Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading
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Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading
An Educator's Reading List of Contemporary Literature, Literacy, and Reading Issues. Visit us at https://www.GoogleLitTrips.org
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25+ Google Lit Trips adapted for new Google Earth

25+ Google Lit Trips adapted for new Google Earth | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
Google Lit Trips, educational nonprofit, award winning, educational technology, place based storytelling, reading about reading
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:
17 August 2017

Since the release of the new Google Earth for Web, we've been busy adapting the Google Lit Trip library to maximize the viewer experience when imported into the gorgeous new Google Earth for Web. 

With its amazingly beautiful smooth animation and full 3D globe, Google Earth for Web provides the most immersive viewer experience for all computer, chromebook, and tablet users.

We've focused upon our most popular titles first. The current list of fully adapted titles on the website at GoogleLitTrips.org will be updated as we continue our efforts to fully adapt the entire Lit Trip Library over the next few months. 

If there's a title we haven't yet fully adapted, let us know the title and we'll prioritize our efforts to fully adapt remaining Lit Trips based upon demand.

You can email your requests to me at UpdateRequest@GoogleLitTrips.org 

brought to you by GLT Global ED dba Google Lit Trips, an educational nonprofit


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Llandrillo Library's curator insight, August 18, 5:26 AM
Engaging with stories and literature through google maps , with added tutorials and extra questions 
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360-Degree Photographs Invite You Inside America's Most Majestic Libraries

360-Degree Photographs Invite You Inside America's Most Majestic Libraries | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
No library card necessary.
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:
29 May 2017

Simply AWE inspiring. I've been in a few of the most magnificent libraries, but not one of the ones included in this magnificent collection of incredibly beautiful libraries.

My bucket list has been revised!

Though often apparently misattributed to Mark Twain (see: http://quoteinvestigator.com/2012/12/11/cannot-read/) and since rephrased in a variety of ways, I am reminded of one of my favorite "quotes." The version I first heard is as follows:

"Those who do not read are no better than those who cannot."



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Google Geo Teacher Institute Applications OPEN!

GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:
27 April 2017

The Google Geo Teacher Institute is always an incredible event. The GREAT news is that it is FREE. 

The IMPORTANT news is that there is a limit on number of applications to be selected. SOOOO... 

If you can get yourself here and have a place to stay, everything else is FREE. Including Breakfast and Lunch! And, if you haven't been to the GOOGLEPLEX in Mountain View, California. Oh Wow. What an experience!

This year will be beyond special as Google has been hard at work bringing Google Earth and other mapping tools to new levels of exquisite!

And yes, it's true! Google Earth on Chromebooks!!!

And, of course, besides all kinds of Google Lit Trips news, we'll be sharing incredible ways to bring Geo education to all curricular areas; all grade levels, and all passionate educators.

brought to you by GLT Global ED | Google Lit Trips,  an educational nonprofit
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Lit Trips on Chromebooks with the New Google Earth

Lit Trips on Chromebooks with the New Google Earth | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
See how to run Google Lit Trips on Chromebooks with the new Google Earth and make stories come alive.
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:
19 April 2017

THIS IS BIG!!! We’re very excited about this new development. 

No sooner did Google add it’s new web-based version of Google Earth (https://earth.google.com/web/) to its mapping resources, than Eric Curts posted this article providing step-by-step directions for viewing Google Lit Trips on Chromebooks with the new Google Earth.  

For the curious and those with the pioneering spirit, Curts does point out  a few minor caveats at this early stage. 

• The new Google Earth Web currently only works when using Chrome browser on computers and Chromebooks. Plans are to expand access to other browser are in the works and should appear soon. 
• Importing KML and KMZ files is still considered “experimental.” 
• There are a few minor bumps that need to be worked out as the KML/KMZ import function is refined. Among those bumps are: 
   - custom place markers are not yet appearing popup windows sometimes don’t quite fit screen view 
   - occasional issues with embedded media 
These and other minor issues will be addressed in the coming weeks. 
 Take a look at the new Google Earth Web. (https://earth.google.com/web/). It’s gorgeous and brings incredible new resources to Google’s mapping suite.

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Sara Rosett's curator insight, April 20, 3:57 PM
This is great! I always love to see innovations that help the reader envision the story!
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Transcript: President Obama on What Books Mean to Him

Transcript: President Obama on What Books Mean to Him | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
Michiko Kakutani, our chief book critic, met with Mr. Obama to discuss the books and writers that have influenced his life and presidency.
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:
16 January 2017

For many years the Google Lit Trips project has used the tagline, "BECAUSE LITERARY READING BRINGS WISDOM TO THE INFORMATION AGE."

