Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading
39.0K views | +0 today
Follow
Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading
An Educator's Reading List of Contemporary Literature, Literacy, and Reading Issues. Visit us at http://www.GoogleLitTrips.org
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by GoogleLitTrips Reading List
Scoop.it!

Every Book Referenced On Season 4 Of "Orange Is The New Black"

Every Book Referenced On Season 4 Of "Orange Is The New Black" | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
Orange Is the New Black book club, anyone?..
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:
18 July 2016

I count myself as a fan of Orange is the New Black. Like many important issues it brought to our attention some of the most difficult issues not only within our prison systems, but also in the world at large.

Yes there were many very rough to face scenes. But Not turning away from that which we are uncomfortable being encouraged to consider is sometimes what it takes to face the truth that there is still much work to be done.

So, having noticed that many of the characters spent time reading, but the titles of their books flashed by too quickly to catch, I was happy to see that a complete list was provided for each episode of Season 4.

Haven't read many, but several were close to my heart including but not limited to Rainer Maria Rilke's Letter to a Young Poet, Ian Flemming's Casino Royale and Goldfinger (remembering fondly the master high school teacher who said I could read Ian Flemming for a personal reading projects as long as I read them all! My first author study and it was an eye opening experience), Chimamanda Ngozi's Americana;  L. Frank Baum's (the real) The Wizard of Oz, and of course Harper Lee's To Kill A Mockingbird. 

brought to you by GLT Global ED / Google Lit Trips

.


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by GoogleLitTrips Reading List
Scoop.it!

20 Bands Named After Classic Literature

20 Bands Named After Classic Literature | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:
31 March 2016

As they say "Hope Springs Eternal." The literary influence of literature in popular music is a good sign. Okay, I was only aware of a small number of these bands. But truthfully that enhances my joy in that I am happy to see that much of the contemporary music scene with which I have limited experience is populated by musicians finding inspiration in the reading.

Though the article contains "only" 20 Bands Named After Classic Literature," (some of which may or may not qualify under a strict definition of "Classic") don't miss reading many additional literary titles added to the list in the comment section.

It just feels good that classic or otherwise, reading has a place of honor among those bringing music to their many fans.

brought to you by GLT Global ED dba Google Lit Trips an educational nonprofit
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by GoogleLitTrips Reading List
Scoop.it!

Featured Google Lit Trips for Black History Month

Featured Google Lit Trips for Black History Month | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:

5 February 2014

Five Google Lit Trips of particular interest as we celebrate Black History month.

 

- Their Eyes Were Watching God by Zora Neale Hurston

- The Slave Dancer by Paula Fox

- Bud Not Buddy by Christopher Paul Curtis

- Marching for Freedom by Elizabeth Partridge

- The Watsons Go To Birmingham -1963 by Christoperh Paul Curtis

 

 ~ www.GoogleLitTrips.org ~

brought to you by GLT Global ED, an educational nonprofit

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by GoogleLitTrips Reading List
Scoop.it!

Books | The Guardian

Books | The Guardian | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
Latest books news, comment, reviews and analysis from the Guardian
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:

24 January 2014

 

Just a quick note. The Book section of The Guardian has recently become one of my "go to" websites for finding interesting articles for the Reading About Reading blog. 

 

It's a nice mix of "just what the Literature-loving" want and articles that might be of particular interest to those of us who promote life-long reading among our students.

 

Well-worth a bookmark.

 

 ~ www.GoogleLitTrips.org ~

brought to you by GLT Global ED, an educational nonprofit

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by GoogleLitTrips Reading List
Scoop.it!

10 TED Talks from authors

10 TED Talks from authors | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
These well-known writers weave beautiful words on the page … and on the stage.
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:

22 January 2015

 

Like many, I'm spending some time trying to catch all the Oscar nominees for best picture.

 

Over many years, I've only been peripherally interested in the Oscars. But, in 2014 I found myself amazed at the quality of that year's nominees. Remembering Dallas Buyers Club,  12 Years a Slave, Philomena, Nebraska, Captain Phillips, The Wolf of Wall Street, and others, I found the quality of storytelling quite impressive. 

_____

A clarification. The rubric behind this blog post is intentionally focused upon the single criteria of "effective storytelling." In film as in print, I feel comfortable with screenwriters and authors who incorporate "poetic license" in their attempts to create a great storyline.

 

My point here being there's some pretty darned good storytelling going on in film these days. 

 

However, unlike 2014, I've not had the opportunity to see most of this year's nominated films. Counting The Imitation Game which I saw yesterday, I've only seen two of the nominated films; the other being The Grand Budapest Hotel. I have several hours of catching up to do to see the rest before the Oscars.

 

And as an aside to this aside, the same is true in television. I've become quite the Binge Watcher for extremely well-written television series that are finding ways to reach the depths of great novels over the course of a single season. 

_____

 

SO WHAT'S MY POINT?

Whether you pride yourself upon the fact that you have seen them all and are ready for the big night and the current and subsequent conversations regarding those films, OR If you're like me and need to catch up on several hours of theatre time in the short time remaining before the big night, I want to suggest ten videos to add to your viewing experience.

 

Yes TEN more videos. But, before you even think (probably too late already) that I must be some sort of nut case, you might be encouraged to keep reading when I tell you that you can watch all ten videos in less time than it takes to watch two of the nominated films.

 

These TED talks by authors are as riveting as the nominated films, at least to those of us who adore "the word." There is only one over 20  

Four are under 15 minutes.

