Good Pedagogy
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Good Pedagogy
Good teaching and learning pedagogy for WPL
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Optimal Video Length for Student Engagement: an issue of Conciseness vs. Length

Optimal Video Length for Student Engagement: an issue of Conciseness vs. Length | Good Pedagogy | Scoop.it
Andreas Kuswara's insight:

The data coming out from edX experience is intriguing, but there are a lot of facets in video preparation; so probably my original question in my mind “perfect duration for video eLearning content” was flawed. That data from edX findings indicated that the shorter video is (maxed out in 6 minutes duration) the more likely students stay watching the video (engagement?) until the end of the video; and anything longer than 6 minutes, students will only watch the first 6 minutes or less; hence wasted efforts.

 

Well first of all, it is a median value, so we don’t know if the actual data are homogenous or has large variance; I think the problem with what data we have is, we can't have identical video (since they already different length to begin with) to compare, both the long-video and short-video group are watching different videos; and the time factor here is inherently corresponds with risk of the video going bad. In layman term, it's probably relatively easier to make short good quality video, than to make long equally good quality video; even if we put aside the matter about the viewer perception, because the longer the video is, the more chance for the producer to make mistakes.

 

If that's the case, then a short video will have a tendency to consistently be perceived of having higher quality than longer video, although the quality is not necessarily the function of the length of the video per se. Thus it could be not accurate to say, if we want to make a better video, then make a short one; but instead it could be more accurate to say, if you want a higher chance to make better video, then make a short one so you have less time to screw up.

 

We might want to bring in another vocabulary at this point, which is probably the word "concise"; it's not the matter of the length, but then density of information within that length of video. That is what I suspect have a greater impact to engagement than the length per se. maybe name it Conciseness Index, and it’s like a measure of quality content per time duration. If we have two videos of significantly differing length, but consistently have the same conciseness index throughout the length, then see if they have different in-video drop out, if there is, then we can regard the length of the video as a contributing factor in itself to student engagement.

 

When students faced with bad or very bad short video, and they see that the video progress bar is already pass half-way mark and close to the end, they might think, well I’ll just sit tight until the end of this video, the video is playing but their mind is disengaged. Maybe, maybe not, we don’t know.

 

But my comment here is neither to defend nor to attack short or long video; which seems to be an interesting research project in itself; but taking the practical educator’s hat, we need to shift focus to the conciseness of our videos. We are making 6 minutes video, or 16 or 60 minutes video, good, how do we use every second in that video? Are we wasting the time? Ours to produce and students to watch? Have we made a good use of it?

 

Before we record our videos, either a full blown video production, or simply voice/video over presentation, have we prepare and make us of the time to have enough conciseness that does not over load the students, but also not putting them to sleep.

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Ontario Today | Getting an education on-line

Ontario Today | Getting an education on-line | Good Pedagogy | Scoop.it
Andreas Kuswara's insight:

This is a very useful talk, and great comments from the callers; to look at what MOOC is, so far.

 

Curious, if it's just connecting people, would not the community such as Google+ Communities work, people can join in and out any time, people can jump in and ask questions etc. so Google+ Community plus Google Drive where files can be pluck into can already become a MOOC. but then why the "C" is called a "course"? why not rename it Massive Open Online Community? we would miss the notion of an existance of "pedagogy". So.. maybe if we haven't really clear on the pedagogy, then it can't really be called as a "Course".

 

MOOC is an experiment i agree on that, what are we trying to improve? (at the end is to improve learning, i hope) the connection between peers? the access to materials? .. or something else.

 

It's almost like everyone have their "version" of MOOC concept; if anything, it could be an indicator on how frustrated people are with current education system. probably.

 

Excited to see when MOOC reaching maturity.

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Studying Learning in the Worldwide Classroom: Research into edX’s First MOOC | Journal of Research & Pra...

Research & Practice in Assessment is an online journal dedicated to the advancement of scholarly discussion between researchers and practitioners in the field of student learning outcomes assessment in higher education.

