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CARTE BLANCHE - Wang Yuanling

CARTE BLANCHE - Wang Yuanling | gondwana | Scoop.it

Born and bred on the banks of the Yangtze River, Wang Yuanling naturally turned his camera to the people whose lives are shaped by its waters. His images of his home town, Chongqing, tell the story not only of that place, but also of daily life across China.


Via Mario Pires
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Life-changing awakening - China Daily

Life-changing awakening - China Daily | gondwana | Scoop.it
China Daily
Life-changing awakening
China Daily
"People want to return to Nature, and they aspire to be urban farmers," he says.
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Rescooped by Olivier Bleys Perso from Miscellaneous Topics
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Fear and Loathing at the China Daily

Fear and Loathing at the China Daily | gondwana | Scoop.it
When Mitch Moxley arrived in Beijing in 2007 to work for China's largest English-language daily, he discovered life in the Chinese media could be very strange indeed.

Via David Simpson
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Rescooped by Olivier Bleys Perso from Best of Photojournalism
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China: Daily Life Sept. 2011

China: Daily Life Sept. 2011 | gondwana | Scoop.it

"This Big Picture post gives us a glimpse of daily life in parts of China, documented by wire photographers from the Associated Press, Reuters and Getty. The post begins with a short essay by Reuters photographer Jason Lee. Lee photographed six-year-old Wang Gengxiang, known as the "Masked Boy." Gengxiang was severely burned in an accident involving a burning pile of straw last winter. Most of the skin on the little boy's head was burned off, requiring him to wear a full surgical mask. The mask is said to prevent his scars from becoming infected. According to the local media in the village where Gengxiang was photographed, the doctors cannot continue his skin-graft surgery until his damaged trachea (or windpipe) is strong enough. The Lee essay is following by a black slide, and then more "slice of life" photography from a still somewhat mysterious China."

-- Paula Nelson


Via Philippe Gassmann
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