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Is Millionaire Space Tourist Planning Trip to Mars?

Is Millionaire Space Tourist Planning Trip to Mars? | Good news from the Stars | Scoop.it
Dennis Tito's nonprofit organization may want to launch astronauts toward the Red Planet in 2018.
Guillaume Decugis's insight:
Plan would not be to land but do just a round trip. Still doesn't it sound crazy (and awesom!) that private money could beat governments in the space race?
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To boldly go where only Astrophysicians have gone before. What I find interesting (and can roughly understand) in Astronomy & Space exploration these days.
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We All Might Be Living in an Infinite Pixelized Hologram

We All Might Be Living in an Infinite Pixelized Hologram | Good news from the Stars | Scoop.it
Quarks and leptons, the building blocks of matter, are staggeringly small—less than an attometer (a billionth of a billionth of a meter) in diameter. But zoom in closer—a billion times more—past zeptometers and yoctometers, to where the units run out of names. Then keep going, a hundred million times smaller still, and you finally hit bottom: This is the Planck length, the smallest possible unit in the universe. Beyond this point, physicists say, the very notion of distance becomes meaningless.
Guillaume Decugis's insight:

Are quanta and the planck constant signs that our universe is pixelized?

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Europe makes space history as Philae probe lands on comet

Europe makes space history as Philae probe lands on comet | Good news from the Stars | Scoop.it
BERLIN/FRANKFURT (Reuters) - The European Space Agency (ESA) landed a probe on a comet on Wednesday, a first in space exploration and the climax of a decade-long mission to examine up close the remnants
Guillaume Decugis's insight:

It's not everyday that Europe makes space history. Happy and proud. 

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Theoretical physics: The origins of space and time

Theoretical physics: The origins of space and time | Good news from the Stars | Scoop.it

Many researchers believe that physics will not be complete until it can explain not just the behavior of space and time, but where these entities come from.



Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
Guillaume Decugis's insight:

A recap on the unifying theories that could explain the fabric of our universe.

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Tekrighter's curator insight, June 25, 9:36 AM

Gravity as thermodynamics reinforces the idea of gravity as an emergent property of space-time...

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NASA Reveals Latest Warp-Drive Ship Designs

NASA Reveals Latest Warp-Drive Ship Designs | Good news from the Stars | Scoop.it
Look at the picture above. Nope, it’s not a snapshot of a Star Wars scene, or any other sci-fi movie. It’s what you get if you combine a NASA physicist working on achieving faster-than-light travel with a 3D artist, and the result is freaking AWESOME. And yes, you heard correctly, there are scientists working on faster-than-light travel, and this is what the ship could look like in the future.
Guillaume Decugis's insight:

Beyond the click bait graphic, I recommend to watch the video: it's awesome and explains in very simple terms the concept and challenges of FTL travel based on the warp drive theory. Plus some othee more accessible discoveries that could change space exploration sooner. 

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The first habitable exoplanet

The first habitable exoplanet | Good news from the Stars | Scoop.it
Sifting through observations from tens of thousands of distant stars, astronomers say they have discovered the first definitive Earth-sized planet that orbits in a habitable zone where water could exist in liquid form — a necessary condition for...
Guillaume Decugis's insight:
Meet Kepler-186f, the most 'Earth-like' planet ever: roughly the same size and in that area of its system where water - and therefore life as we know it - can exist in liquid form. It's not millions of light-years away but it would still take some generations to cruise there even at he speed of light.
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This Nature video explains why the recent big bang evidence discovery is such a big deal

Scientists from the Centre for Astrophysics have found evidence of gravitational waves created mere moments after the dawn of the Universe. These waves were created in a period of rapid expansion called cosmic inflation. This new evidence could prove the definitive confirmation of the inflation theory. It seems that finally, scientists can claim to understand the goings on at the beginning of everything.

Guillaume Decugis's insight:

The recent discovery of the first direct evidence of cosmic inflation is a big deal: until now, the Big Bang has only been a theory.


Until now.

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60,000 miles up: Space elevator could be built by 2035, new study says

60,000 miles up: Space elevator could be built by 2035, new study says | Good news from the Stars | Scoop.it

Imagine a ribbon roughly one hundred million times as long as it is wide. If it were a meter long, it would be 10 nanometers wide, or just a few times thicker than a DNA double helix. Scaled up to the length of a football field, it would still be less than a micrometer across — smaller than a red blood cell. Would you trust your life to that thread? What about a tether 100,000 kilometers long, one stretching from the surface of the Earth to well past geostationary orbit (GEO, 22,236 miles up), but which was still somehow narrower than your own wingspan?


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
Guillaume Decugis's insight:

Hundreds of challenges remain to be solved but as even NASA struggles to maintain an edge, the pay-off of a Space Elevator has never been clearer. The original idea of Konstantin Tsiolkovsky which Arthur C. Clarke turned into a novel could be the revolution space exploration needs.

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aanve's curator insight, March 7, 9:38 PM
www.aanve.com
Laura E. Mirian, PhD's curator insight, March 9, 12:49 AM

Think I will pass on this

Linda Liem's curator insight, March 9, 8:06 AM

Science fiction may be coming true.

