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Good News For A Change
Stories about the glass half full
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Rescooped by Bobby Dillard from Meditation Compassion Mindfulness
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6 Scientifically Proven Ways To Boost Your Self-Control

6 Scientifically Proven Ways To Boost Your Self-Control | Good News For A Change | Scoop.it

The prefontal cortex (that section of the brain right behind your forehead) is the part that helps us with things like decision-making and regulating our behavior. Self-control, or willpower, falls under this heading, and thus is taken care of in this part of the brain.

 

To be effective at controlling our urges and making sound decisions, the prefontal cortex needs to be looked after. That means feeding it with good-quality food so it has enough energy to do its job and getting enough sleep.

 


Via Pamir Kiciman
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Eric Chan Wei Chiang's curator insight, July 13, 10:31 PM

The human brain is a finely tuned machine which needs to be taken care of. Read more about the brain here:

http://www.scoop.it/t/biotech-and-beyond/?tag=Brain

 

A previous scoop also describes ways to maintain our focus in the digital age of limitless information http://sco.lt/90xEu1

Rescooped by Bobby Dillard from Empowering Solutions
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Do You Know This Scientific Solution For Performing Well Under Pressure? - by Dumb Little Man

Do You Know This Scientific Solution For Performing Well Under Pressure? - by Dumb Little Man | Good News For A Change | Scoop.it


What if I told you there was a simple action anyone can take to deflate a high pressure situation? Such a simple action exists, and it's based on a 2013 study that suggests high-pressure performance depends on which side of the brain you rely on.


Via The BioSync Team
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The BioSync Team's curator insight, November 4, 2013 2:19 PM

Use the "correct" side of your brain and easily deflate a high pressure situation.

Read More ...

Angie Mc's curator insight, November 4, 2013 2:39 PM

Can simply clenching your left hand reduce stress? The athletes in this house are willing to give it a try!

Rescooped by Bobby Dillard from Empowering Solutions
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Why We Stop Learning: The Paradox of Expertise

Why We Stop Learning: The Paradox of Expertise | Good News For A Change | Scoop.it
How to keep learning when people think you know it all.

Via The BioSync Team
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The BioSync Team's curator insight, March 28, 2013 11:34 AM

Think of yourself as a student of life continously learning rather than identifying as an expert.

Read More: http://www.psychologytoday.com/collections/201303/the-social-brain/why-we-stop-learning-the-paradox-expertise

 

Rescooped by Bobby Dillard from The Butterfly Maiden Project
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Stop Trying to Solve Problems

Stop Trying to Solve Problems | Good News For A Change | Scoop.it
Hack the brain to increase complex problem solving.

Via Caroline Carlicchi, Janet Louise Stephenson
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Rescooped by Bobby Dillard from Leadership
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Choose Experiences that Positively Retrain Your Brain

Choose Experiences that Positively Retrain Your Brain | Good News For A Change | Scoop.it
I often hear people say, "I'm the kind of person who…" or, "I'm not a people person.” These seemingly off-the-cuff comments suggest they’re resigned to not changing their self-perception – regardless (Seek Experiences That Positively Reshape Your ...

Via Susan Taylor, Ivan Berlocher
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Susan Taylor's curator insight, November 19, 2013 2:35 PM

Dr. Richard Davidson suggests that "using our experiences to positively shift our self-perception" will retrain your brain.

 

Did you know that playing just 2 hours of a video game can structurally change your brain?  Imagine that!  Just 2 hours with a joystick can actually change the structure of your brain.  This "underscores how extraordinarily dynamic our brains are, constantly being shaped this way and that."  And it happens so fast.  Studies show that an average adult generates 5,000 to 10,000 new brain cells every single day.

 

Most people are not very willing to shift their worldview.  And most often, we are unconscious of how our brain is being shaped by the forces around us. But in knowing that the brain changes in response to our experiences, actions and relationships, we can take advantage of this knowledge and "actually play a more intentional role in shaping our own brains in ways that may be heath promoting and in ways that can cultivate well-being".

 

 

 

Rescooped by Bobby Dillard from Meditation Compassion Mindfulness
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Life's Messy. Train Your Brain to Adapt

Life's Messy. Train Your Brain to Adapt | Good News For A Change | Scoop.it
Margaret Moore, co-founder and co-director of the Institute of Coaching at McLean Hospital/ Harvard Medical School, answers all our burning questions about how to sift through the chaos of the digital age and organize our lives and minds.

 

Organization, she says, is not just about a cluttered desk. It’s about self-regulation, a skill that is developed by the pre-frontal cortex--the seat of executive function in the brain. The left pre-frontal cortex regulates your attention: it evaluates, judges, makes decisions. Modern life, with its barrage of incoming emails and phone calls and texts, taxes the pre-frontal cortex, inhibiting the brain’s ability to focus. Those who have naturally strong self-regulation can handle the overload—and those who don’t are left feeling guilty and out of control.

But the plasticity of the brain means we can all learn to be better focused and more organized.


Via Pamir Kiciman
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Melanie Greenberg's curator insight, October 28, 2013 4:22 PM

We need to learn and practice self-control and Mindfulness to overcome the barrage of distractions.

Rescooped by Bobby Dillard from Professional Communication
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Teaching & Learning - Brain-Based Online Learning Design - Magna Publications

Teaching & Learning - Brain-Based Online Learning Design - Magna Publications | Good News For A Change | Scoop.it

Abreena Tompkins, instruction specialist at Surry Community College, has developed a brain-based online course design model based on a meta-analysis of more than 300 articles. In this study, she distilled the following elements of brain-based course design:

Low-risk, nonthreatening learning environment Challenging, real-life, authentic assessments Rhythms, patterns, and cycles Appropriate chunking or grouping Learning as orchestration rather than lecture or facilitation Appropriate level of novelty Appropriately timed breaks and learning periods Purposeful assessments Learning that addresses visual, auditory, and kinesthetic learners Active processing with mental models The use of universal examples, analogies, and parallel processing


Via Dennis T OConnor, Patty Ball, Rosário Durão
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