In this scooped article President Obama, shares his appreciation for what Literary Reading has meant to him. It is thoughtful, contemplative, and displays the depth of wisdom to which he has been indebted throughout his life. And a depth of thoughtfulness contemplation, and wisdom that may be becoming dangerously absent as President Obama transitions the power of the presidency to his successor.

We are now entering what has been labeled the Post Truth Era. One need not look far to find the "liberties" that are being taken with too many, even at the highest levels, are disregarding the value of truth. 

In recent years, literary reading has had to constantly defend its value in too many curricula. Now, we find ourselves in times where Informational Reading has edged into an area where truth and information may be becoming irrelevant in the minds of far too many adults. 

Many of us who have cherished information and wisdom are wondering what we can do given the apparent pending trajectories at the highest levels of government. 

One thing we can do, and must do is ratchet up our efforts to bring facts, information and wisdom back into the prominence they deserve. 

It's time we Double Down.

 ~ GoogleLitTrips.org ~
Brought to you by GLT Global ED | Google Lit Trips an educational nonprofit


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A River Of 10,000 Books Flood The Streets Of Toronto

A River Of 10,000 Books Flood The Streets Of Toronto | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
Literature Vs Traffic is an ongoing project by Luzinterruptus, an anonymous group that carries out urban interventions in public spaces. For their latest
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:
19 November 2016

Could not help but think that in times when optimism is facing a "Tsunamic" challenge, that remembering that there are good people dedicating some part of their lives to believing in the power of doing good.

I am imagining a portion of a class period beginning something like this...

TEACHER: I'd like each of you to read this article. When you finish, just relax quietly for a few moments until the rest of the class has had time to finish.

When everyone is finished there will be a quiz. But, I don't want you to stress so I'll tell you the quiz question before you begin reading. Don't worry, I won't collect the quiz because their won't be any quiz to collect.

So here it is...
KNOWING YOURSELF BETTER THAN ANYONE, Being honest with yourself how would you answer this question??

If this was going to happen in our community, truthfully I would probably:
A. Help make it happen
B. Probably wouldn't help, but I'd go see it and probably look for some books to take.
C. Do nothing other than criticize it as being __________ .
D. Not even become aware that it had been planned or even happened.
E. ______________

Just wondering. 

You'd never know the results because the "rules" are that you promised the students not to collect the results.

And, here's a quiz for you.

KNOWING YOURSELF BETTER THAN ANYONE, Being honest with yourself how would you answer this question??

If I really decided to try this experiment, truthfully my guess would be that the results would probably look something like this ________________ .

The big challenge...
Really. Don't check their answers and don't check your answers. Just let yourself wonder about the unknown results for as short or as long a time as you do.

brought to you by GLT Global ED | Google Lit Trips, an educational nonprofit
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Bob Dylan Wins Nobel Prize, Redefining Boundaries of Literature

Bob Dylan Wins Nobel Prize, Redefining Boundaries of Literature | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
The singer and songwriter was recognized for “new poetic expressions within the great American song tradition.”
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:
14 October 2016

Fifty years ago, December 5, 1965 to be exact, Bob Dylan changed my life forever. Actually, the credit should go to Mr. Ferdie Kay, my senior English teacher at James Logan High School in Union City, CA. It was Mr. Kay who decided to begin his poetry unit by taking the class on a field trip to Berkeley California to see Bob Dylan in concert. 

Dylan was a bit of an odd duck in the current music scene. He wasn't rock 'n roll, wasn't exactly folk, had what was considered a terrible singing voice, and sang songs with nearly unintelligible lyrics. At least they seemed unintelligible to this late bloomer who never surfed, but was more attracted to the Beach Boys nevertheless. 

Yet, I had a peripheral interest in Peter Paul and Mary as well as Joan Baez. Mostly because of their "pleasant" voices and accessible and meaningful lyrics.

Dylan on the other hand seemed to pander to no one. His audience needed to ponder his words and forgive his voice. 

The concert was on a Sunday night, the next day in class Mr. Kay had a life changing lesson plan. We dissected one of Dylan's songs and it was the first time I remember ever feeling as though I actually began to see the "writing between the lines" that so many previous English teachers had expected me to see. He didn't tell us what to see, but rather guided us to discover what was there to consider and to begin to see the bridge between Dylan's lyrics and our own life experiences. It was exhilarating. 

