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Recognizing and Overcoming False Growth Mindset

Recognizing and Overcoming False Growth Mindset | Good ideas about learning | Scoop.it
Examples of a false growth mindset include praising effort over progress, affirming students' potential without enabling them, and blaming their mindset instead of refocusing it.
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Understanding "buzz" words

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Good ideas about learning
Helping students become successful learners.  Focusing on Metacognition
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Made With Play: Game-Based Learning Resources

Made With Play: Game-Based Learning Resources | Good ideas about learning | Scoop.it
Edutopia's Made With Play series takes a look at game-like learning principles in action and commercial games in real classrooms -- and offers tips and tools for bringing them into your own practice.
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35 Educational Resources to Encourage Inquiry & Inventive Thinking | Childhood101

35 Educational Resources to Encourage Inquiry & Inventive Thinking | Childhood101 | Good ideas about learning | Scoop.it
I’ve scoured the internet, including all of my favourite social media sites, to bring you a fantastic collection of online inquiry and inventive thinking resources that I know will inspire and motivate both you and your students. The collection includes Lego, science, practical activity ideas, engineering, videos, animation, technology and a tonne of fun facts – so there is sure to be something for everyone!

Via John Evans
Frances's insight:
The range of things kids can/need to learn.
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Chris Carter's curator insight, May 12, 5:28 PM
I love maker-space materials!
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[PDF] New Vision for Education: Fostering Social and Emotional Learning through Technology

[PDF] New Vision for Education: Fostering Social and Emotional Learning through Technology | Good ideas about learning | Scoop.it
The New Vision for Education project examines the role that technology can potentially play to improve education for the future. In phase II, we investigated innovative ways to help students develop competencies* and character qualities** broadly defined as social emotional skills, which are critical components of 21st century skill framework but not a core focus in today’s curriculum.
 
Can technology effectively facilitate the development of competencies and character qualities, in addition to cognitive skills? If yes, what are the opportunities to capture to make it happen? What are the immediate, mid-term, and long-term barriers to remove? How can multistakeholders work together to create a roadmap for this vision?
 
In seeking answers to these questions, the report assembles a list of 55 research-based digital product features that are highly correlated with the ten competencies and character qualities and identifies five nascent technology trends – wearable devices, leading-edge apps, virtual reality, advanced analytics and machine learning, and affective computing – that extend ways of fostering social emotional learning (SEL) and also offer potential for exciting new learning strategies. The report concludes with recommendations to each stakeholder on actions to advance SEL and SEL technology adoption.
 

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Andrés E. Henao's curator insight, April 27, 10:44 PM
On the side of the branched article ''What are the 21st-century skills every student needs?'', the current resume outlines an issue that is impossible to leave aside in nowaday's e-learning spread. Essentially, virtuality seems to replicate a world where an excess amount of needs constantly stress progression while disregarding the menace of a possible senseless or sterile community whose socia emotionall awareness may be already degrading.
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4 Reasons That Technology Might Not Be Helping Them Learn -

4 Reasons That Technology Might Not Be Helping Them Learn - | Good ideas about learning | Scoop.it
4 Reasons That Technology Might Not Be Helping Them Learn by Nira Dale, K-12 Instructional Specialist Yes, even teachers make mistakes. I know because I’m one of those “mistake-making teachers.” I’ve taught students of all ability-levels; I’m now serving as an instructional specialist in a 1:1 school [...]
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Ownership is important regardless  of the task or tool
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Personalize Learning: Continuum of Ownership: Developing Autonomy

Personalize Learning: Continuum of Ownership: Developing Autonomy | Good ideas about learning | Scoop.it
The Continuum of Ownership demonstrates how learners move from compliance to autonomy as they become responsible and drive their learning.
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The Minecraft Generation By Clive Thompson

The Minecraft Generation By Clive Thompson | Good ideas about learning | Scoop.it
By CLIVE THOMPSON

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
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Ventaneando's curator insight, April 18, 11:37 PM

"La generación Minecraftiana marcada por una serie de tendencias que empezaron con el social media" 

nukem777's curator insight, April 19, 6:40 AM
Kind of reads like old folks not getting the young folks...the kids are all right at my house, don't know about yours...the big point is we all have to be looking out for each other or the AI's are gonna take over.
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How to Fix 7 Counterproductive Learning Habits | #LEARNing2LEARN

How to Fix 7 Counterproductive Learning Habits | #LEARNing2LEARN | Good ideas about learning | Scoop.it
At some point in our lives, we’ve all practiced some counterproductive learning habits. We’ve sabotaged ourselves without realizing it, and found ourselves stuck. There have been failures we believe have defined our potential. We’ve obsessed over perfect solutions and singular pathways. In frustrated moments we’ve refused help from others, thinking acceptance means weakness. We’ve done this as teachers, students, friends, and parents.