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Is the Universe made of math?

Is the Universe made of math? | Good news from the Stars | Scoop.it
BROOKLYN, N.Y. — Scientists have long used mathematics to describe the physical properties of the universe. But what if the universe itself is math?
Guillaume Decugis's insight:
Yes: how about considering things the other way around? If cosmologist Max Tegmark's intuition is true this physicist says we can potentially understand all of it. But as he puts it, 'If My Idea Is Wrong, Physics Is Ultimately Doomed'
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Live from Mars: Private Red Planet Mission to Beam Video to Earth in 2018

Live from Mars: Private Red Planet Mission to Beam Video to Earth in 2018 | Good news from the Stars | Scoop.it

WASHINGTON — The Mars One colonization project plans to bring live video of the surface of Mars to Earth via a privately built communications satellite and lander to launch as part of an unmanned mission to the Red Planet in 2018.

 


Via Stratocumulus
Guillaume Decugis's insight:

Amazing development of the private sector space industry. While we can always regret NASA didn't send a man to walk on Mars yet, what we're seeing from private initiatives will probably lead to a much stronger space coloinzation effort in the long run.

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Would You Pay $75,000 to Ride This Spectacular Balloon to Space?

Would You Pay  $75,000 to Ride This Spectacular Balloon to Space? | Good news from the Stars | Scoop.it
Space tourism sounds exciting and unforgettable and all, but with a single trip costing as much as a small house, it's simply out of reach for the average person.
Guillaume Decugis's insight:
So these guys came out with the cheap(er) version: a Bautmgartner-like balloon but bigger. Not quite space, no zero-G but a 1/3 of a Virgin Galactic ticket.
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Scientists Unconvinced By 'Evidence For Alien Life'

Scientists Unconvinced By 'Evidence For Alien Life' | Good news from the Stars | Scoop.it
Have scientists found alien life in our atmosphere?
Guillaume Decugis's insight:

Unlikely say many scientists who criticize the rapid conclusion the University of Sheffield scientists arrived at. This is just one article but after being intrigued by my previous post on this, I investigated further and found the scientific community has been raising many concerns such as :

- we don't know whether the box where they found the organism was properly isolated nor how it was open after landing
- no tests we're run to see whether similar organisms exist on earth
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Vincent Demay's comment, October 17, 2013 12:33 PM
@Guillaume Decugis I love your topic!
Vincent Demay's comment, October 17, 2013 12:34 PM
@Marc Rougier you should read that!
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Earth Life Likely Came from Mars, Study Suggests

Earth Life Likely Came from Mars, Study Suggests | Good news from the Stars | Scoop.it
We may all be Martians. Evidence is building that Earth life originated on Mars and was brought to our planet aboard a meteorite, says biochemist Steven Benner of The Westheimer Institute for Science and Technology in Florida.
Guillaume Decugis's insight:

Sounds counter-intuitive and I find it hard to believe. But then again it's just one theory among many.

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What might have been: Visiting Mars and Venus with Apollo-era hardware

What might have been: Visiting Mars and Venus with Apollo-era hardware | Good news from the Stars | Scoop.it
Expecting a surge of support after the Moon landings, NASA started thinking big.
Guillaume Decugis's insight:
Fascinating story of the Apollo application program detailing plans to fly by Venus and Mars with Apollo capsules.
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An Astronaut Reveals What Life in Space Is Really Like

An Astronaut Reveals What Life in Space Is Really Like | Good news from the Stars | Scoop.it
Dan Winters There’s no way to anticipate the emotional impact of leaving your home planet. You look down at Earth and realize: You’re not on it. It’s breathtaking. It’s surreal. It’s a “we’re not in Kansas anymore, Toto” kind of feeling.
Guillaume Decugis's insight:
Great details on what life in space feels like.
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The Physics of a Spinning Spacecraft

The Physics of a Spinning Spacecraft | Good news from the Stars | Scoop.it
Adding a circular motion to a spacecraft creates a gravity-like effect.
Guillaume Decugis's insight:
And the formula that correlates them.
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Milky Way may bear 100 million life-giving planets

Milky Way may bear 100 million life-giving planets | Good news from the Stars | Scoop.it
“ (Phys.org) —There are some 100 million other places in the Milky Way galaxy that could support complex life, report a group of university astronomers in the journal Challenges.”
Via Jeff Powell
Guillaume Decugis's insight:
Despite skepticism, statistics are clear: the odds of earth being unique are small.
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The Moon Now Has a Better Internet Connection Than You Thanks to NASA

The Moon Now Has a Better Internet Connection Than You Thanks to NASA | Good news from the Stars | Scoop.it
It's tough to find a good Internet speed without paying your cable provider through the nose to get it, but NASA can get you one... if you live on the Moon.
Guillaume Decugis's insight:

Ready to move?

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Vincent Lieser's curator insight, June 3, 7:28 PM

Information overflow goes interplanetary. 

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Big Bang author Professor Andrei Linde gets surprise visit as his theory was just proven.