By the end of the week Mr. Kay challenged us to find that exhilaration while exploring T. S. Eliot. And, we did. Mr. Kay had brought Dylan to us instead of the traditional approach of attempting to bring us to the authors who often lived in different times, different cultures, and who wrote in a version of English that just didn't quite generate a sense that their work was worth the effort. But, again, I was a "late bloomer." I was still in the cocoon of self centered "me-ness." But, Mr. Kay and Bob Dylan mark the moment when I began the long process of escaping that cocoon.

By June 1966 I'd made up my mind to become an English teacher just like Mr. Kay. I even grew a beard just like Mr. Kay's that I've worn ever since. My own career as an English teacher spanned 4 decades; a career dedicated to being the kind of teacher for my students that Mr. Kay had been for his.

Congratulations Bob Dylan. You've made millions differences to millions of people.
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Powerful Drawings Show What It Feels Like To Be Lost In A Book

Powerful Drawings Show What It Feels Like To Be Lost In A Book | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
Korean artist Jungho Lee reminds us that reading a book is the best adventure.
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:
20 September 2016

How cool are these? Like all great books these images reward those who take a second or third look.

There's more there there.

 ~ www.GoogleLit Trips.org ~
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Every Book Referenced On Season 4 Of "Orange Is The New Black"

Every Book Referenced On Season 4 Of "Orange Is The New Black" | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
Orange Is the New Black book club, anyone?..
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:
18 July 2016

I count myself as a fan of Orange is the New Black. Like many important issues it brought to our attention some of the most difficult issues not only within our prison systems, but also in the world at large.

Yes there were many very rough to face scenes. But Not turning away from that which we are uncomfortable being encouraged to consider is sometimes what it takes to face the truth that there is still much work to be done.

So, having noticed that many of the characters spent time reading, but the titles of their books flashed by too quickly to catch, I was happy to see that a complete list was provided for each episode of Season 4.

Haven't read many, but several were close to my heart including but not limited to Rainer Maria Rilke's Letter to a Young Poet, Ian Flemming's Casino Royale and Goldfinger (remembering fondly the master high school teacher who said I could read Ian Flemming for a personal reading projects as long as I read them all! My first author study and it was an eye opening experience), Chimamanda Ngozi's Americana;  L. Frank Baum's (the real) The Wizard of Oz, and of course Harper Lee's To Kill A Mockingbird. 

brought to you by GLT Global ED / Google Lit Trips

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Want More Dates? Survey Says You Should Read More Books

Want More Dates? Survey Says You Should Read More Books | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
#Truth.
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:
21 June 2016

Yep! And there's even an App for that!

What are you doing for your first day's lesson in your literature class?

I might well be starting with this INFORMATIONAL READING article. 

My favorite line? 

"The findings aren’t all that surprising, considering a 2014 Pew Research study that showed millennials — the generation most likely to be using dating apps — are actually more likely to have read a book in the past year than folks from other generations. While the narrative may be that books need saving, it would seem that the pastime is alive as ever."


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11 Exercises That'll Make Book Lovers Excited To Work Out

11 Exercises That'll Make Book Lovers Excited To Work Out | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it

"Note: The following exercises were created for satirical purposes. But if you try these at home and get more fitness and reading in, email the authors so they can feel good about their lives."

GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:
29 May 2016

Did you burn more calories than pages you read today?

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Why You May Be Seeing Stacks Of Books All Over NYC

Why You May Be Seeing Stacks Of Books All Over NYC | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
“The people who’ve taken part in the project are now connected to me in this weird [but good] way."
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:
30 March 2016

I've always been intrigued by conceptual art. Stacks of books left, beautifully photographed and .... and what?

What became of them? 

"Shaheryar Malik has left stacks of books from his own library at popular destinations all over New York City. He doesn’t stick around to see if anyone takes one of his books, nor does he re-visit his stacks. Instead he leaves a bookmark with his email address printed on it inside each book, in the hopes that he’ll hear back from whomever decided to pick that book up."

So many stories and the unknown stories of what became of those stories. How many lives did each story live? And how many lives were touched in how many ways? 

Had you come across one of these remarkable stacks, what do you imagine you might have done? 

Gosh, I sure do love a great mystery!

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Five more Google Lit Trips UPDATES!

Five more Google Lit Trips UPDATES! | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:

15 May 2015

 

Today we posted five updated Google Lit Trips including Journey to Topaz, The Kite Runner, Lost! Marching for Freedom and Night

 

This brings the total number of updated Lit Trips to 29 so far this month. 

 

See the complete list of updated Lit Trips at www.GoogleLitTrips.org 

 

IMPORTANT: ALL Google Lit Trips are being updated in anticipation of our imminent transition to our new website.  Older versions may soon not work properly.