Via Peter Mellow
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Mooc credits vs Uni degree

Mooc credits vs Uni degree | Good Pedagogy | Scoop.it
Andreas Kuswara's insight:

a perspective (for now) from Coursera's Andrew Ng about their positionig of the MOOC credits in relation to the traditional university degree. 

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Looking at MOOCs from Gartner's Hype Cycle

Looking at MOOCs from Gartner's Hype Cycle | Good Pedagogy | Scoop.it
RT @e_trude: Great articel! Must read #mooc Why MOOCs are like Farmville http://t.co/n8GTN2gy via @zite #mmc13

Via Helen Farley
Andreas Kuswara's insight:

from birth, to its peak of inflated expectations, descending into the trough of disillusionment, and finally, -- we hope so -- reaching the slope of enlightment where we can get to the real innovation that MOOC can afford.

 

very enlighting reading.

 

I don't know what the story with Farmvile, or how the author draws paralel with it; but doesn't matter. still interesting reading.

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An insider's guide: what it's really like to study a MOOC

An insider's guide: what it's really like to study a MOOC | Good Pedagogy | Scoop.it
Anyone who has been paying attention to higher education this year will have heard of the MOOC – courses from prestigious universities offered for free online.There’s been great interest in them from…...
Andreas Kuswara's insight:

James Farrell gave his insight on MOOC from a first person's view: as a student. it raise a question in my mind, if MOOC is a disruptive innovation or - as James suggest - a distracting innovation, diverging us away from what we should be focusing on, education and pedagogies.

 

 

i think, more discussion should be done to discuss the pedagogical impact, or pedagogical approach to take advantage of the new affordances that MOOC mode delivery offers or emphazied on.

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What's Hot, What's Not 2013: Lev Gonick

Lev Gonick looks past the hype to examine version 1.0 of MOOCs and discusses how he would like to see the phenomenon evolve. (From Campus Technology January ...
Andreas Kuswara's insight:

interesting points, some MOOCs, although well intended, but miss the "open"-ness and simply another disorganized e-learning or simply an open collaboration. is the absent of a structure/rigid curriculum automatically becomes open learning? 

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Learning as Performance: MOOC Pedagogy and On-ground Classes

Learning as Performance: MOOC Pedagogy and On-ground Classes | Good Pedagogy | Scoop.it
Hybrid Pedagogy is an academic and networked journal of teaching and technology that combines the strands of critical and digital pedagogy to arrive at the best social and civil uses of technology and digital media in education.
Andreas Kuswara's insight:

is MOOC a pedagogy?

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Community Colleges Try MOOCs in Blended Courses

Community Colleges Try MOOCs in Blended Courses | Good Pedagogy | Scoop.it
Two community colleges in Massachusetts will be trying out a blended model of instruction that integrates online content from edX.

It would be interesting to see how the various business model being trialled with the MOOC.
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Reviewing Christensen’s Disruptive Technologies in MOOC Terms

an interesting short article looking on why MOOCs is considered disruptive from the point of view of Christensen’s book "Disruptive Technologies" (Harvard Business Review, 1995) .

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The other “M” in the future of higher and distance education

The other “M” in the future of higher and distance education | Good Pedagogy | Scoop.it

Problematizing MOOCification of higher education & Management of higher education institutions

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A University's Offer of Credit for a MOOC Gets No Takers

A University's Offer of Credit for a MOOC Gets No Takers | Good Pedagogy | Scoop.it
Colorado State University-Global Campus made the $89 offer but may have to adjust its thinking, officials say.
Andreas Kuswara's insight:

Curious if university have explored MOOC as a subscription model rather than a one fix-period (semester or whatever) model.

 

subscription gives access, a fix rate subscription to the university's MOOC could be interesting, giving students access to a set of courses, not just one.

 

the credit earned when students completed a set of learning activities, carefully designed and crafted to make use a pre-defined content, and at-time conversation with some form of assessment; 

 

it's almost like turning the university's semester-based education model into a fitness center's subscription model. when you complete a DIY challange, you earn a credit for recognized qualification in a course.