 

Yes these are videos not text. But they are "original sources" as they come directly from the minds of authors. It's a college course in just a couple of hours. 

 

There won't be a test, but my guess is that the first video by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie is a good place to start. Absolutely one of the best 19 minutes of my professional career. 

 

Okay, I said that there would not be a test. But, I do have one question. If these ten talks were only available in text format, would you have bothered to read them all?

 

 

 ~ www.GoogleLitTrips.org ~

Brought to you by GLT Global ED dba Google Lit Trips, an educational nonprofit

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by GoogleLitTrips Reading List
Scoop.it!

25 Christmas presents for booklovers | Scottish Book Trust

25 Christmas presents for booklovers | Scottish Book Trust | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it

Christmas? Hanukkah? Three Birthdays? Anniversary? They're all coming up in the last two weeks of December around my house.

 

Even if you're "only celebrating Christmas" here are some totally great literary presents booklovers will love you for!

GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:

19 December 2014

 

I always love checking out these sites. 

 

How cool would a teacher be wearing gift #19?

 

I so wish gift #12 had crossed my path...so many times in the past! 

 

One of my all time favorite gifts was the Huck Finn version of gift #23 that my daughter and son-in-law gave me a couple of years ago.

 

And what's really cool is each of the 25 suggestions links to a different site bursting with other literary gift ideas.

 

 ~ www.GoogleLitTrips.org ~

brought to you by GLT Global ED, an educational nonprofit.

 

Like what we're doing? You can support us for less than the tip you'd leave at lunch today.  http://ebay.to/11vhysK

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by GoogleLitTrips Reading List
Scoop.it!

What Books Do for the Human Soul: The Four Psychological Functions of Great Literature

What Books Do for the Human Soul: The Four Psychological Functions of Great Literature | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
"Writers open our hearts and minds, and give us maps to our own selves."

The question of what reading does for the human soul is an etern
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:

19 December 2014

 

Love Literature? You'll LOVE this. The video is great. So many memorable phrases capturing the essence of the value of literature. 

 

A couple of favorites...

"It looks like it’s wasting time, but literature is actually the ultimate time-saver — because it gives us access to a range of emotions and events that it would take you years, decades, millennia to try to experience directly."

 

"...they (writers) make us sympathetic to ideas and feelings that are of deep importance but can’t afford airtime in a commercialized, status-conscious, and cynical world."

 

"In the best books, it’s as if the writer knows us better than we know ourselves — they find the words to describe the fragile, weird, special experiences of our inner lives… Writers open our hearts and minds, and give us maps to our own selves,..."

 

 ~ www.GoogleLitTrips.org ~

brought to you by GLT Global ED an educational nonprofit

 

Like what we're doing? You can support us for less than the tip you'd leave at lunch today.  http://ebay.to/11vhysK

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by GoogleLitTrips Reading List
Scoop.it!

The Librarians - And the Crown of King Arthur - TNT Drama

The Librarians - And the Crown of King Arthur - TNT Drama | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
Someone is killing off potential Librarians and it's up to Flynn Carsen and his new Guardian, Colonel Eve Baird, to save the three that are left.
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:

13 December 2014

_____

Please consider favoriting our efforts at:http://ebay.to/11vhysK

And, if so motivated, while you're at it, you are also quite welcome to support our efforts with a tax-deductible donation of as little as $5.00.

_____

 

Oh I LOVE this! Imagine a cross between Raiders of the Lost Ark, The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen and your love of Libraries and Librarians all wrapped up in a brand new TV series.

 

Yes! It's THE LIBRARIANS who will save the world

!

I just caught Season 1 Episode 1 on the TNT Drama / TBS website (http://www.tntdrama.com/shows/the-librarians.html

 

The first two episodes are available to watch. And, it appears as though there are 10 episodes in the series.

 

Within the first 10 minutes I had to hit the pause button on my computer, turn on the TV and set my DVR to automatically record the entire season.

 

It's campy. It's fun. It is poetic license gone wild. And, it is so full of literary allusion that I had to stop counting the literary references I recognized.

 

It may not be as exciting to the absolute purist, but if you have a bit of receptiveness to the concept, it would be worth your while to catch the first episode or two. 

 

Here's what I'm hoping. You know those "crazy" people who adore "anything Star Trek and Star Wars" so much that they can identify any of thousands quotes from these shows. You know, those who can spot, argue, and provide extensive analysis of even the tiniest minutiae? 

I can see that kind of fan base growing for this brand new show. It just drips with literary love.

 

That's where I'm heading. 

 

Any place for recommending this show to your students?

 

 

 ~ http://www.GoogleLitTrips.org ~

brought to you by GLT Global ED, an educational nonprofit.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by GoogleLitTrips Reading List
Scoop.it!

17 Writers On The Importance Of Reading

17 Writers On The Importance Of Reading | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
"Never trust anyone who has not brought a book with them." —Lemony Snicket
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:

7 November 2014

 

Oh what a delicious collection of quotes delivered to the mind's table with exquisite presentation.

 

These quotes are large enough to download and share with students. 

 

OR... to have students peruse in search of the single quote that most appeals to them.

 

A tip... tell the kids they can only pick ONE to call their favorite. Why? because it's easy to toss those without appeal. But extremely difficult to toss those with tremendous appeal. 

 

Just tell them the rules are they can ONLY pick one. Why? Because when forced to choose between two quotes (or maybe even three) they are forced into a sort of contemplative mode where they really have to weigh the reasons why both (or each) has such a strong appeal. 