 

 ~ GoogleLitTrips.org ~

Google Lit Trips is the flagship project of GLT Global ED, a 501c3 educational nonprofit

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How to design a library that makes kids want to read

How to design a library that makes kids want to read | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
When Michael Bierut was tapped to design a logo for public school libraries, he had no idea that he was embarking on a years-long passion project. In this often hilarious talk, he recalls his obsessive quest to bring energy, learning, art and graphics into these magical spaces where school librarians can inspire new generations of readers and thinkers.
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:
3 June 2017

I've recently scooped articles about gorgeous libraries and about photographing and quoting librarians. 

This scoop is about a frequently "smile-inducingly" thought provoking TED Talk addressing the challenge of revisiting the influence of library design on engaging kids in reading. 

NOTE: I did not write "the challenge of engaging kids in reading. I did write "...the challenge of revisiting the influence of library design." 

At the heart of this talk is the concept of accepting the possibilities that unanticipated consequences might not only be unwelcome and to be avoided, but that they also just might be the welcome serendipitous rewards of being open to the discovering unanticipated benefits; the "Ah Ha!" moments in life that only come to those who in one way or another are receptive to realizing discovery. 

The question I suppose is not to ask what we do in our libraries that engage the engaged readers, but what do we do in our libraries to entice the "not-so-engaged readers? What works? What doesn't really work? What might be more engaging to those who just do not find our attempts to entice enticing?

brought to you by GLT Global ED | Google Lit Trips an educational nonprofit


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Portraits Of Librarians Celebrate America's Bookish Unsung Heroes

Portraits Of Librarians Celebrate America's Bookish Unsung Heroes | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
“Libraries are more important to our world than people realize."
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:
25 May 2017

"“Librarians are warrior princes and princesses wielding book love like words! We are ever vigilant, curious, intelligent, and kind. Libraries are the banners that we carry proudly into the fray! Forward, ever Forward!”
~ Susan K .McClelland, Adult and Teen Services Librarian at Oak Park Public Library

Hoping this book becomes a best seller!

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Librarians School Ivanka Trump After Tone-Deaf Tweet

Librarians School Ivanka Trump After Tone-Deaf Tweet | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
She clearly misread the situation.
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:
20 April 2017

When people say what they think we want to hear and do what we don't want them to do? What do we teach our students?

We're talking libraries as a priority for a civil, thoughtful and informed society. Ivanka's supportive words clash harshly with the actions of the administration and president to which she is a primary advisor.

Is she being devious or oblivious?

Empty nice words during National Library Week are particularly meaningless while support for Libraries is being drastically slashed.

What's that old saying? "Put your money where your mouth is."

Please.

 ~ GoogleLitTrips.org ~
brought to you by GLT Global ED | Google Lit Trips




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Was the Book Better? I No Longer Care

In defense of enjoying stories however you end up enjoying them.
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:
7 April 2017
Oh my! Blasphemy? Or, thinking outside a rusty box?

It's a long held belief, with much solid supporting evidence, that the book is always better; that alternate media adaptations are always "less." I suppose that I generally fall in line with this line of thought. I even believe that the much beloved film version of To Kill A Mockingbird, as good as it is, falls far short of depth  and breadth to be found in the novel. 

I have cringeworthy recollections of standing in line at Blockbuster (remember them?) behind a group of AP English students giggling about how well they'd done on multiple tests without reading a word of the book thanks to Blockbuster. 

However, I also have recollections of multiple struggling readers who had the love of reading destroyed by being assigned books well beyond their reading skill sets. 

Yet, the author Emily Wenstrom offers an interesting take on the issue. 

Wenstrom does not actually argue that argue that the book is not better; though she does offer a few challenges to this belief. What she argues is that it is the story and that given "Thanks to disruptors like Netflix, Amazon, and HBO, television is in a new golden age." 

The truth? There is much absolutely exquisite story telling happening in video formats. Anyone reading this not yet found him or herself becoming a dedicated binge watcher of any on the high end series being provided by these and other media sources?

In my mind it's not a question of one OR the other. Nor is the question of paper-based books OR digital books. 

All this aside, I still do believe that LITERARY READING is incredibly important. But, we should be careful about the ironic outcome of an increasing number of students who get absolutely turned off to literary reading; many of whom actually do a significant amount of literary reading that falls outside of what is considered "worthwhile" in too many classrooms. Perhaps we ought to consider having two objectives for literary reading. The first being the objective of creating future English majors; the second for creating lifelong readers regardless of their future career choices.

