Going Game Based ...
Follow
Find
50 views | +0 today
 
Rescooped by Kirsten Wilson from The 21st Century
onto Going Game Based with Learning
Scoop.it!

How quest-based learning is improving student achievement

How quest-based learning is improving student achievement | Going Game Based with Learning | Scoop.it
There is a common imperative given to teachers to leave no child behind. This alludes to getting all of our students to similar levels of proficiency by ye

Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge
Kirsten Wilson's insight:

This continues to take a hard look at Game Based Learning with emphasis on questioning, achieving mastery through questioning and feedback.

more...
Jean-Baptiste Houdart's curator insight, April 20, 2014 3:13 AM

Interesting new instructional theory worth keeping track of. Quest Based Learning is a great opportunity to engage learners through fun and challenging activities.

Rosemary Tyrrell's curator insight, April 20, 2014 12:41 PM

Part of the increasing gamification movement. 

Kathy Lynch's curator insight, April 20, 2014 2:15 PM

Thanks, Susan Bainbridge!

Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Kirsten Wilson from Educational Technology News
Scoop.it!

Using Instagram For Social Learning

Using Instagram For Social Learning | Going Game Based with Learning | Scoop.it

"While it may not be obvious at first, some of today’s most popular programs can be used in educational contexts."


Via EDTECH@UTRGV
Kirsten Wilson's insight:

A great way to engage students! Using what we use in our digital life to enhance learning. #nisdNOV8 #nisdchat

more...
SoniaPerezAragon's curator insight, June 3, 5:25 AM

Take a look to this infographic: Interesting ways to use Instagram in educational contexts, a very useful, visual and motivating resource. 

Scooped by Kirsten Wilson
Scoop.it!

Intrinsic Motivation for the Classroom

Intrinsic Motivation for the Classroom | Going Game Based with Learning | Scoop.it
Bring on the i. I just finished reading several books about intrinsic motivation. None of the research is new, so why aren't we incorporating intrinsic motivation into the classroom more? Here are ...
Kirsten Wilson's insight:

Great ideas for tapping into student intrinsic learning.  Also a great resource for those implementing or thinking of implementing the ROLE approach.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Kirsten Wilson from The 21st Century
Scoop.it!

How quest-based learning is improving student achievement

How quest-based learning is improving student achievement | Going Game Based with Learning | Scoop.it
There is a common imperative given to teachers to leave no child behind. This alludes to getting all of our students to similar levels of proficiency by ye

Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge
Kirsten Wilson's insight:

This continues to take a hard look at Game Based Learning with emphasis on questioning, achieving mastery through questioning and feedback.

more...
Jean-Baptiste Houdart's curator insight, April 20, 2014 3:13 AM

Interesting new instructional theory worth keeping track of. Quest Based Learning is a great opportunity to engage learners through fun and challenging activities.

Rosemary Tyrrell's curator insight, April 20, 2014 12:41 PM

Part of the increasing gamification movement. 

Kathy Lynch's curator insight, April 20, 2014 2:15 PM

Thanks, Susan Bainbridge!

Scooped by Kirsten Wilson
Scoop.it!

CodeCombat: Multiplayer Programming

CodeCombat: Multiplayer Programming | Going Game Based with Learning | Scoop.it
Learn programming with a multiplayer live coding strategy game. You're a wizard, and your spells are JavaScript. Free, open source HTML5 game!
Kirsten Wilson's insight:
An excellent way to teach coding!
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Kirsten Wilson from Educational Technology News
Scoop.it!

How Gamification Led to a 260% increase in student activity

How Gamification Led to a 260% increase in student activity | Going Game Based with Learning | Scoop.it

"If you’re running an online course and you’re finding it difficult to keep your students engaged in your community you’ll be glad to know that gamification may be the tool you’re looking for to help inspire students to engage."


Via EDTECH@UTRGV
Kirsten Wilson's insight:

Article with link to research supporting gamification.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Kirsten Wilson
Scoop.it!

Using Minecraft in the Classroom - Center for Educational Improvement

Using Minecraft in the Classroom - Center for Educational Improvement | Going Game Based with Learning | Scoop.it
by Victoria Zelvin. Not too long ago, I briefly touched on some video games that are already making a difference in classrooms. Included in that list was the very popular game Minecraft, which is being used as a teaching tool already. The very popular game is being extensively described as a creativity engine, or video game Legos, but what does it really offer? How does Minecraft work? How can Minecraft be utilized as a tool in the classroom, in tandem with other lessons?

In Survival mode, I smelt clay into bricks, which I then make into blocks for my house.