These are not crimes; they’re part of what makes us human. Our counterproductive learning habits usually come from what we observe and hear. We pick things up as children from well-intentioned adults in our lives. In addition, the experiences of others constantly unfold right in front of us. We observe actively, and we remember.


Eventually we come to believe that what we see is how things are, and that it never changes. We know now that this doesn’t have to be the case. We know now that we can create our own experiences. Let’s make them good ones when it comes to learning.

 

Leartn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2015/07/19/learning-path-for-professional-21st-century-learning-by-ict-practice/

 

 


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Frances's insight:
At some point in our lives, we’ve all practiced some counterproductive learning habits. We’ve sabotaged ourselves without realizing it, and found ourselves stuck. There have been failures we believe have defined our potential. We’ve obsessed over perfect solutions and singular pathways. In frustrated moments we’ve refused help from others, thinking acceptance means weakness. We’ve done this as teachers, students, friends, and parents.


These are not crimes; they’re part of what makes us human. Our counterproductive learning habits usually come from what we observe and hear. We pick things up as children from well-intentioned adults in our lives. In addition, the experiences of others constantly unfold right in front of us. We observe actively, and we remember.


Eventually we come to believe that what we see is how things are, and that it never changes. We know now that this doesn’t have to be the case. We know now that we can create our own experiences. Let’s make them good ones when it comes to learning.

 

Leartn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2015/07/19/learning-path-for-professional-21st-century-learning-by-ict-practice/

 

 

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Juan Quiñones's curator insight, March 28, 11:40 PM
At some point in our lives, we’ve all practiced some counterproductive learning habits. We’ve sabotaged ourselves without realizing it, and found ourselves stuck. There have been failures we believe have defined our potential. We’ve obsessed over perfect solutions and singular pathways. In frustrated moments we’ve refused help from others, thinking acceptance means weakness. We’ve done this as teachers, students, friends, and parents.


These are not crimes; they’re part of what makes us human. Our counterproductive learning habits usually come from what we observe and hear. We pick things up as children from well-intentioned adults in our lives. In addition, the experiences of others constantly unfold right in front of us. We observe actively, and we remember.


Eventually we come to believe that what we see is how things are, and that it never changes. We know now that this doesn’t have to be the case. We know now that we can create our own experiences. Let’s make them good ones when it comes to learning.

 

Leartn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2015/07/19/learning-path-for-professional-21st-century-learning-by-ict-practice/

 

 

Karen B Wehner's curator insight, March 31, 1:36 PM
At some point in our lives, we’ve all practiced some counterproductive learning habits. We’ve sabotaged ourselves without realizing it, and found ourselves stuck. There have been failures we believe have defined our potential. We’ve obsessed over perfect solutions and singular pathways. In frustrated moments we’ve refused help from others, thinking acceptance means weakness. We’ve done this as teachers, students, friends, and parents.


These are not crimes; they’re part of what makes us human. Our counterproductive learning habits usually come from what we observe and hear. We pick things up as children from well-intentioned adults in our lives. In addition, the experiences of others constantly unfold right in front of us. We observe actively, and we remember.


Eventually we come to believe that what we see is how things are, and that it never changes. We know now that this doesn’t have to be the case. We know now that we can create our own experiences. Let’s make them good ones when it comes to learning.

 

Leartn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2015/07/19/learning-path-for-professional-21st-century-learning-by-ict-practice/

 

 

JunoPark's curator insight, April 2, 3:45 AM
At some point in our lives, we’ve all practiced some counterproductive learning habits. We’ve sabotaged ourselves without realizing it, and found ourselves stuck. There have been failures we believe have defined our potential. We’ve obsessed over perfect solutions and singular pathways. In frustrated moments we’ve refused help from others, thinking acceptance means weakness. We’ve done this as teachers, students, friends, and parents.