Good storytelling in any format is good for everyone.

brought to you by GLT Global ED | Google Lit Trips, an educational nonprofit


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8 Offbeat Literary Genres to Get Lost In by Dictionary.com

8 Offbeat Literary Genres to Get Lost In by Dictionary.com | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
Empty description
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:
19 December 2016 
Serendipity. While working on a Google Lit Trip for Gogol's short story "The Nose" I wanted to create a link to a definition for the word "thither." While looking for a link on dictionary.com I wandered around and discovered that scrolling down past all of the information relating to the word "thither" under a heading called "Discover our greatest slideshows" there were several links to other interesting content.

 "8 Offbeat Literary Genres to Get..." caught my eye and like I frequently do, I went on a serendipity digression. And,I'll be darned. Having majored in English, earned a teaching credential in teaching English and taught high school English for nearly four decades I discovered that I had never heard of three of these offbeat literary genres, and not given a second thought about another 2-3 of them beyond the last test on naming genres that I probably had to pass 40 or more years ago. When was the last time you had a chance to drop "Bildungsroman" into a conversation? or "Wuxia," or "Penny Dreadful"? 

Though not a sterling student, I might well have found these words interesting, if not useful for anything other than as content matter for my bent sense of curiosity. For some reason, I was early on attracted to cool words whether they appeared to be useful or not. I remember learning the word "omphaloskeptic." Don't know it? Don't look it up before looking at the photo of a statue in the Louvre of four ompaloskeptics. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Omphaloskepsis#/media/File:Satyres_en_Atlante_Rome_Louvre_2.jpg What a cool word! 

Yeah, but how much time should we spend upon elements of language arts that 95% of our students and English majors, and even English teachers never really find a use for? Yet contrary to what one might expect, my answer is NOT none. None is fine I suppose. But, building bridges between language arts and curiosity or just plain fun can play a part in building an attentive interest in the importance of language arts and learning just for the serendipitous heck of it. 

I used to spend 10 minutes a week on Fridays playing word games via slide presentations. The already motivated students enjoyed the competition and the learning and the less engaged enjoyed the novelty of language and poetry, and writing. It was just a passing subversive encouragement by not letting it become boring or something to worry about being on the test but still "something new." 

One of my greatest early sources was The Play of Words: Fun & Games for Language Lovers Paperback – September 1, 1991 by Richard Lederer

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25 More Outstanding Podcasts for Readers

25 More Outstanding Podcasts for Readers | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
Last year I highlighted 25 of the best podcasts for readers. Here are 25 more outstanding podcasts for book lovers!
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:
17 November 2016

This is a followup article to the first 25 Outstanding Podcasts for Readers that can be found here: https://bookriot.com/2015/11/25/25-outstanding-podcasts-readers/


Try this...

Have Tinitus? Listen to a literary podcast as you go to sleep.

Too many commercials on your morning drive to school? Listen to a literary podcast and arrive at school smiling.

Build listening to literary podcasts into your students' options as individuals or small group activity. There are so many similar podcasts promoting a love of literature that students can personalize their listening AND get credit for it.

Several focus upon author interviews. Why not have students do Author Reports consisting of reporting on the experience of choosing an author focused podcast and then having read a story of their own choice by that author.


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Here’s How Long It Took To Write Your Favorite Book

Here’s How Long It Took To Write Your Favorite Book | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
Who's the speediest novelist of them all?
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:
2 October 2016

The title says it all. Interesting graphic. Several titles are popular in classroom curricula. Any surprises?

By the way, titles are listed by not only "time to write" but also number of pages.

Try this, find the book with the longest writing time AND the least number of pages and calculate the time per page rate.

And of course the reverse math with the title with the shortest writing time AND the most number of pages.

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Google Lit Trips - Combining Literature and Geography

Google Lit Trips - Combining Literature and Geography | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
Imagine bringing the locations of stories to life for your students. With the help of Google Lit Trips, you can! This free resource gets kids excited!
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:
11 August 2016

Always a treat and an honor to wake up and find a kind mention of the Google Lit Trips project among my Google Alerts.

brought to you by GLT Global ED / Google Lit Trips an educational nonprofit
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It’s Finally Time To Stop Correcting People’s Grammar, Linguist Says

It’s Finally Time To Stop Correcting People’s Grammar, Linguist Says | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
"Language -- which all human societies have in immense grammatical complexity -- is far more interesting than pedantry."
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:
2 July 2016

Wondering to what extent this article will be applauded or roundly abhorred by the professional ELA community. 

Try this quote from the article  while wearing a blood pressure cuff...