Minecraft thrives on exploration and creativity, but most of all it is a game that thrives on projects. When playing alone, it is best to give yourself a project — for example, building a house — or some type of goal to strive towards. The game is a creativity engine at it’s core, and utilizes several different game types in play. In Survival Mode, the player is spawned without any tools or direction. It is daytime, and nighttime is coming. Nighttime will bring monsters — such as Zombies, Creepers, Spiders, and more — that will attack, unless you have a well lit, fortified area to call your own. Many players first step in Survival mode is to build a house for themselves, to protect themselves from the elements and monsters. There is also a Hardcore setting to Survival Mode, which utilizes the “one life” policy. If a player is killed in Minecraft, then that game is over, whereas a normal death in Survival Mode would mean the player loses all their items (unless they can get back to where they died, quickly, and recover them). In Creative Mode, the player doesn’t have to worry about monsters. The player can fly, summon any crafting item to them at will, and build to their heart’s content. Some use this mode to build elaborate castles, or massively fortified villages, or even rollercoasters. The possibilities are only limited by imagination.
What does all this mean for teachers and educators? Teachers and educators can go in and custom create worlds with built in goals; for example, what type of metal is best to use as a pickaxe? Why does the gold pickaxe break so easily? By building up a world for students to thrive and play in
MinecraftEdu offers many resources to the skeptical or perhaps overwhelmed to help them get started. On his official website, The Minecraft Teacher, computer teacher Joel Levin chronicles his use of Minecraft in his classroom, as well as offering ideas, mods, and other support for teachers looking to use Minecraft in their classroom. In addition, Mr. Levin is the co-owner of TeacherGaming LLC, whose innovative vision was responsible for the development of MinecraftEdu. His Youtube account, the MinecraftTeachr, has a series of great introduction videos that can help teachers and educators get started.
“What happens when we give students an alternate reality in which to play, experiment, create, collaborate — and yes — sometimes make a hot mess of failure?” asks Diane Main, the Assistant Director of Instructional Techology (Upper School) at the Harker School in San Jose, California. The short answer: “Thrive.” These games are things that students already have access to, and are already teaching themselves with. Whether it is basic coding, to learn how to mod (mod = “modify code”) in items that they desire but cannot build, or simply researching how to build bigger and better items, students are already utilizing these resources. Mojang, the developers, have been very open about the potential use of their game as a teaching tool, and are working with organizations like MinecraftEdu to make it a reality.
Below, there is a video detailing some practical applications of creating your own worlds in Minecraft. This world, called “Foodcraft,” was created by TeacherGaming in conjunction with the American Museum of Natural History. In it, students explored and learned about the growth of an international trading system, supply vs demand, and many other things. It is just one creative example of the myriad of ways that Minecraft can be used in the classroom as an innovative teaching tool.


Posts You Might Also Like

Dream of Data-Driven Instruction a Real Time Reality
LearnLab
The Virtue of Collaborative Inquiry
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Kirsten Wilson
Scoop.it!

10 Best Practices for Implementing Gamification

10 Best Practices for Implementing Gamification | Going Game Based with Learning | Scoop.it
In the second installment of the blog series on gamifying your learning, Karl Kapp outlines best practices in gamification implementations.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Kirsten Wilson
Scoop.it!

The #Gamification Collections

The #Gamification Collections | Going Game Based with Learning | Scoop.it
The #Gamification Collections, by EnGaming: updated automatically with a curated selection of articles, blog posts, videos and photos. (RT @EnGaming1: The #Gamification Collections is out!
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Kirsten Wilson
Scoop.it!

Gaming Glossary: Game-based Learning v. Gamification

Gaming Glossary: Game-based Learning v. Gamification | Going Game Based with Learning | Scoop.it
Terminology can be a double-edged blade… One the one hand, it is useful for explaining, categorising and labeling concepts and ideas. On the other hand (especially in education at times!), it can...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Kirsten Wilson
Scoop.it!

Grading

Throughout this module, games are presented as an alternative form of assessment to grading, but there are a variety of strategies to deal with grading a course that uses games. Keeping Grades and Games Separate ...
Kirsten Wilson's insight:

Resource shared during March 2014 #txeduchat for a possible help for teachers looking for ways to assess learning via traditional grading requirements.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Kirsten Wilson
Scoop.it!

Video Game Review

Video Game Review | Going Game Based with Learning | Scoop.it
The purpose of this form is to review a video game and provide feedback. Students will read your review to determine what games to play in class.
Kirsten Wilson's insight:

Great idea for getting students involved in the decision-making regarding games played in class.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Kirsten Wilson
Scoop.it!

Gamification is not game-based learning

Gamification is not game-based learning | Going Game Based with Learning | Scoop.it
  by  misteraitch    I was prompted to write this as I was part of two recent Twitter conversations that revealed how some teachers still confuse game-based learning (...
Kirsten Wilson's insight:

As many educators further explore game based learning and even gamification as a means to increase student engagement it is important to understand the implications and differences between the two.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Kirsten Wilson
Scoop.it!

UGG Make Your Case

Courtroom Trial Simulation Game
Kirsten Wilson's insight:

Site to "make your case" game for designing persuasive writing. Daughter overheard this as I was curating and immediately was intrigued... proof that how content is presented makes all the difference.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Kirsten Wilson from eVirtual Learning
Scoop.it!

Inventive Games That Teach Kids About Empathy and Social Skills

Inventive Games That Teach Kids About Empathy and Social Skills | Going Game Based with Learning | Scoop.it
Play is nothing if not social. Games organize play, allowing us to wrangle it and use it to experiment with the world. When we play games, more often than not, it's us under the microscope. But there's a trend in design toward video games that build social skills and encourage players to reflect on themselves and their relationships. Here are a few games that do just that.