These are not crimes; they’re part of what makes us human. Our counterproductive learning habits usually come from what we observe and hear. We pick things up as children from well-intentioned adults in our lives. In addition, the experiences of others constantly unfold right in front of us. We observe actively, and we remember.


Eventually we come to believe that what we see is how things are, and that it never changes. We know now that this doesn’t have to be the case. We know now that we can create our own experiences. Let’s make them good ones when it comes to learning.

 

Leartn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2015/07/19/learning-path-for-professional-21st-century-learning-by-ict-practice/

 

 

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How to Scaffold Skills for Student Discussions

How to Scaffold Skills for Student Discussions | Good ideas about learning | Scoop.it
By Jackie A. Walsh How would you rate the quality of student talk in your classroom? Does it help your kids dig down deeper and learn more? Or do you sometimes feel that it’s not the best investment of class time? Student skills are the means and ends of productive classroom discussions. When students engage in meaningful academic conversation, they are intentional in their use of important social, cognitive, and use-of-knowledge skills. In turn, when students are deliberate in the use of these skills, they are enhancing their ability to engage in thoughtful discourse in academic settings and beyond—in the workplace and in our democratic society. We can all agree these are important goals, but we also know that most students do not arrive in our classrooms with a high level of proficiency in these skills. It’s up to us, and we must be explicit in teaching them and in scaffolding their use over time. In this article I want to look at some ways we can do that. What are the most important skills for good classroom talk? Improving student skills requires focus and intentionality. So where can teachers turn as they think about which skills to spotlight for their students? My colleague Beth Sattes and I have identified a menu of skills, the framework for which looks like this: Capacities Associated with Skilled Discussion (p. 39, Questioning for Classroom Discussion – ASCD, 2015) The skills probably look very familiar to you as they mirror the requirements of CCSS and other new state and content standards. Consider social skills, for example, which essentially determine the quality of student interactions one with another. What connections can you make between the examples listed below and the ELA Speaking and Listening standards embodied in CCSS? Speaking Skills Speaks at length so that thinking is visible. . . . Paraphrases portions of a text. . . . Listening Skills Waits before adding one’s own ideas. . . . Looks at the speaking student & gives nonverbal response. . . . Collaborating Skills “Piggybacks” and elaborates on classmates’ comments. Actively seeks to include classmates who are not participating. One of the primary instructional purposes of a discussion is to afford students the opportunity to think more deeply about content, to make personal meaning through individual and collaborative inquiry. The use of cognitive skills moves student talk from a simple exchange of information to dialogue involving more complex reasoning or generative thinking. Use of the kinds of cognitive skills featured below engage students in the levels of thinking associated with levels 2 and 3 of Webb’s Depth of Knowledge: Connection-Making Skills Identifies similarities and differences. . . . Offers reasons and textual evidence. . . . Questioning Skills Poses questions to clarify and better understand. . . . Asks questions to identify a speaker’s assumptions. Creating Skills Draws inferences from other speakers’ ideas. . . . Integrates information from multiple sources. . . . Attending to discussion timing and preparation One key to the success of discussions relates to timing—the point in an instructional cycle when they occur. Most productive discussions take place only after students have had the opportunity to build or access the knowledge base required for an informed exchange. If this condition is not met, then the discussion may devolve into an “exchange of ignorance.” Not only do we need to position discussions strategically, we should also afford students the opportunity to get ready. Preparing oftentimes engages students in the close reading of a text or the careful review of data generated by an experiment or reflection on a solution path to a problem. When teachers attend to timing and student preparation as they plan a discussion, they pave the way for students’ thoughtful use of knowledge during the discourse. However, as with social and cognitive skills, students need to know teacher expectations in this area. Three categories of knowledge can contribute meaningfully to a classroom discussion: Text-based knowledge is central because it focuses on the topic or issue under consideration. This, of course, is not limited to textbooks, but can include supplemental information accessed online or through relevant print sources—both primary and secondary. Prior academic knowledge can also serve as important fodder for discussion as teachers strive to encourage students to make connections across the curriculum. Finally, the meaningfulness of a discussion increases as students incorporate relevant experiential knowledge gleaned from out-of-school learning. In our own work, we identify specific skills for each of these three sub-categories, but associate the following with all three. Working on discussion skills at Hibbett Middle School, Florence AL Using knowledge to deepen discussion How many of us have had the experience of planning a classroom discussion that ended up feeling like a mere exchange of opinions or, worse yet, a “sharing of ignorance.” Students must understand that the purpose of discussions is to deepen their understanding of content—and that they will be accountable for using knowledge to substantiate their thinking. Use-of-Knowledge Strives for accuracy in presentation of facts. Cites information sources. Evaluates the credibility of information sources. Relates comments to the subject or question for discussion; does not get off topic. Scaffolding the development of skills In our ASCD book Questioning for Classroom Discussion, Beth Sattes and I offer a framework of discussion skills – a total of 47 spanning the three categories – as a resource. We imagine that teachers will scan the list to identify those most appropriate to their students given student age and developmental level and the content or discipline under consideration. It is not enough to present the skills of discussion to students; teachers