_____
(referring to author Oliver Kamm) 

"A recovering pedant himself, he now speaks for the boldest form of descriptivism, arguing that if humans use a word outside of its traditional meaning, the new, creative use is now valid, simply by virtue of having been used at all. So, “literally” can mean “figuratively,” and “irregardless” can mean “regardless.” Adverbs — probably the mostly hotly debated part of speech — are welcome in Kamm’s world, as are split infinitives and sentences that start with “and.”
____

Is your reaction to the previous quote influenced at all by this quote, also from author Oliver Kamm...

_____
"... I think language tuition is better focused on the need to express yourself to the right audience. Linguists refer to “register” — the different styles and ranges of formality we adopt for particular audiences. That’s not all there is to effective writing and speaking but it’s not stressed enough in usage guides."
_____

The essential understanding that one's audience ought to strongly influence the level of the "properness" of one's speech and writing does seem to be fading at a disturbing rate.

Yet, simultaneously, for example, the demonization of the term "political correctness;" too often code for old fashioned sexism, racism, xenophobia, and so many other forms of adamant ignorance all too common even at  the highest levels of public discourse has become seriously worrisome.


 ~ GoogleLitTrips.org ~
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Google Lit Trips: Books Come Alive | Sweet Integrations

Google Lit Trips: Books Come Alive | Sweet Integrations | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
Make your books come alive with Google Lit Trips. Your students will love visiting all the locations mentioned in your book.
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:
17 June 2016

I am so happy to have decided to spend my retirement after nearly 40 years teaching, by supporting educators, teachers, and students from around the world.

Articles such as this truly warm my heart.

brought to you by GLT Global ED dba Google Lit Trips, an educational nonprofit
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Historical Fiction Gets No Respect -- Here's Why It Should

Historical Fiction Gets No Respect -- Here's Why It Should | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
Katy Simpson Smith, author of the new novel 'Free Men,' on the joys and frustrations of exploring the past.
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:
1 April 2016

Yesterday I scooped an article entitled "Fiction v nonfiction – English literature's made-up divide." In my comments, while recognizing some of the benefits, I expressed concerns about the downside of genre classifications in the classroom.

When I came across this article, it seemed perfect follow-up evidence that genre classifications can have deleterious  impact upon readers by passing on the de facto bias of literary scholarship to students who may not be on track to become Literature majors. 

A question arose in my mind...
If we who teach literature teachers were evaluated upon the following two criteria, would we consider our efforts successful?
1. What percentage of our students grow up to be Literature teachers, scholars, or some kind of literati-type?
2. What percentage of our students become completely turned off as life-long readers specifically because of the esoteric nature of our efforts to have them read literature like scholars do?

Of, course the fallacy of my reducing the assessment of our efforts to these two categories, overlooks what we hope is still a significantly large portion of our students; that group that does not grow up to be literature scholars, but does gain a depth of appreciation for what they do read that does motivate them to become lifelong readers. 

That concession being made, ironically, I am reminded of Howard Zinn's A People's History of the United States, a powerful attack on established tendency of curricula in universities that tends to pass on the biases of historical events taught in schools, from generation to generation, rather than to encourage a reconsideration of those often un-reconsidered biases to see if perhaps Custer was not so much of a hero as we had previously taught our students that he had been.

Transitioning the thought to the literary arts, we have made progress in reconsidering the long held biases that previously held reign in literary curricula. Consider the reduction in assumption that the "Dead White Poets" were worth more than women writers, writers of color, and cross-cultural global writers. 

But, to see educators still passing on biases implying or outright accusing genres such as science fiction, historical fiction, YA lit, as being "entirely" second rate at best by some sort of "default fault" is doing not only harm to our students who we hope to become life-long readers regardless of their eventual career decisions, but ironically even to those we hope will choose to become bearers of the literary torch who I personally, would hope would not enter future classroom, noses aloft, telling students that what they like to read is essentially trash or unworthy just because "those types" of books have always been under appreciated by too many university curricula planners.

Let us not throw a "one-size-fits-all" blanket of condemnation over historical fiction, science, fiction, YA and any other "genres" who have been so condemned. 

brought to you by GLT Global ED dba Google Lit Trips an educational nonprofit. 


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Lynnette Van Dyke's curator insight, April 1, 2016 8:32 PM
1 April 2016

Yesterday I scooped an article entitled "Fiction v nonfiction – English literature's made-up divide." In my comments, while recognizing some of the benefits, I expressed concerns about the downside of genre classifications in the classroom.