 

And, in doing so, they will leave with an enhanced appreciation for all of the best ones. Rather than merely crossing out all but one and then not really exploring the source of any of the quote's attraction for them.

 

 ~ www.GoogleLitTrips.org ~

brought to you by GLT Global ED an educational nonprofit.

"We appreciate your tax-deductible donations!"

more...
Chéri Vausé's curator insight, November 10, 2014 6:08 PM

Reading is essential to writers, and not just for doing research. You can become hackneyed, in a rut, write in directionless formulas if you don't keep up and read someone else's style of prose. Authors, therefore, should read more than readers. Yes, that is exactly what I said. You will never grow as a writer if you don't read. As for reading junk, keep it to a minimum, for that could also keep you from reaching higher with your prose, from challenging you to writer better and better.

Scooped by GoogleLitTrips Reading List
Scoop.it!

A Small Dog’s Big Life by Irene Kelly UPDATED!

A Small Dog’s Big Life by Irene Kelly UPDATED! | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it

A Small Dog's Big Life by Irene Kelly added to list of refreshed Lit Trips in preparation for the launch of our updated website.

GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:

GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:

1 November 2014

 

A Small Dog's Big Life by Irene Kelly added to list of refreshed Lit Trips in preparation for the launch of our updated website.

 

Google Lit Trips fans using any of the following Lit Trip titles can upgrade now. All previous versions will become obsolete once the new Google Lit Trips website is launched sometime in the next few months.

 

A Small Dog's Big Life by Irene Kelly

The Slave Dancer v5 by Paula Fox

The Kite Runner v6 by Khaled Hosseini

The Grapes of Wrath v7 by John Steinbeck

Flotsam v3 by David Wiesner

Sam Patch Daredevil Jumper v4 by Julie Cummins

Going Home v3 by Margaret Wild

A Walk in London v4 by Salvatore Rubbino

A Family Apart v5 by Joan Lowery Nixon

Abuela v3 by Arthur Dorros

Big Anthony: His Story v4 by Tomie DePaola

Make Way for Ducklings v4 by Robert McCloskey

Number the Stars v4 by Lois Lowry

By the Great Hornspoon v4 by Sid Fleishman

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by GoogleLitTrips Reading List
Scoop.it!

The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck UPDATED

The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck UPDATED | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it

Another classic Google Lit Trip updated in preparation for the new COMING-SOMETIME-SOON completely updated and redesigned website.

GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:

11 October 2014

__________

IMPORTANT INFO FOR THOSE USING GOOGLE LIT TRIPS

We're updating almost all existing Lit Trips in preparation for the launch of our redesigned website. As each update is completed it is being posted on the current website. Both the current versions and the updated versions will work. However, previous media in previous versions may not continue to work well once the transition is made to the new website.

__________

 We've just updated the Lit Trip for The Grapes of Wrath. Lots of new media, updated, discussion starters, and supplementary weblinks.  The following Lit Trips have already been updated for the new website ready and are now available on existing website: 

The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck

Flotsam by David Wiesner

Sam Patch Daredevil  Jumper by Julie Cummins

Going Home by Margaret Wild

A Walk in London by Salvatore Rubbino

A Family Apart by Joan Lowery Nixon

Abuela by Arthur Dorros

Big Anthony: His Story by Tomie DePaola

Make Way for Ducklings by Robert McCloskey

Number the Stars by Lois Lowry

By the Great Hornspoon by Sid Fleishman


 ~ www.GoogleLitTrips.org ~

brought to you by GLT Global ED a tax-exempt educational nonprofit

more...
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's curator insight, October 11, 2014 2:56 PM

11 October 2014

__________

IMPORTANT INFO FOR THOSE USING GOOGLE LIT TRIPS

We're updating almost all existing Lit Trips in preparation for the launch of our redesigned website. As each update is completed it is being posted on the current website. Both the current versions and the updated versions will work. However, previous media in previous versions may not continue to work well once the transition is made to the new website.

__________

 

 We've just updated the Lit Trip for The Grapes of Wrath. Lots of new media, updated, discussion starters, and supplementary weblinks.  The following Lit Trips have already been updated for the new website ready and are now available on existing website:

The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck

Flotsam by David WiesnerSam Patch Daredevil  Jumper by Julie Cummins

Going Home by Margaret Wild

A Walk in London by Salvatore Rubbino

Family Apart by Joan Lowery Nixon

Abuela by Arthur Dorros

Big Anthony: His Story by Tomie DePaola

Make Way for Ducklings by Robert McCloskey

Number the Stars by Lois Lowry

By the Great Hornspoon by Sid Fleishman


 ~ www.GoogleLitTrips.org ~

brought to you by GLT Global ED a tax-exempt educational nonprofit

Scooped by GoogleLitTrips Reading List
Scoop.it!

Big Changes Coming to Google Lit Trips!

Big Changes Coming to Google Lit Trips! | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it

Very Important Information for ALL Google Lit Trips Users!

GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:

20 September 2014

 The good news that I can share is that a completely redesigned and updated website is under development. The anticipated transition date is still undetermined.

 

In preparation for the transition to the new site, we will be revising ALL existing Google Lit Trips over the next several weeks to reflect changes we are making in our media storage location. We will be posting those revisions on the existing site as they are completed so that those using these titles can update to the new versions as soon as they are available.

 

It is IMPORTANT to know that the media in previous versions of existing Google Lit Trips may cease to work properly once the new site is published.

 

You can check the existing website to see an updated list of the new versions as they are published.