Assistant Professor Chao-Lin Kuo surprises Professor Andrei Linde with evidence that supports cosmic inflation theory. The discovery, made by Kuo and his colleagues at the BICEP2 experiment, represents the first images of gravitational waves, or ripples in space-time. These waves have been described as the "first tremors of the Big Bang."

Guillaume Decugis's insight:

This is probably what scientists live for: the unique moment in one's career when the theory you built is proven true. Awesome.

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Elon Musk Is About To Launch The Heaviest Rocket In Existence — And Yes, It Can Reach Mars

Elon Musk Is About To Launch The Heaviest Rocket In Existence — And Yes, It Can Reach Mars | Good news from the Stars | Scoop.it
This one ship is the equivalent of 15 Boeing 747s bundled together and running at full power.
Guillaume Decugis's insight:

Space X latest version of the Falcon rocket will be no less than the heaviest rocket in existence, coming only third to Saturn V and the Russian Energia rocket in history. 

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We Need To Get More Comfortable With People Dying In Space

We Need To Get More Comfortable With People Dying In Space | Good news from the Stars | Scoop.it

It would be wonderful if nobody died in our efforts to explore space. But building a program around that goal is no way to accomplish anything of note.

Guillaume Decugis's insight:

It's safer to be an astronaut than a mountaineer or a navy pilot.


We need to change that and go back to the days where there was not only risk but reward.  In this article, Mollie Hemingway argues that the space shuttles deadly accidents were hard to accept not per se but because they seemed to be having had trivial objectives. 


It's great to see arguments piling up for that debate. And it's also important to remember that the greatest risk might be not to take any.

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Vincent Lieser's curator insight, February 5, 4:31 PM

There is no solar-system-wide civilisation if it's risk-free.

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Chandra helps confirm evidence of jet in Milky Way’s black hole | Astronomy.com

Chandra helps confirm evidence of jet in Milky Way’s black hole | Astronomy.com | Good news from the Stars | Scoop.it

Astronomers have finally identified a jet in Sagittarius A*, the supermassive black hole at the center of the Milky Way.

Guillaume Decugis's insight:

This is a fascinating discovery...

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Astrophysicists launch ambitious assessment of galaxy formation simulations

Astrophysicists launch ambitious assessment of galaxy formation simulations | Good news from the Stars | Scoop.it

One of the most powerful tools for understanding the formation and evolution of galaxies has been the use of computer simulations—numerical models of astrophysical processes run on supercomputers and compared with astronomical observations. Getting computer simulations to produce realistic-looking galaxies has been a challenge, however, and different codes (simulation programs) produce inconsistent results.

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EVA 23: a little bit of Gravity... for real

EVA 23: a little bit of Gravity... for real | Good news from the Stars | Scoop.it
Even though we are both heading to more or less the same part of the International Space Station, our routes are completely different, set out by the choreography we have studied meticulously. My route is direct, towards the back of the Station, while Chris has to go towards the front first in order to wind his cable around Z1, the central truss structure above Node 1. At that moment, none of us in orbit or on Earth could have imagined just how much this decision would influence the events of the day.
Guillaume Decugis's insight:
No need to see the Gravity movie to get a good space thriller: this actual story from an Italian astronaut is actually quite scary.
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Alien life found living in Earth's atmosphere, claims scientist

Alien life found living in Earth's atmosphere, claims scientist | Good news from the Stars | Scoop.it
Aliens do exist and have been found living in the clouds above the Peak District, according to new claims by scientists.
Guillaume Decugis's insight:
"Our conclusion is that life is continually arriving to Earth from space" said the scientists who discovered these microcospic life forms by bringing them back to the ground from a scientific balloon. Comets - they say - are how they got here. While this is fascinating, the discovery has been met with skepticism by the scientific community. Eager to see what's coming next...UPDATE: so what's next is more and more skepticism by the scientific community: http://www.scoop.it/t/good-news-from-the-stars/p/4008117791/scientists-unconvinced-by-evidence-for-alien-life
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Physicists To Test If Universe Is A Computer Simulation

Physicists To Test If Universe Is A Computer Simulation | Good news from the Stars | Scoop.it
Physicists have devised a new experiment to test if the universe is a computer. A philosophical thought experiment has long held that it is more likely than not that we're living inside a machine.

Via dannybloomfield
Guillaume Decugis's insight:

Very meta but interesting read. Are we in a matrix? 

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Ally Greer's curator insight, October 15, 2013 2:35 PM

Can hardly wrap my brain around this concept and yet it so excites me. I know @Guillaume Decugis loves matrices!

Ludovic LE MOAN's comment, January 12, 4:31 AM
I am surprised to find this article since I believe myself, we are part of a simulator. My idea to try to prove it should be to find a gap in our time scale. If we can demonstrate the time is not continious, we will have found this evidence. Like a computer time is sharing by processus, it should be the same for universe!
Guillaume Decugis's comment, January 12, 7:23 PM
I've just read an interesting SF novel on that topic: Redshirts by John Scalzi http://www.amazon.com/Redshirts-A-Novel-Three-Codas/dp/0765334798 Interesting read on that topic!