need to actively scaffold student development of these skills. Teachers can scaffold directly – through modeling and coaching – or indirectly, by selecting structures and protocols that will shape and guide student interactions. The goal is to nurture and support student learning of the skills to the point that students are able to use them independent of the teacher’s intervention. In our book, we refer to these different settings for discussions as “forms” and present three identified forms on a continuum—moving from more teacher control to more student responsibility. The teacher-guided discussion comes first In teacher-guided discussion, teachers assume the role of a “master” discussant who models and coaches student apprentices. As a model, the teacher intentionally spotlights selected skills, thinking aloud to students about what she is doing and why. For example, pausing when a speaker stops talking is particularly important in a discussion. This “talk-free zone” allows the speaker time to reflect and add to a statement. At an appropriate point following this type of pause, the teacher might say: “You probably noticed the few seconds of quiet following Jeremy’s comment. This allowed him time to think about what he had said and to decide if he wanted to say more. And he did! During a discussion each of us needs to use this pause to think about what a speaker has said and decide what we think about it. Do we agree? Or disagree? Do we have something to add?” Teachers can strategically use think-alouds to explain what they are doing as they model key discussion skills. Teachers also use coaching to actively scaffold student thinking and skill development during a discussion. This often takes the form of offering comments or posing follow-up questions to students. Comments may be simple positive reinforcements of desired behaviors. For example, following a student’s request to hear from a classmate who had not previously spoken, the teacher might comment: “I really appreciate Alice’s asking for Marie’s perspective. Everyone else had been talking so much that Marie hadn’t had a chance to say what she was thinking.” During the early stages of students’ learning about skillful discussion, a teacher may need to: request that a student offer evidence to support a statement if a classmate does not; invite a student who has not been engaged to pose a question or make a comment; encourage students to make connections between text-based knowledge and prior learning, and so forth. During teacher-guided discussion, the teacher is alert to opportunities to provide these kinds of scaffolds in unobtrusive ways that do not interfere with the flow of the discussion. Teacher-guided discussions can occur as a whole class or in small groups, depending upon instructional purposes. Students at Florence (AL) Middle School using the Ink Think protocol Then we move to structured small groups As we move along the continuum, structured small groups are an ideal setting for scaffolding student discussion skills through the intentional use of protocols for this purpose. Protocols provide rules, and sometimes step-by-step procedures, to govern who talks when and for how long. In our book we provide examples of student discussions using 15 different structured small group formats. Many of these protocols will be familiar to you: Think-Pair-Share, Ink Think, Think-Puzzle-Explore, and so forth. The key to their use in developing student discussion skills and processes is to: (1) be strategic – selecting a structure that is appropriate both for scaffolding desired skills and for deepening student understanding of content; and (2) be explicit with students as to the the specific skills the structures are intended to develop. Additionally, teachers need to actively monitor students as they interact in small group settings and intervene with personal scaffolding when students are confused or fail to follow the protocol. Following engagement in a discussion scaffolded by small group structures, students should be afforded the opportunity to reflect on their use of intended skills and the ways in which the structure supported this practice. And ultimately to student-driven discussion Student-driven discussion requires the highest level of student skill. Students are required to interact independent of teacher guidance and encouraged to scaffold one another. Socratic Seminars are a well-known form of student-driven discussion if they occur with the teacher seated outside the circle of discussants. There are numerous similar structures for student-driven discussion. Most place a limited number of students (5-9) in an inside circle and position other students on the outside as observers with specific observation tasks. Teachers as designers of classroom discussion Discussion can be a powerful learning strategy for all students—K-12 (and beyond) in all content areas. It does, however, look and sound different at different grade levels and in different content areas. There is no recipe that fits all situations. There is also no way to summarize all the teaching techniques associated with effective academic conversations in a single blog post. In Questioning for Classroom Discussion, we provide resources and strategies that teachers can access and use to plan discussions appropriate for their students. We also incorporate multiple examples of focus questions and strategies in use to serve as models, including QR codes that take readers to videotaped classroom discussions. Our hope is that what I’ve shared here will lead you to consider using the book in your professional work. We believe it will serve as a useful manual of practice for individuals and teams of teachers who commit to more intentional planning and facilitation of discussions. A carefully conceived, well-planned discussion has the potential of engaging the minds and hearts of students, increasing their interest in their studies, and promoting a desire for deeper understanding of issues and topics consequential to their learning and being. Feature image: Jen Roberts, Creative Commons Dr. Jackie Walsh is the co-author, with Beth D. Sattes, of Questioning for Classroom Discussion: Purposeful Speaking, Engaged Listening, Deep Thinking (ASCD, 2015) and three earlier books on Quality Questioning published by Corwin Press. She is also lead consultant to the Alabama Best Practices Center where she designs and facilitates professional learning for ABPC’s statewide educator collaboratives and for the Alabama Instructional Partners Network. She lives in Montgomery, AL. Contact Jackie at walshja@aol.com and follow her on Twitter @Question2Think.
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learntolearn » Blog Archive » Kids as Executive Learners (5): Understanding By Design (UbD)

