammar rules, is to elevate their noses, whip out their red pens and rubricate all over the kid's effort.

 

WHAT? "Rubricate" a verb?

 

Note this quote from English Ecclesiatical History, "...for he burneth them, he hangeth them, he drowneth them, imprisioneth and famisheth them, and so maketh truer martyrs of Christ, than any other of his new shrined saints whom he has so dignified in his calendar; for the one he doth rubricate only with his red letters, the other doth he rubricate with their own blood."

 

The word's origins are in a reference to "Christ's" spilled blood; originally referencing a sacredness to biblical text using red letters. 

 

So, "rubricating with blood" somehow eventually became marking up a kid's essay by spilling red ink all over it.

 

But I digress. I've long wondered whether excessive rubrication, blood red or other hued, is the most effective way of encouraging students to care about learning what we understand to be important communication skills. 

 

Not that mechanics, usage, and grammar (MUG) are not important. They most certainly are. That's why publishers hire editors.

 

The question is NOT whether mechanics, usage, and grammar are important. The question is what are the most successful practices for encouraging kids to care about their communication skills?

 

Ironically, we all know that it is not easy to engage kids in caring about mechanics, usage and grammar; at least not without the carrot (or is it a whip?) of THE TEST. 

 

I'm just wondering if Big Al Yankovic's alternative attempt at attempting to blend a bit of clever entertainment might be worth considering. 

 

Now, I've gotta  get back to those exciting new twists and turns for Google Lit Trips!

 

www.GoogleLitTrips.com ~

brought to you by GLT Global ED an educational nonprofit aka Google Lit Trips.

 

 

 

 

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The Slave Dancer by Paula Fox

The Slave Dancer by Paula Fox | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
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GoogleLitTrips Reading List's curator insight, May 8, 4:52 PM

8 May 2014

 

Happy to announce The Slave Dancer v4 Google Lit Trips update!

 

 ~ www.GoogleLitTrips.com ~

brought to you by GLT Global ED an educational nonprofit.

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Harper Lee agrees to ebook version of To Kill a Mockingbird

Harper Lee agrees to ebook version of To Kill a Mockingbird | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
Author announces on her 88th birthday that novel will be released as ebook and downloadable audiobook on 8 July
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:

28 April 2014

 

With thanks to Rebecca Fortelka, one of my all time favorite former students, here's great news for fans of To Kill a Mockingbird.

 

At 88, Harper Lee is going digital; as have "digital holdouts from JK Rowling to Ray Bradbury changing their minds over the past few years..."

 

Can you read the writing on the tablet? 

 

I've long advocated for the preferred medium of accessing great literature should be determined by the reader. 

 

Let's hear it for one of the greats making it possible for the reader to access her beautiful masterpiece in their preferred medium!

 

 ~ www.GoogleLitTrips.com ~

brought to you by GLT Global ED, an educational nonprofit

 

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