 

 ~ www.GoogleLitTrips.org ~

GLT Global ED aka Google Lit Trips, an educational nonprofit

more...
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's curator insight, September 20, 2014 5:03 PM

20 September 2014

 The good news that I can share is that a completely redesigned and updated website is under development. The anticipated transition date is still undetermined.

 

In preparation for the transition to the new site, we will be revising ALL existing Google Lit Trips over the next several weeks to reflect changes we are making in our media storage location. We will be posting those revisions on the existing site as they are completed so that those using these titles can update to the new versions as soon as they are available.

 

It is IMPORTANT to know that the media in previous versions of existing Google Lit Trips may cease to work properly once the new site is published.

 

You can check the existing website to see an updated list of the new versions as they are published.

 

 ~ www.GoogleLitTrips.org ~

GLT Global ED aka Google Lit Trips, an educational nonprofit

Scooped by GoogleLitTrips Reading List
Scoop.it!

Why a good book is a secret door

Why a good book is a secret door | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
Childhood is surreal. Why shouldn't children's books be? In this whimsical talk, award-winning author Mac Barnett speaks about writing that escapes the page, art as a doorway to wonder -- and what real kids say to a fictional whale.
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:

20 September 2014

 

______

NOTE: IF YOU FIND THIS TED TALK INTERESTING, SEE OUR OTHER SCOOP-IT ENTRY FOR TODAY,  "WHY ARE FAIRY TALES UNIVERSALLY APPEALING?"

_____

One of the difficulties in teaching literary reading these days...well, make that..."teaching literary reading has always been," is defending its value in "the real world."  

 

Whether one is defending literary reading in terms of its value in preparing for college and career, or defending the belief that learning the value of contemplating the great questions of life is as important, or sometimes even more important than learning the skill of calculating a correct answer, or defending the belief that the "lies" of great fiction is much like defending the value of the  candy coating on children's medicine; enticing readers to swallow the otherwise often bitter pill of of some of life's most important truths whether they be the big bad wolves that inhabit the forest or the big bad wolves of Wall Street, fiction's value is that it provides a palatable mode of engaging us in the contemplation of some of life's bitter truths while offering hope that life's sweetest truths have a chance IF WE TAKE OUR MEDICINE seriously.

 

In TRUTH, FICTION is always about the tensions between good and evil. We connect and through the magic of suspension of disbelief, we want to know how it turns out, whether the good or the bad win. In the process of caring about fiction we both consciously and unconsciously  absorb deeper understandings of why the bad do what they do, why what they do is bad, and what the good  do or do not do to prevent or repair the damage done by the bad.

 

We can learn from FICTION because it mirrors TRUTH by engaging us via humor, excitement, fear, and a wide variety of techniques that we welcome and thereby like the candy-coated medicine, we take that medicine eagerly because we learn to care about what TRULY good people have always cared about.

 

 ~ www.GoogleLitTrips.com ~

brought to you by GLT Global ED aka Google Lit Trips, an educational nonprofit

 

 

more...
Luisa Cuesta's curator insight, September 20, 2014 2:00 PM

Una fantástica forma de ver la literatura para niños. Además de ser bastante cómico!

Scooped by GoogleLitTrips Reading List
Scoop.it!

Google Lit Trips: Books Come Alive | Sweet Integrations

Google Lit Trips: Books Come Alive | Sweet Integrations | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
Make your books come alive with Google Lit Trips. Your students will love visiting all the locations mentioned in your book.
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:
17 June 2016

I am so happy to have decided to spend my retirement after nearly 40 years teaching, by supporting educators, teachers, and students from around the world.

Articles such as this truly warm my heart.

brought to you by GLT Global ED dba Google Lit Trips, an educational nonprofit
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by GoogleLitTrips Reading List from Reading About Reading
Scoop.it!

Students as Explorers: Using Google Earth with Literature

Students as Explorers: Using Google Earth with Literature | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
How to use Google Earth to make literature relevant for students.
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:
3 March 2016

Happy to announce the publication of my blog post for  Education Week at the invitation Heather Singmaster of the Asia Society.

Register at http://www.googlelittrips.org for quick and easy access to our library of Google Lit Trips.

Reminder, Google Lit Trips resources are free.
However, you are always welcome to  to support our efforts and express your appreciation with a paypal donation. 

Short paypal URL: https://goo.gl/XtUvrc

brought to you by GLT Global ED an educational nonprofit also known as Google Lit Trips.
more...
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's curator insight, March 3, 3:20 PM
3 March 2016

Happy to announce the publication of my blog post for  Education Week at the invitation Heather Singmaster of the Asia Society.

Register at http://www.googlelittrips.org for quick and easy access to our library of Google Lit Trips.

Reminder, Google Lit Trips resources are free.
However, you are always welcome to  to support our efforts and express your appreciation with a paypal donation. 

Short paypal URL: https://goo.gl/XtUvrc

brought to you by GLT Global ED an educational nonprofit also known as Google Lit Trips.
Tannis Niziol's curator insight, March 14, 4:22 PM
3 March 2016
 
Happy to announce the publication of my blog post for  Education Week at the invitation Heather Singmaster of the Asia Society.
 
Register at http://www.googlelittrips.org for quick and easy access to our library of Google Lit Trips.
 
Reminder, Google Lit Trips resources are free.
However, you are always welcome to  to support our efforts and express your appreciation with a paypal donation. 
 
Short paypal URL: https://goo.gl/XtUvrc
 
brought to you by GLT Global ED an educational nonprofit also known as Google Lit Trips.
Lynnette Van Dyke's curator insight, March 26, 7:14 AM
3 March 2016

Happy to announce the publication of my blog post for  Education Week at the invitation Heather Singmaster of the Asia Society.