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MOOCs are really a platform

MOOCs are really a platform | Good Pedagogy | Scoop.it
Andreas Kuswara's insight:

cMOOC (connectivist MOOC / the real MOOC) and xMOOC (not-connectivist MOOC) ... the author argue about the two, then make a point that MOOC is just a platform. I tend to agree about MOOC is just a platform, unless a strict and clear definition given and kept by anyone using the label MOOC.

 

If the M = "massively" is simply means the amount of user that can access the material is massive, then any online learning course can be 'massive' as long as you open the gate and allow people in. no need to implement new pedagogy or anything there. then what's "open"? if it only means that people can freely go in and out with no pay, then ofcourse that "open" cause "massive" and thus both the M and O practically become meaningless.

 

I'm curious to see the MOOC where the M and O have a more significant meaning and differentiator. Doesn't mean that the so called "xMOOC" has no place in the education landscape, they probably do, infact i think they definitly do. but mixing the two is under one banner is not helping the discussion.

 

maybe the real MOOC should go on and re-brand itself with a less ambigious words acronym. 

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MOOCs: A view from the digital trenches

MOOCs: A view from the digital trenches | Good Pedagogy | Scoop.it
The Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania, where I’m a professor, is among the world’s oldest, largest, and best business schools, with 11 academic departments, 20 research centers, 230 ...

 

If you’re interested in higher education, you’ve probably heard spectacular reports and wild predictions about MOOCs. Pundits, entrepreneurs, university administrators, graduate students, journalists, and politicians have all weighed in on the perils and promise of this new platform for teaching and learning. About the only ones who haven’t written much are the ones in the best position to describe what MOOCs really are: the faculty teaching them.


Via Kim Flintoff
Andreas Kuswara's insight:

From the perspective of someone who already taught MOOC, he mentioned about the fact that (at least in his class) the students are self-selecting already due to the circumstance of the MOOC offers, which should have higher success rate, but not so. What’s the difficulties that he found compared to traditional class; students’ expectation that he perceived; why he thinks faculties teaching MOOC have to prepare the material themselves instead of getting an army of people to support him? Read his insightful dirty little secrets.

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timokos's curator insight, April 16, 2013 3:54 PM

Great report by Kevin Welbach of Wharton on his experiences with producing his first MOOC (and online course in general!)

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MOOCs are a fundamental misperception of how teaching works

MOOCs are a fundamental misperception of how teaching works | Good Pedagogy | Scoop.it
During break (e.g., multi-hour long car rides), I gave a lot of thought to MOOCs and the changes that are coming to higher education. I realized that people can only believe that MOOCs can replace ...

Via Mike Keppell
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Andreas Kuswara's comment, January 31, 2013 8:36 PM
I think many people actually have a misperception about MOOC either, I believe the author might slightly off in this matter either. MOOC seems to have become a widely misunderstood animal by both supporters and oppositions alike. I agree with the writer that MOOC doesn’t replace teachers; if we can find anything, any physical object, already exists in today’s classroom, just to illustrate what MOOC’s role could be, I would probably pick up the classroom itself.
MOOC is like a classroom with plenty of interesting, can be useful, stuffs attached to it, hanged to it; like a classroom with a contact list attached to it next to a phone, so we can contact support, is what the “help” menu provides. It might have a class directory consisting the names of other students, so we can contact each other, it has a blackboard and projector, which are screens to display various contents, text and graphics, etc. it provides chairs where students can sit down and talk to each other, forming collaborative learning. the discussion in the classroom can only be as effective as the engagement of the students as collaborators to discuss. We never argue that a classroom can replace a teacher, neither can MOOC replace teachers.
However, just as when we introduce the interactive board to the classroom, something changes to the classroom. Something can change to the way teacher teach. Something can change to the way student discuss and collaborate. As any piece of equipment introduced to the classroom, a potential affordance is introduced into the ecosystem; because we see the environment – classroom – not simply as an environment, but also as an ecosystem.
MOOC is, I believe, an ecosystem for learning; which can’t alienate any member of a learning ecosystem. Of course, when one expand this ecosystem to include the university administrators, building operator, etc to form a super-ecosystem, a different story can emerge. But let’s see MOOC as a learning ecosystem for learning. How each organism live in this ecosystem might change, how each organism interact with each other might change; for the better, we hope.
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MOOCs are your friends