learntolearn » Blog Archive » Kids as Executive Learners (5): Understanding By Design (UbD) | Good ideas about learning | Scoop.it
meta teaching
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Curious About Design Thinking? Here's a Framework You Can Use in Any Classroom with Any Age Group | John Spencer

Curious About Design Thinking? Here's a Framework You Can Use in Any Classroom with Any Age Group | John Spencer | Good ideas about learning | Scoop.it
The term "design thinking" is often attached to maker spaces and STEM labs. However, design thinking is bigger than STEM. It begins with the premise of tapping into student curiosity and allowing them to create, test and re-create until they eventually ship what they made to a real audience (sometimes global but often local). Design thinking isn't a subject or a topic or a class. It's more of way of solving problems that encourages risk-taking and creativity.

Design thinking is a flexible framework for getting the most out of the creative process. It is used in the arts, in engineering, in the corporate world, and in social and civic spaces. You can use it in every subject with every age group. It works when creating digital content or when building things with duct tape and cardboard.

Via John Evans
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Kathy Lynch's curator insight, February 17, 11:04 PM

Thx John Evans!

davidconover's curator insight, March 7, 5:00 AM
H

In what ways are you using this valuable process in your classroom, your corporate board room or in life?
 
April Ross Media's curator insight, March 13, 9:02 AM
Design Thinking in Every Classroom
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Teacher Comments on Report Cards by Leah Davies, M.Ed.

Dear (Parent’s Name): Spending time and helping (student’s name) in the following ways will provide an incentive for him/her to work harder and learn the skills necessary to achieve in school.
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Let Learning Unfold With The Students In Charge

Let Learning Unfold With The Students In Charge | Good ideas about learning | Scoop.it
The role of teacher needs to be continually adjusted to suit the needs of our learners. Education has catered to the adults for too long and therefore has missed the mark. If we are truly invested in helping our learners become 21st century ready, we need to empower them more and then support them in their success and failures. In this way, they will learn to cope with both of those experiences in meaningful ways.
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learntolearn » Blog Archive » Connecting Frameworks to Lesson Planning (2)

learntolearn » Blog Archive » Connecting Frameworks to Lesson Planning (2) | Good ideas about learning | Scoop.it

SELF-MANAGEMENT 3 Work on the Hard Parts They (the hard parts) do not always get better just through playing the whole game…(need to) single out the hard parts for special attention, practicing them on [...]...

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Reflection: A Tool for Assessment, Empowerment, and Self-Awareness

Reflection: A Tool for Assessment, Empowerment, and Self-Awareness | Good ideas about learning | Scoop.it
Through being reflective about your own teaching practices, model and guide students toward a more reflective approach to their projects, grades, actions, and reactions.