Register at http://www.googlelittrips.org for quick and easy access to our library of Google Lit Trips.

Reminder, Google Lit Trips resources are free.
However, you are always welcome to  to support our efforts and express your appreciation with a paypal donation. 

Short paypal URL: https://goo.gl/XtUvrc

brought to you by GLT Global ED an educational nonprofit also known as Google Lit Trips.
Scooped by GoogleLitTrips Reading List
Scoop.it!

13 Literary and Book Related Prints and Posters

13 Literary and Book Related Prints and Posters | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
Bookish, Literary, and Book Related Prints and Posters for decoration your house, office, library, and walls.
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:

25 January 2015

 

I enjoy discovering the sites that provide unique ways to promote a love of reading publicly, whether it is on the walls of a classroom, a library, a young person's bedroom, a family's home, in our wardrobe...anywhere we can proclaim a love of reading publicly.

 

There are many pro-reading posters in this collection however, I must admit that the one featured above spoke to me in ways that the others only did at lesser levels.

 

Unlike others that felt a bit too much like adults trying to tell kids what to think is cool, this one "tells a story" that reminds this viewer, at least, that THESE are the REAL REASONS why reading is a good thing.

 

It reminds us that reading is about being an enjoyable way to engage in the discovery of ideas worth thinking about; thinking about what it means to be a caring or uncaring person. Reading provides an enjoyable way of expanding our receptiveness to revisiting our current understandings of what it means to be a humane being. 

 

In some way, the poster captures for me the magic of the overlapping space in the Venn Diagram of Plot and Theme; that sweet spot where the focus on both is perfect for effective teaching of reading and literature. 

 

I've seen teachers who make faces that silently convey the same repulsion that people's faces make when they have smelled something terrible nearby, when they are actually unhappy with a student's excessive interest in books that appear to be heavy on plot but vapid in theme.

 

And, I've seen students who make the same faces when they feel that a teacher is way too focused on "ruining the story" with excessive analysis of structure and theme in books that have plots for which the student has not yet discovered any way to find any interest at all.

 

In the poster above, we see engaged readers. Period. We are not told by what means these particular readers became engaged readers. It may well be because they have been fortunate to have had parents, teachers, librarians, and/or friends who planted and cultivated the seeds of life-long reading spectacularly. But, the poster's first impression for me is its focus on the rewards of engaged reading.

 

We don't know if the comments were stimulated by an unexpected plot turn or by the contemplation of the motives behind that plot turn. What we do know is there are actively engaged minds in every one the the readers. And that's a good thing.

 

So... let me engage in a bit of excessive thematic and structural analysis.

_____

NOTE: Each poster is linked to a web site where the poster is for sale. I mention this not to encourage you to consider purchasing one of the posters, but rather to point out that you will there be able to see a larger version of the poster. In fact, when you get there, click again on the poster for an even larger view.

_____

 

RE: THE TEXT

"What!": I love the punctuation. A question mark might suggest confusion and a lack of understanding of what just happened while the exclamation mark suggests to me that the reader is fully aware of what just happened and is having both an emotional and intellectual moment of contemplative outrage at what just happened.

 

"Hmm...": Another punctuation observation. I love the ellipsis. "Hmmm" is often used to suggest something like, "Hmm, I just want you to know that I heard you, but do not wish to encourage you to think that I agree with you." Or, it is often used to suggest something like, "Hmm, I hadn't thought about it that way before. I'll have to give that some thought." It is the ellipsis that encourages me to wonder what that readers' take on the particular scene actually was. 

 

"Oh!": I've read so much about the exclamation point being considered by so many to be a crutch for weak writers. The advice against using the exclamation mark generally runs along the lines of suggesting that if a writer has to tell the reader to find the writing shocking then the writing itself is weak. There are occasions where I find this advise true and there are occasions when I find this advise well-intended, but over-reaching and stifling to learners. In this case, remembering that the engagement between individual readers and individual stories is very personal, some readers might be shocked by a particular passage while others might said, "Of course. Who didn't see that coming?" The exclamation point in this poster tells me that this is a reader in the midst of total personal immersion and that she has come across something startling TO HER. These are the moments in any story where we are emotionally and/or intellectually startled by the unexpected. And, the unexpected is frequently the point at which our contemplation of the underlying themes might be "peeking" out between the lines.

 

RE: THE IMAGERY...

Body Language: There may be a parent, teacher, librarian or friend nearby, but if so they have been cropped out of the poster. The focus is on the reader's engagement and we know these readers somehow managed to reach the age they have reached and have not, as too many of our students have, abandoned a personal interest in reading.

 

The reader in the upper left corner is reading in the "default preferred" mode. She is sitting up straight and appears to be engaged and "properly attentive." Fine. If that is a way to read and discover the wonders of reading for her. Great. And, by the way, it may be important to note that she may not be simply representing the "traditional" posture of expected reading body language. She also appears to be representing the faction of readers who are perfectly okay with reading on digital devices.

 

The reader in the upper right corner who may be sitting on the floor, or in a bed, or near a campfire, or....., is obviously engaged. I don't know what she is reading, or why she is reading, but I do know she's intensely engaged.The subtlety of her leaning forward and of her fingers to her lips are indications of a sincere engaged attentiveness. 

 

Several of the readers are in positions not universally recognized as being beneficial to attentive reading. Yet each seems to give "some" clear visual indications of being attentively engaged.

