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We consume over 78 lb. of sugar and corn syrup a year in the US per person. Sugar consumption is too high and not healthy. Here are tips and recipes for healthy living and diet with Sugarlesse™.
Curated by Steve Kingsley
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Is sugar toxic? - New Zealand Herald

Is sugar toxic? - New Zealand Herald | Go Sugar Free Now | Scoop.it
Is sugar toxic? New Zealand Herald The mainstream health message is that if you reduce your calorie intake and up your exercise - if you burn more calories than you eat - you can avoid weight-gain, obesity and the metabolic diseases that travel...
Steve Kingsley's insight:

No food is toxic in moderation!

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Why the weight is so hard to shift: guidelines have been wrong all along - The Guardian

Why the weight is so hard to shift: guidelines have been wrong all along - The Guardian | Go Sugar Free Now | Scoop.it
The Guardian Why the weight is so hard to shift: guidelines have been wrong all along The Guardian National guidelines that advise people how to lose weight are seriously flawed and grossly overstate how quickly they will reach their targets,...
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Food Art: Who said you can’t play with food?

Food Art: Who said you can’t play with food? | Go Sugar Free Now | Scoop.it

It's not exactly clear where Penne alla Vodka comes from. Some say it's Italian... Ask The Food Lab


Via Edible News
Steve Kingsley's insight:

Don't think hungry or malnourished people would find this fun/funny!

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Edible News's curator insight, March 30, 2013 9:15 AM

Our weekly roundup on tasty news from around the world and here's what we are reading...

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Hot Chocolate 'Keeps Brain Healthy'

Hot Chocolate 'Keeps Brain Healthy' | Go Sugar Free Now | Scoop.it
Hot chocolate can help older people keep their brains healthy, research has shown. Two cups of cocoa a day boosted blood flow to the brain and improved the memories of volunteers with narrowed arteries.

Via CThompkins
Steve Kingsley's insight:

Forget wrinkling your nose - make the cake with Sugarlesse instead:  http://www.sugarlesse.com/5/post/2013/05/chocolate-cheesecake.html

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CThompkins's comment, August 14, 2013 11:01 AM
Thanks for the info Steve
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Eating lots of chocolate helps people stay thin, study finds - HealthPop - CBS News

Eating lots of chocolate helps people stay thin, study finds - HealthPop - CBS News | Go Sugar Free Now | Scoop.it
Eating chocolate frequently was associated with a a lower body mass index, study showed Read more by Ryan Jaslow on CBS News' HealthPop.

 

"(CBS News) What's the best way to stay thin? A new study finds it's exercising and eating a healthy diet full of - chocolate?

 

 

"The study found that people who frequently ate chocolate had a lower body mass index (BMI) than people who didn't."

 

{Now that's a study I can get behind with my big... yeah LOL.} 


Via Hal
Steve Kingsley's insight:

Those Aztecs really new a thing or two about healthy living - except for their bloody rituals...!

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Eleni Sideri's curator insight, March 10, 2013 2:59 PM

I would certainly choose this way to remain slim.

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Chocolate may help keep brain healthy, sharp in old age, study says

Chocolate may help keep brain healthy, sharp in old age, study says | Go Sugar Free Now | Scoop.it
Older chocoholics may have a new excuse to indulge their cravings: The dark stuff not only soothes the soul, but might also sharpen the mind.

Via Edible News
Steve Kingsley's insight:

What a great excuse!!!

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Hayesh Patoliya's comment, September 25, 2013 5:30 AM
Very nice and very good food for child..
Hayesh Patoliya's comment, September 25, 2013 5:30 AM
Very nice and very good food for child..http://shayari.org.in/
Hayesh Patoliya's comment, September 25, 2013 5:31 AM
http://smsjokes.org.in/
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Infographic: Coconut nectar, the most sustainable sweetener | Sweeteners content from New Hope 360

Infographic: Coconut nectar, the most sustainable sweetener | Sweeteners content from New Hope 360 | Go Sugar Free Now | Scoop.it
Demand for natural (and good-tasting sweeteners) is growing; which sweeteners are stepping up to the plate? Coconut nectar is one to watch. (Can you guess the most #sustainable sweetener?

Via Stephen Hinton
Steve Kingsley's insight:

Unfortunately the "coconutty" flavor of coconut sugar doesn't make it suitable for most applications, in my opinion. I tested it extensively.

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Agave - A Brief Overview of Its Origins and Future Growth

A huge and rapidly growing market The agave nectar industry is a growing market that has an estimated production of 3,000,000 gallons per year (Noel, 2008). This growth is fueled by the public’s growing awareness of the negative health aspects caused by using artificial sweeteners, refined sugars, and high fructose corn syrup. The market has responded by switching to alternative sweeteners that are natural and healthier: agave syrup, stevia, etc.