MOOCs are your friends | Good Pedagogy | Scoop.it
(I know what you're thinking: "if only someone would write an opinion blog post on MOOCs, there just aren't any out there"). Reactions to MOOCs tend to fall into two camps. The first is the MOOC...
Andreas Kuswara's insight:

an interesting opinion piece on MOOC

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Is a 100,000:1 Student-to-Teacher Ratio Appealing?

Is a 100,000:1 Student-to-Teacher Ratio Appealing? | Good Pedagogy | Scoop.it
MOOCs capitalize on the limitations of higher educations. (Is a 100,000:1 Student-to-Teacher Ratio Appealing? - http://t.co/2Z7c44Wj #mooc)

Via Helen Farley
Andreas Kuswara's insight:

i think it's one facet of MOOC, which is its "scalable affordance", the unpacking of "M" of MOOC for "Massive"; can we ever see MOOC from a balance perspective of all what it is, Massive, Open, Online, and Course; so we won't be trapped unrealistic or even irrelevant hype, and can exploit useful affordances.

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Reflecting on MOOCs ("Stanford's Online Strategy", Campus Technology)

Andreas Kuswara's insight:

Article: "Stanford's Online Strategy", Campus Technology

 

i think the most honest and sober assessment of MOOCs comes from John Mitchell, Stanford University, "we really don't know where all this will lead. We’re just committed to improving education as much as we can". it's still experimental and big potential to disrupt the formal education either politically, culturally, pedagogically, etc. but "MOOCs will never replace the incredibly vibrant campus experience", which i think it's true, if your campus does have a vibrant campus experience; otherwise your student might eventually start questioning, why are they there in your campus.

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MOOC pedagogy: the challenges of developing for Coursera

Andreas Kuswara's insight:

Coursera is one of the platform used to deliver MOOC, in my search to answer "is MOOC a pedagogy".

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A MOOC is not a Thing: Emergence, Disruption, and Higher Education

A MOOC is not a Thing: Emergence, Disruption, and Higher Education | Good Pedagogy | Scoop.it
Hybrid Pedagogy is an academic and networked journal of teaching and technology that combines the strands of critical and digital pedagogy to arrive at the best social and civil uses of technology and digital media in education.
Andreas Kuswara's insight:

I have a question: "is MOOC a pedagogy?"

 

"While we’ve all focused our consternation on how MOOCs may take down the walls of the university, or how they may represent the MOOCDonalds of higher ed., we are missing the most important, and most frightening, potential of MOOCs. They force us to reconsider the very fabric of how we think about learning -- its occurrence, emergence, habitat, and administration."

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10 Universities Team To Offer Cross-Institution Online Courses for Credit

10 Universities Team To Offer Cross-Institution Online Courses for Credit | Good Pedagogy | Scoop.it

"Ten universities from Brandeis and Duke to Vanderbilt, Wake Forest, and Washington University in St. Louis are pulling together to launch a new program that delivers credit-bearing online courses to students that may or may not be enrolled in their own institutions"

 

would be interesting to see how the market and students responses.

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How Coursera Is Disrupting the Traditional Classroom

How Coursera Is Disrupting the Traditional Classroom | Good Pedagogy | Scoop.it

Knowledge@Wharton: How Coursera Is Disrupting the Traditional Classroom

Interview with Stanford professor Daphne Koller. MOOCs and formal education experiences, substitute or complement? What the development of MOOCs from the point of view of Coursera, one of the MOOC provider.

 


Via Peter B. Sloep, Peter Mellow
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The 1-minute guide to MOOCs

The 1-minute guide to MOOCs | Good Pedagogy | Scoop.it

If you’re wondering what MOOCs are about, here’s a brief overview. All in 1 minute. For fast readers.


Via Leonardo Ornellas, Dennis T OConnor
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