JUST SOME ELEMENTS THAT I FOUND WORTH CONTEMPLATING

The standing reader is reading a newspaper. Why is she standing? Maybe she's on the subway, waiting for a bus, or a table at a table with a line out the door. Who knows, but if so, she's choosing to use that time to read.  

 

The reader in the lower right corner is listening to her iPhone. I remember when the default expectation was to not be listening to music while I was reading. Though I always liked reading, I remember an entire collections of surreptitious (read serious guilt causing) ways I'd discovered to disguise the fact that I had music playing while I did my reading homework. 

 

It wasn't until I was in college that I discovered that I had been essentially using music as a sort of white noise, drowning out the conversations leaking into my reading space from other rooms, or the sounds of kids who were still outside playing loudly, or the burping refrigerator noises, and TV sounds distracting me while I tried to concentrate on doing my homework reading. I did come to understand that music without lyrics made for more effective white noise isolation than music with lyrics. By the way, did you notice that the girl with the earbuds happens to be reading sheet music? Now that just might be a deeper engagement in reading if you ask me.

 

BUT what about the reader who is smoking? I'm kind of hoping her "OH!" exclamation is indicating that she's reading an article about the the dangers of smoking that was somehow able to cut past her inherent resistance to being receptive to revisiting her primary focus upon a perception that smoking is a sign of being cool.

 

Who knows?

 

But one thing is for sure, the poster has done a great job of engaging my interest in keeping an open mind about effective reading and literary analysis education.

 

 ~ www.GoogleLitTrips.org ~

brought to you by GLT Global ED, an educational nonprofit

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by GoogleLitTrips Reading List
Scoop.it!

Ebooks: a more civilised way of scribbling in the margins?

Ebooks: a more civilised way of scribbling in the margins? | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
E-readers are reinventing the ways books are read and annotated, writes James Bridle
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:

24 January 2015


In the ongoing squabble between paper-based and digital reading, my position has long been that as long as they read, get out of their way. The consequences of having a society of significant numbers of readers who don't deserves much more of our attention. I realize that even this opinion is fraught with opportunities for counter-argument. Some other time for that.


In spite of the fact that just this week I've read multiple conflicting articles reporting "research" proclaiming that either paper or digital reading "has now been proven" to be ineffective or demonstrably more effective than the other, I do have a clear preference for my iPad's annotation resources. 

 

Again, I know the challenges to the benefits of  annotation and marginalia in SCHOOL OWNED resources. But, we also know the challenges involved in getting students to take and then use external notes. Some do it well; many do not and rather than appreciating the potential value in taking external notes  "if they'd only do it,", they often perceive the tediousness and /or difficulty of taking notes into a blanket cause for not liking reading. 

 

A couple of years ago, I was asked by a friend to make a short video he could show teachers who were just about to begin a school-wide transition to integrating iPads into their lesson planning. 

 

I mention that the video was made a couple of years ago because ebooks (and pedagogies) have evolved since the video was made and are even more versatile today than they were at the time.   

 

I decided to focus upon the benefits of ebooks for note taking and marginalia in order for teachers to create their own "teacher's copy" of a book. Teachers have always had permission to highlight and write marginal notes in paper-based books, but I was interested in proving the extra benefits of doing so in ebooks. 

 

You can view that video here: http://vimeo.com/70404496


I should point out that I purposely did not go deep into all of the advantages of iBook notation possibilities, not wanting to overwhelm those who would be viewing the video with a certain pre-existing anxiety over the learning curve for the iPad transition learning curve (and because what I did cover is already a couple of minutes longer than the requested length). Also, note that my reference to being able to email notes is slightly inaccurate. The entire collection of highlights and notes can not be emailed all at once. Clicking on a particular note will go to the specific page where highlighted passage can be selected and then emailed, texted, tweeted, or sent to Facebook.

 

We who teach know that an annotated teacher's copy of a book we're teaching is far more useful to us than a collection of externally maintained notes. The difference is proximity. Our notes are precisely where we need them to be at precisely the moment we need them.

 

In a sense, the rules against writing in paper-based books are similar to the rules that led many of us to believe that the proper way to punctuate book titles WAS to underline them. That was actually never the "really correct way." The proper way to punctuate book titles had been to put them in italic. The underline rule was a requirement by typing technologies which until computers could not do what typesetting technologies had long been able to do. 

 

Similarly, the don't write in the book rule is a requirement of school funding limitations not of book publishing standards for correct use of books.

 

Finally, do you remember reading The Velveteen Rabbit? If so, at the end of the story, do you remember how we could tell that the Velveteen Rabbit had been loved?

 

If you get my point and haven't read Chris Van Allsburg's Bad Day at Riverbend (yes, I recognize the irony of the fact that the free version of Scoop-it does not allow for proper title formatting) then you should check it out. It's a "pre-loved" book even when it's brand new!

 

Don't get me wrong. I do have a modest collection of autographed books that will otherwise remain in pristine condition as long as I own them.


AFTERWORD

A few thoughts regarding situations where students need to do academic reading of literature without being able to highlight and create marginal notes, and thereby find themselves running the obstacle course and too frequently counterproductive effort required  by taking, managing, and studying from external notes.

 

1. Tell them that if they really like highlighting and writing in margins, they are always allowed to "lose" their book. If it means much to them all they need to do is replace the lost book. 