Via Amy Burns
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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, May 11, 10:49 AM
As I interview teachers, the role of reflection is very important to their pedagogic practices. It takes on many different modes: writing, driving to and from work, listening purposefully, etc. It is not a one-size-fits-all.
Helen Teague's curator insight, May 22, 12:21 PM
Schon rules!
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Maker Education and Social-Emotional Development | #MakerED #MakerSpace 

Maker Education and Social-Emotional Development | #MakerED #MakerSpace  | Good ideas about learning | Scoop.it
Planning educational activities that incorporate social-emotional learning has broad benefits. Research shows that SEL can have a positive impact on school climate and promote a host of academic, social, and emotional benefits for students. Durlak, Weissberg et al.'s recent meta-analysis of 213 rigorous studies of SEL in schools indicates that students receiving quality SEL instruction…

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2014/08/20/maker-space-a-new-trend-in-education-and-a-big-responsibility/

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=social+emotional+skills

 


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Gust MEES's curator insight, April 30, 7:57 PM
Planning educational activities that incorporate social-emotional learning has broad benefits. Research shows that SEL can have a positive impact on school climate and promote a host of academic, social, and emotional benefits for students. Durlak, Weissberg et al.'s recent meta-analysis of 213 rigorous studies of SEL in schools indicates that students receiving quality SEL instruction…

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2014/08/20/maker-space-a-new-trend-in-education-and-a-big-responsibility/

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=social+emotional+skills

 

 

Joyce Valenza's curator insight, May 1, 7:50 AM
Considering reflection/SEL in maker learning
queanbricks's comment, May 1, 11:53 PM
Its helpful
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Makerspace Tools

Makerspace Tools | Good ideas about learning | Scoop.it
What are great tools for a makerspace? What materials should I get? I get asked these questions a lot. I can't answer that for you because I do not know the culture of your school. Get your students and staff involved and ask them what they want to create. Ask your students and staff what…
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Does The Grit Narrative Blame Students For School’s Shortcomings?

Does The Grit Narrative Blame Students For School’s Shortcomings? | Good ideas about learning | Scoop.it
Educators are pushing back against the notion that kids need to develop perseverance to get through school they find boring. Part of the responsibility is on
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learntolearn » Blog Archive » Learning Frameworks Focused on Individuals as Learners (6)

learntolearn » Blog Archive » Learning Frameworks Focused on Individuals as Learners (6) | Good ideas about learning | Scoop.it
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Cool Tools for School Success - by Mona Pruett, M.S., OT/L

School success depends on a student’s ability to plan, organize and prioritize tasks, materials, and information; separate main ideas from details; think flexibly; memorize content; and monitor progress toward completing tasks. This webcast will introduce strategies using low tech to high tech tools for developing these executive functioning skills for students on the Autism Spectrum.
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Take Note: How to Curate Learning Digitally

Take Note: How to Curate Learning Digitally | Good ideas about learning | Scoop.it
Going beyond the 4Ss of digital note taking (support, save, search, and share), students should work toward curating, synthesizing, and reflecting on their learning.
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Newton’s New Law of Teaching: When Quality Instruction and Technology Intersect

Newton’s New Law of Teaching: When Quality Instruction and Technology Intersect | Good ideas about learning | Scoop.it
Both of these variables—good teachers and good technology—can transform a student’s learning experience. Each of them are also compromised by the absence of the other. The holy grail of instruction, then, seems to reside in the space occupied by teachers who know their content, know their kids, and know how to weave powerful technology into their instruction.

Via Nik Peachey
Frances's insight:

Can't argue with that. Or can you?

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Jennifer Osborne's curator insight, March 17, 5:56 PM

Can't argue with that. Or can you?

Kelly Hammond's curator insight, March 21, 9:00 AM

Can't argue with that. Or can you?

Stephania Savva's curator insight, April 4, 11:03 AM

Can't argue with that. Or can you?

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#WhosDoingTheWork Conferring Questions | Burkins & Yaris

#WhosDoingTheWork Conferring Questions | Burkins & Yaris | Good ideas about learning | Scoop.it
This infographic presents #WhosDoingTheWork conferring questions for reading and writing workshop.
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learntolearn » Blog Archive » Excerpts from How People Learn (3)

learntolearn » Blog Archive » Excerpts from How People Learn (3) | Good ideas about learning | Scoop.it

LAYING A FOUNDATION “Kids come to the classroom with preconceptions about how the world works.  If their initial understanding is not engaged, they may fail to grasp the new concepts and information they [...]...

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Frameworks for Understanding How People Learn

 

clip from Google Images

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