When I came across this article, it seemed perfect follow-up evidence that genre classifications can have deleterious  impact upon readers by passing on the de facto bias of literary scholarship to students who may not be on track to become Literature majors. 

A question arose in my mind...
If we who teach literature teachers were evaluated upon the following two criteria, would we consider our efforts successful?
1. What percentage of our students grow up to be Literature teachers, scholars, or some kind of literati-type?
2. What percentage of our students become completely turned off as life-long readers specifically because of the esoteric nature of our efforts to have them read literature like scholars do?

Of, course the fallacy of my reducing the assessment of our efforts to these two categories, overlooks what we hope is still a significantly large portion of our students; that group that does not grow up to be literature scholars, but does gain a depth of appreciation for what they do read that does motivate them to become lifelong readers. 

That concession being made, ironically, I am reminded of Howard Zinn's A People's History of the United States, a powerful attack on established tendency of curricula in universities that tends to pass on the biases of historical events taught in schools, from generation to generation, rather than to encourage a reconsideration of those often un-reconsidered biases to see if perhaps Custer was not so much of a hero as we had previously taught our students that he had been.

Transitioning the thought to the literary arts, we have made progress in reconsidering the long held biases that previously held reign in literary curricula. Consider the reduction in assumption that the "Dead White Poets" were worth more than women writers, writers of color, and cross-cultural global writers. 

But, to see educators still passing on biases implying or outright accusing genres such as science fiction, historical fiction, YA lit, as being "entirely" second rate at best by some sort of "default fault" is doing not only harm to our students who we hope to become life-long readers regardless of their eventual career decisions, but ironically even to those we hope will choose to become bearers of the literary torch who I personally, would hope would not enter future classroom, noses aloft, telling students that what they like to read is essentially trash or unworthy just because "those types" of books have always been under appreciated by too many university curricula planners.

Let us not throw a "one-size-fits-all" blanket of condemnation over historical fiction, science, fiction, YA and any other "genres" who have been so condemned. 

brought to you by GLT Global ED dba Google Lit Trips an educational nonprofit. 


Melanie Hundley's curator insight, April 3, 2016 9:05 AM
1 April 2016

Yesterday I scooped an article entitled "Fiction v nonfiction – English literature's made-up divide." In my comments, while recognizing some of the benefits, I expressed concerns about the downside of genre classifications in the classroom.

When I came across this article, it seemed perfect follow-up evidence that genre classifications can have deleterious  impact upon readers by passing on the de facto bias of literary scholarship to students who may not be on track to become Literature majors. 

A question arose in my mind...
If we who teach literature teachers were evaluated upon the following two criteria, would we consider our efforts successful?
1. What percentage of our students grow up to be Literature teachers, scholars, or some kind of literati-type?
2. What percentage of our students become completely turned off as life-long readers specifically because of the esoteric nature of our efforts to have them read literature like scholars do?

Of, course the fallacy of my reducing the assessment of our efforts to these two categories, overlooks what we hope is still a significantly large portion of our students; that group that does not grow up to be literature scholars, but does gain a depth of appreciation for what they do read that does motivate them to become lifelong readers. 

That concession being made, ironically, I am reminded of Howard Zinn's A People's History of the United States, a powerful attack on established tendency of curricula in universities that tends to pass on the biases of historical events taught in schools, from generation to generation, rather than to encourage a reconsideration of those often un-reconsidered biases to see if perhaps Custer was not so much of a hero as we had previously taught our students that he had been.

Transitioning the thought to the literary arts, we have made progress in reconsidering the long held biases that previously held reign in literary curricula. Consider the reduction in assumption that the "Dead White Poets" were worth more than women writers, writers of color, and cross-cultural global writers. 

But, to see educators still passing on biases implying or outright accusing genres such as science fiction, historical fiction, YA lit, as being "entirely" second rate at best by some sort of "default fault" is doing not only harm to our students who we hope to become life-long readers regardless of their eventual career decisions, but ironically even to those we hope will choose to become bearers of the literary torch who I personally, would hope would not enter future classroom, noses aloft, telling students that what they like to read is essentially trash or unworthy just because "those types" of books have always been under appreciated by too many university curricula planners.

Let us not throw a "one-size-fits-all" blanket of condemnation over historical fiction, science, fiction, YA and any other "genres" who have been so condemned. 

brought to you by GLT Global ED dba Google Lit Trips an educational nonprofit. 


Luke Padilla's curator insight, April 4, 2016 1:38 PM
1 April 2016

Yesterday I scooped an article entitled "Fiction v nonfiction – English literature's made-up divide." In my comments, while recognizing some of the benefits, I expressed concerns about the downside of genre classifications in the classroom.