 

2. Don't make them take external notes! I used to keep packets of the smallest post-its available. They are about an inch and a half square. I'd tell the kids who seemed to not be successful with note-taking to try an experiment. Just jot quick notes on post-its and stick them right on the page where the note is appropriate with just a tiny edge of the non-sticky side hanging over the page edge. Then at least the note and the reason for the note are always in the same place. All I needed was for them to remove the post-its before returning the book. This evolved into kids discovering that they could buy these small post-its in packets with multiple pads of different colors, and thereby they could even color-code their notes. For example, Different colored post-its  make it incredibly easy to visually identify notes relating to different themes being tracked while reading. 

 

 ~ www.GoogleLitTrips.org ~

brought to you by GLT Global ED an educational nonprofit

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by GoogleLitTrips Reading List
Scoop.it!

Marching for Freedom by Elizabeth Partridge

Marching for Freedom by Elizabeth Partridge | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:

18 January 2014
FEATURED LIT TRIP
Marching for Freedom: Walk Together Children and Don't You Grow Weary by Elizabeth Partridge, tells the story of how ordinary kids helped change history. Award-winning author Elizabeth Partridge explores the events at Selma from their point of view, drawing on the vivid recollections of some of those who marched as children.

This was the first Google Lit Trip developed in collaboration with the book’s author. Partridge “appears” in the Lit Trip via special placemarks where she inserts bits of “the stories behind the stories” where she shares some of her insights garnered while researching and writing the story.
 _____
The movie Selma, though controversial, has brought an important historical event back into public discourse. We are proud to include this Google Lit Trip as another look at the events of that march.

 

Can we look at the images of Bloody Sunday so long ago and the headlines today and ignore the unfinished business at hand?

 

Need a reminder? This page gives a brief story about Unarmed people of color killed by police between 1999-2014. How many would you guess were killed in 2014 alone?

 

Count 'em then ask whether the story of the events of Selma deserve a place in your informational reading planning.

 

(http://gawker.com/unarmed-people-of-color-killed-by-police-1999-2014-1666672349)  

 

  ~ www.GoogleLitTrips.org ~

 brought to you by GLT Global ED  dba Google Lit Trips an educational nonprofit.

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by GoogleLitTrips Reading List
Scoop.it!

51 Of The Most Beautiful Sentences In Literature

51 Of The Most Beautiful Sentences In Literature | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it

. “She was becoming herself and daily casting aside that fictitious self which we assume like a garment with which to appear before the world.”
—Kate Chopin, “The Awakening”

GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:

19 December 2014

 

What's your favorite sentence (anywhere)?

 

Kids quote a lot! Maybe from literature; maybe not. But, they love individual sentences that somehow stick in their minds. And, they use those special sentences repeatedly as a means of expressing "something" that someone else expressed so well in their perception.

 

Where do these sentences come from? A favorite movie, TV character, bumpersticker, poem, song lyric, book, celebrity, teacher, ....

 

Who knows, but wherever a kid is touched by a single sentence, there is a magic worth paying attention to.

 

What if kids were asked to find and document the source for a single sentence that has captured their interest in ways that no other single sentence has captured them?

 

Don't judge the source. Don't judge the kid. Just listen to the honesty even if that honest is actually between the words they share.

 

I'd give it a try just to see what happens.

 

 ~ www.GoogleLitTrips.org ~

brought to you by GLT Global ED, an educational nonprofit

 

Like what we're doing? You can support us for less than the tip you'd leave at lunch today.  http://ebay.to/11vhysK

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by GoogleLitTrips Reading List
Scoop.it!

Support Google Lit Trips for as little as $5... and it's tax-deductible too!

Support Google Lit Trips for as little as $5... and it's tax-deductible too! | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:

We are 100% volunteer and have delivered over 25,000 Lit Trips supporting reading, literacy, and literature students and educators from more than 140 countries JUST THIS YEAR.

 

It's just two clicks away. http://ebay.to/11vhysK

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by GoogleLitTrips Reading List
Scoop.it!

Pedro’s Journal by Pam Conrad UPDATED!

Pedro’s Journal by Pam Conrad UPDATED! | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it

Pedro's Journal by Pam Conrad added to list of refreshed Lit Trips in preparation for the launch of our updated website.

 

GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:

22 November 2014

 

Pedro's Journal by Pam Conrad added to list of refreshed Lit Trips in preparation for the launch of our updated website.

 

Google Lit Trips fans using any of the following Lit Trip titles can upgrade now. All previous versions will become obsolete once the new Google Lit Trips website is launched sometime in the next few months.

 

Pedro's Journal v3 by Pam Conrad

Brothers in Hope: The Story of the Lost Boys of Sudan v4 by Lois Lowry

Number the Stars v5 by Lois Lowry

We All Went on Safari by Laurie Krebs

Esperanza Rising by Pam Muñoz Ryan

Fever 1798 v2 by Laurie Halse Anderson

A Small Dog's Big Life v2 by Irene Kelly

Night by Elie Wiesel

The Slave Dancer v5 by Paula Fox

The Kite Runner v6 by Khaled Hosseini

The Grapes of Wrath v7 by John Steinbeck

Flotsam v3 by David Wiesner

Sam Patch Daredevil Jumper v4 by Julie Cummins

Going Home v3 by Margaret Wild

A Walk in London v4 by Salvatore Rubbino

A Family Apart v5 by Joan Lowery Nixon

Abuela v3 by Arthur Dorros

Big Anthony: His Story v4 by Tomie DePaola

Make Way for Ducklings v4 by Robert McCloskey

Number the Stars v4 by Lois Lowry

By the Great Hornspoon v4 by Sid Fleishman

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by GoogleLitTrips Reading List
Scoop.it!