Via Skipper Abel
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Kirsten Wilson from eVirtual Learning
Scoop.it!

3 Ways Coding and Gaming Can Enhance Learning

3 Ways Coding and Gaming Can Enhance Learning | Going Game Based with Learning | Scoop.it
Coding isn't just for computer science any more. Educators are finding that teaching students to write code and design games enhances learning and creates engagement. These examples illustrate how co

Via Skipper Abel
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Kirsten Wilson
Scoop.it!

Are You an Instructional Designer, a Learning Game Designer or Both?

Are You an Instructional Designer, a Learning Game Designer or Both? | Going Game Based with Learning | Scoop.it
Many instructional designers are now being asked to investigate serious games and gamification for use in their training. The problem? Few instructional designers have real game design experience or skills. Game-based solutions have great potential for learning, but only if they are designed well.
Kirsten Wilson's insight:
A great article on lesson design and game design.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Kirsten Wilson from Digital Storytelling Tools, Apps and Ideas
Scoop.it!

Game-Based Storytelling

Game-Based Storytelling | Going Game Based with Learning | Scoop.it
All games tell stories. Unlike other media (books, television, film), the interactivity puts the player in the role of protagonist.

Via Cindy Rudy
Kirsten Wilson's insight:

Using GBL as an approach to storytelling.  Very thorough explanation of how to teach standards through the GBL approach.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Kirsten Wilson
Scoop.it!

Forget Gold Coins and Badges: The Real Value of...

Forget Gold Coins and Badges: The Real Value of... | Going Game Based with Learning | Scoop.it
"Game-based learning is not gamification!" exclaims Jordan Shapiro, author of FREEPLAY: A Video Game Guide to Maximum Euphoric Bliss.
Kirsten Wilson's insight:
As we learn more about the benefits of GBL this post offers more food for thought on the topic.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Kirsten Wilson
Scoop.it!

Who Needs to Know How to Code - Wall Street Journal

Who Needs to Know How to Code - Wall Street Journal | Going Game Based with Learning | Scoop.it
Wall Street Journal Who Needs to Know How to Code Wall Street Journal Learning to code is gaining popularity, from 10-year-olds taking private lessons to immersion coding "bootcamps" for adults trying to make a career change.
Kirsten Wilson's insight:
Programming/Code... Answers the question whether or not learning code is essential.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Kirsten Wilson
Scoop.it!

Reframing Failure as Iteration Allows Students to Thrive

Reframing Failure as Iteration Allows Students to Thrive | Going Game Based with Learning | Scoop.it
At New York City's game-based learning school Quest to Learn, sixth graders take risks in the process of designing a Rube Goldberg machine, which enables more creativity, innovation, and engagement.
Kirsten Wilson's insight:
Risk-taking, resilience, and grit through Game based Learning.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Kirsten Wilson
Scoop.it!

SXSWedu: Are Legos the Next Edu Wave?Playfulness enters the classroom - Austin Chronicle

SXSWedu: Are Legos the Next Edu Wave?Playfulness enters the classroom - Austin Chronicle | Going Game Based with Learning | Scoop.it
Austin Chronicle SXSWedu: Are Legos the Next Edu Wave?
Kirsten Wilson's insight:
Legos and all other toys are making a comeback. Learning is fun!
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Kirsten Wilson
Scoop.it!

Game Based Learning | Kevin Corbett

Game Based Learning | Kevin Corbett | Going Game Based with Learning | Scoop.it
Kevin Corbett is an eLearning program and course developer along with online learning teacher trainer, with over 15 years experience. Passions include Mobile Learning (mlearning) and using Social media and Gamification to increase learning. Twitter @Kevin_Corbett
Kirsten Wilson's insight:

More videos and infographics regarding Gamification with Kevin Corbett.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Kirsten Wilson
Scoop.it!

GameBased Learning PD by Justin Riley

Kirsten Wilson's insight:

This PD slide show was shared by Justin Riley via #txeduchat March 2014 during a lively chat on the topic of Game Based Learning.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Kirsten Wilson
Scoop.it!

Sharon Boller's Learning Game Design Series, Part 4: Game Elements

Sharon Boller's Learning Game Design Series, Part 4: Game Elements | Going Game Based with Learning | Scoop.it
Part 4 of Sharon Boller's multi-part Learning Game Design Series. This post focuses on game elements such as conflict, strategy, competition and more.
Kirsten Wilson's insight:

Great insight into game design for those that are creating Game Based Learning classrooms.  Not a promotion of the products sold but the information/content in the blog is very beneficial.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Kirsten Wilson
Scoop.it!

GAMEUP | Argument Wars

GAMEUP | Argument Wars | Going Game Based with Learning | Scoop.it
Using this free online social studies game, students explore the American court system, trials, and other civics concepts. Watch as the Supreme Court comes to life!
Kirsten Wilson's insight:

Argument Wars free game on Brain Pop is a great way to engage students in persuasive writing and debate.

more...
No comment yet.