When I came across this article, it seemed perfect follow-up evidence that genre classifications can have deleterious  impact upon readers by passing on the de facto bias of literary scholarship to students who may not be on track to become Literature majors. 

A question arose in my mind...
If we who teach literature teachers were evaluated upon the following two criteria, would we consider our efforts successful?
1. What percentage of our students grow up to be Literature teachers, scholars, or some kind of literati-type?
2. What percentage of our students become completely turned off as life-long readers specifically because of the esoteric nature of our efforts to have them read literature like scholars do?

Of, course the fallacy of my reducing the assessment of our efforts to these two categories, overlooks what we hope is still a significantly large portion of our students; that group that does not grow up to be literature scholars, but does gain a depth of appreciation for what they do read that does motivate them to become lifelong readers. 

That concession being made, ironically, I am reminded of Howard Zinn's A People's History of the United States, a powerful attack on established tendency of curricula in universities that tends to pass on the biases of historical events taught in schools, from generation to generation, rather than to encourage a reconsideration of those often un-reconsidered biases to see if perhaps Custer was not so much of a hero as we had previously taught our students that he had been.

Transitioning the thought to the literary arts, we have made progress in reconsidering the long held biases that previously held reign in literary curricula. Consider the reduction in assumption that the "Dead White Poets" were worth more than women writers, writers of color, and cross-cultural global writers. 

But, to see educators still passing on biases implying or outright accusing genres such as science fiction, historical fiction, YA lit, as being "entirely" second rate at best by some sort of "default fault" is doing not only harm to our students who we hope to become life-long readers regardless of their eventual career decisions, but ironically even to those we hope will choose to become bearers of the literary torch who I personally, would hope would not enter future classroom, noses aloft, telling students that what they like to read is essentially trash or unworthy just because "those types" of books have always been under appreciated by too many university curricula planners.

Let us not throw a "one-size-fits-all" blanket of condemnation over historical fiction, science, fiction, YA and any other "genres" who have been so condemned. 

brought to you by GLT Global ED dba Google Lit Trips an educational nonprofit. 


Rescooped by GoogleLitTrips Reading List from Reading About Reading
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Students as Explorers: Using Google Earth with Literature

Students as Explorers: Using Google Earth with Literature | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
How to use Google Earth to make literature relevant for students.
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:
3 March 2016

Happy to announce the publication of my blog post for  Education Week at the invitation Heather Singmaster of the Asia Society.

Register at http://www.googlelittrips.org for quick and easy access to our library of Google Lit Trips.

Reminder, Google Lit Trips resources are free.
However, you are always welcome to  to support our efforts and express your appreciation with a paypal donation. 

Short paypal URL: https://goo.gl/XtUvrc

brought to you by GLT Global ED an educational nonprofit also known as Google Lit Trips.
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GoogleLitTrips Reading List's curator insight, March 3, 2016 3:20 PM
3 March 2016

Happy to announce the publication of my blog post for  Education Week at the invitation Heather Singmaster of the Asia Society.

Register at http://www.googlelittrips.org for quick and easy access to our library of Google Lit Trips.

Reminder, Google Lit Trips resources are free.
However, you are always welcome to  to support our efforts and express your appreciation with a paypal donation. 

Short paypal URL: https://goo.gl/XtUvrc

brought to you by GLT Global ED an educational nonprofit also known as Google Lit Trips.
Tannis Niziol's curator insight, March 14, 2016 4:22 PM
3 March 2016
 
Happy to announce the publication of my blog post for  Education Week at the invitation Heather Singmaster of the Asia Society.
 
Register at http://www.googlelittrips.org for quick and easy access to our library of Google Lit Trips.
 
Reminder, Google Lit Trips resources are free.
However, you are always welcome to  to support our efforts and express your appreciation with a paypal donation. 
 
Short paypal URL: https://goo.gl/XtUvrc
 
brought to you by GLT Global ED an educational nonprofit also known as Google Lit Trips.
Lynnette Van Dyke's curator insight, March 26, 2016 7:14 AM
3 March 2016

Happy to announce the publication of my blog post for  Education Week at the invitation Heather Singmaster of the Asia Society.

Register at http://www.googlelittrips.org for quick and easy access to our library of Google Lit Trips.

Reminder, Google Lit Trips resources are free.
However, you are always welcome to  to support our efforts and express your appreciation with a paypal donation. 

Short paypal URL: https://goo.gl/XtUvrc

brought to you by GLT Global ED an educational nonprofit also known as Google Lit Trips.