Gods, Omens, and Superstitions During Shakespeare's Times
286 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Nicole Malara
Scoop.it!

Common Superstitions

Common Superstitions | Gods, Omens, and Superstitions During Shakespeare's Times | Scoop.it
Nicole Malara's insight:

This image portrays a young woman living in a world of bad luck, according to the Elizabethans. Almost everything shown in the picture portrays a superstition that causes bad luck. These include the broken mirror, the spilled salt and pepper, walking under a ladder, having a black cat cross your path, stepping on a crack, opening an umbrella inside, and the number 13.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Nicole Malara
Scoop.it!

Photos: Top 13 superstitions to avoid

Photos: Top 13 superstitions to avoid | Gods, Omens, and Superstitions During Shakespeare's Times | Scoop.it
Bad luck, unfortunate occurrences and unfavorable outcomes, here are the top 13 superstitions that people try their hardest to be mindful of to avoid misfortune. Why take chances -- you would be wise to follow suit.
Nicole Malara's insight:

This article contains a list of today's beliefs (some more known than others).

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Nicole Malara
Scoop.it!

Beliefs and Superstitions of the Elizabethan Era

Hope this helps with any school projects or whatever. Check out this site for crheats on your school projects! It has this video on it and many others too! P....

Nicole Malara's insight:

This video explains a few of the superstitions of the Elizabethan era and explains how deep their impact is on the people.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Nicole Malara
Scoop.it!

Superstition, Folklore, and Astrology in Shakespeare's Time

Click here to edit the title

Nicole Malara's insight:

This article explains the different superstitions of the Elizabethan Era and how people adapted them. They did not rely on their individual knowledge and as a result believing the superstitions. Instead, they trusted the beliefs of their parents and elders.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Nicole Malara
Scoop.it!

Elizabethan Era Superstitions

Elizabethan Era Superstitions | Gods, Omens, and Superstitions During Shakespeare's Times | Scoop.it
The years that span from 1558 to 1603, Queen Elizabeth I's reign, are generally regarded by scholars as the Elizabethan Era. By most accounts this was an extremely prosperous time in England. The ...
Nicole Malara's insight:

This website talks about the omens and superstitions that people believed in during the Elizabethan times. These superstitions were part of the  people's everyday lives. The superstitions included: sneezing, plagues, spitting into fire, and etc. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Nicole Malara
Scoop.it!

Elizabethan Era Astrology And Beliefs

Elizabethan Era Astrology And Beliefs | Gods, Omens, and Superstitions During Shakespeare's Times | Scoop.it
Astrology: The study of the movements and relative positions of celestial bodies interpreted as having an influence on human affairs. Astronomy: The branch of science that deals with celestial...
Nicole Malara's insight:

This article shows how the people of the Elizabethan era believed that using astrology would show what kind of person one would grow up to be. They also believed in magic and even the priests believed in witches, fairies, and ghosts.  

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Nicole Malara
Scoop.it!

Salt and Pepper

Salt and Pepper | Gods, Omens, and Superstitions During Shakespeare's Times | Scoop.it
Nicole Malara's insight:

The image above shows pepper and salt. During the Elizabethan times, it was said that if you were to drop salt or pepper on the floor then you would recieve bad luck. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Nicole Malara
Scoop.it!

‘Superstition’ Still Relevant in Today’s Society

‘Superstition’ Still Relevant in Today’s Society | Gods, Omens, and Superstitions During Shakespeare's Times | Scoop.it
Nicole Malara's insight:

This article discusses how in today's society we still believe in the many different superstitions that were made up thousands of years ago. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Nicole Malara
Scoop.it!

Shakespeare's Allusions to Greek and Roman Gods

Nicole Malara's insight:

This article shows that Shakespeare, as well as the people living in Shakesperean times, were aware of the different Roman and Greek Gods. Otherwise, Shakespeare would not use them in his works because the people would not understand the allusions.

more...
No comment yet.