Esperanza Rising by Pam Muñoz Ryan UPDATED!

Esperanza Rising by Pam Muñoz Ryan UPDATED! | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it

Esperanza Rising by Pam Muñoz Ryan added to list of refreshed Lit Trips in preparation for the launch of our updated website.

more...
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's curator insight, November 3, 2014 6:22 PM

3 November 2014

 

Esperanza Rising by Pam Muñoz Ryan added to list of refreshed Lit Trips in preparation for the launch of our updated website.

 

Google Lit Trips fans using any of the following Lit Trip titles can upgrade now. All previous versions will become obsolete once the new Google Lit Trips website is launched sometime in the next few months.

 

Esperanza Rising v2 by Pam Muñoz Ryan

A Small Dog's Big Life v2 by Irene Kelly

The Slave Dancer v5 by Paula Fox

The Kite Runner v6 by Khaled Hosseini

The Grapes of Wrath v7 by John Steinbeck

Flotsam v3 by David Wiesner

Sam Patch Daredevil Jumper v4 by Julie Cummins

Going Home v3 by Margaret Wild

A Walk in London v4 by Salvatore Rubbino

A Family Apart v5 by Joan Lowery Nixon

Abuela v3 by Arthur Dorros

Big Anthony: His Story v4 by Tomie DePaola

Make Way for Ducklings v4 by Robert McCloskey

Number the Stars v4 by Lois Lowry

By the Great Hornspoon v4 by Sid Fleishman

 

 ~ www.GoogleLitTrips.org ~

brought to you by GLT Global ED an educational nonprofit

Scooped by GoogleLitTrips Reading List
Scoop.it!

Gotta love it!

Gotta love it! | Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Scoop.it
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:

24 October 2014

 

In a hamburger joint across the street from AT&T Park. My new favorite beer (bottle cap)!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by GoogleLitTrips Reading List
Scoop.it!

What is Literature for? - THE BIG IDEAS - YouTube

Why should we spend our time reading novels and poems when, out there, big things are going on? The School of Life explains why we should be reading - and ho...
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:

21 September 2014

 

I really don't know if high school students would be responsive or not to this. But, it's a very interesting defense of Literature as a valuable way to spend some time. 

 

And more importantly it emphasizes the real reason why we teach great literature. It is a great preparation for the REALLY important test.

 

No, not that one. 

 

Life itself is the really important test. 

 

My question..."Where else in the curriculum do we attend to these very important life lessons?"

 

 ~ www.GoogleLitTrips.org ~

brought to you by GLT Global ED aka Google Lit Trips an educational nonprofit

 

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by GoogleLitTrips Reading List
Scoop.it!

Why Are Fairy Tales Universally Appealing?

Stories are like that. Like cities, they are built on the stones and bones of the past....
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's insight:

20 September 2014

 

______

NOTE: IF YOU FIND THIS ARTICLE INTERESTING, SEE OUR OTHER SCOOP-IT ENTRY FOR TODAY,  "WHY A GOOD BOOK IS A SECRET DOOR."

_____

 The comments I wrote for our other scoop today are absolutely appropriate for this article as well. In a sense, both offer eloquent defenses for literary reading, for fiction being the art of using "lies" to reveal "truth."  

 

Rather than repeat comments made in our previous scoop, here are a few thought-provoking quotes from Kate Forsyth's piece focusing upon how and WHY fiction has a long history of updating and retelling age old stories.

 

_____" old stories made new can utterly change what we knew and understood about that story... and perhaps about ourselves as well."____

 

The ellipsis in the quote is the authors. And, it provides a poignant pause before delivering the real reason why we read the classics. The characters in all great stories represent ourselves. We read them to find ourselves, to learn more about ourselves and the nature of the world within which we exist. 

 

After a quick, poetically licensed review of the ancestry  of the Sleeping Beauty story, many of our students only know through Disney. she suggests that...

 

_____"Stories are like that. Like cities, they are built on the stones and bones of the past."

_____
Quite simply, like the umbilical cord, we are all connected to the previous generation who themselves are all connected to the generations that preceded them. And, it is that "string of connections" that is at the source of the potential for seeing our world more clearly by reading about the world(s), fictitious or otherwise, of those who told those variations of the same stories from the beginning of time.


Forsyth continues...

_____

"One of the things I was examining in my doctorate is why fairy tales such as "Sleeping Beauty" and "Rapunzel" continue to be told and retold, sometimes enduring for over a thousand years. Basically, what I discovered is a story only survives if it articulates some kind of desire or dilemma, some kind of predicament, which is of importance to both the reteller of the tale, and to his or her audience."

_____


Successful storytellers can not just tell stories of interest to themselves. They must appeal to what their audiences find important. 


As educators, we have already discovered the relevance and and importance of great literature. But, we can only assist our students in making those same discoveries for themselves.

 

We rarely find students who accept relevance and importance because we tell them a story is relevant and important. And, truthfully, I worry about students who do accept our word as truth without coming to understand for themselves  the truths we share with them. Those may well be the same people who grow up to be targeted victims of any snake-oil charlatan who "tells them to believe without question." 


Discovering a story's relevance, is a joyous experience in finding oneself in the story's revelations.  

 

So on that note, I guess I should stop telling you what to find in this article. There is much to discover, contemplate, and consider integrating into our own particular pedagogical practices.

 

   ~ www.GoogleLitTrips.org ~brought to you by GLT Global ED aka Google Lit Trips, an educational nonprofit

more...
No comment yet.