 

The ‘other alternative sweetener’ industry in the United States, which only includes fully-natural sweeteners (agave nectar, stevia), had annual retail sales of $38 million in 2008, estimated 2011 sales of $72 million, with projected annual revenue of $102 million in 2013 and $145 million in 2018 (Freedonia, 2009). The growth in the ‘other alternative sugar’ industry is due to the growing demand for organic food products, and consumer trends towards healthier eating.

   
Via Eric Stonecipher
Steve Kingsley's insight:

This is a good industry insight.

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Warning: Stevia Sweeteners May NOT Be as Natural as You Think | Fooducate

Warning: Stevia Sweeteners May NOT Be as Natural as You Think | Fooducate | Go Sugar Free Now | Scoop.it
Dieters in the US were introduced to stevia sweeteners just a few years ago, after they received the coveted GRAS (generally recognized as safe) status from

Via Meristemi
Steve Kingsley's insight:

There is so much confusion about even simple terms like "natural..."

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He Who Controls the Food: Is GMO Really Necessary to ‘Feed the World’? [Actually, World Population is FALLING]

He Who Controls the Food: Is GMO Really Necessary to ‘Feed the World’? [Actually, World Population is FALLING] | Go Sugar Free Now | Scoop.it
Truthstream Media - by Melissa Melton We are continuously inundated with the message that our world is overpopulated because humanity is reproducing at a rate much faster than the Earth’s resources...

Via #BBBundyBlog #NOMORELIES Tom Woods #Activist Award #Scoopiteer >20,000 Sources >250K Connections http://goo.gl/ruHO3Q
Steve Kingsley's insight:

Actually, the growth rate of the world's population is falling back to its historical half percent a year.

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Good mood foods: Some flavors in some foods resemble a prescription mood stabilizer

Good mood foods: Some flavors in some foods resemble a prescription mood stabilizer | Go Sugar Free Now | Scoop.it

New evidence reveals the possibility of mood-enhancing effects associated with some flavors, stemming at least in part from natural ingredients bearing a striking chemical similarity to valproic acid, a widely used prescription mood-stabilizing drug, scientists reported in Philadelphia. This effect joins those previously reported for chocolate, teas and some other known comfort foods.

 

They presented the study of more than 1,700 substances that make up the flavors of common foods at the 244th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society.

 

"Molecules in chocolate, a variety of berries and foods containing omega-3 fatty acids have shown positive effects on mood. In turn, our studies show that some commonly used flavor components are structurally similar to valproic acid," said Karina Martinez-Mayorga, Ph.D., leader of a research team that has been studying the effects of flavors on mood. She described research done while working at the Torrey Pines Institute for Molecular Studies, and now is with the

Chemistry Institute at the National Autonomous University of Mexico.

 

Sold under brand names that include Depakene, Depakote and Stavzor, valproic acid is used to smooth out the mood swings of people with manic-depressive disorder and related conditions.


Via Ashish Umre
Steve Kingsley's insight:

Seems to me the companies producing Depakene, Depakote, Stavzor, and similar products have mimicked nature, not the other way around.

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How To Make A Salad That Doesn't Suck: A Guide For The Nutritionally Unvirtuous

How To Make A Salad That Doesn't Suck: A Guide For The Nutritionally Unvirtuous | Go Sugar Free Now | Scoop.it

Even the more willing salad-eaters among us tend to think of salad as the culinary equivalent of floss, i.e. as a depressing incarnation of grim, miserable healthfulness wagging a finger of admonishment from the most boring sector of the table. At family functions, you scoop some onto your plate with the same shrugging resignation with which you put in your yearly appearance at a church service: Ah hell, better heap some of this crap on there so Grandma won't get on my case.

Hey, maybe if I dump half a bottle of ranch dressing on it, you think, brightening, then it'll be more like somebody just spilled a harmless fistful of lawn clippings into an otherwise delicious puddle of mayonnaise!

Friends, that's not what a salad is meant to be. A salad, well executed and embraced as an opportunity to stuff more things that are good into our bodies, should be a carnival of lively flavors, textures, and colors. It should excite your eyes, exercise your teeth, and make your palate sing with joy. You should stare at it intently while you eat, lustily mixing and matching its various ingredients on your fork; you should finish before you're ready to be done and then nudge your dumb salmon toward the edge of your plate to make room for more salad. It should be a glorious, indulgent feast: healthful, sure, yeah OK, but mostly delicious and diverse and fresh and ecstatic.


Via Ashish Umre
Steve Kingsley's insight:

Make them with REALLY fresh ingredients straight from your garden or nearby farm/market stands and they WILL BE delicious!

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History's weirdest fad diets

History's weirdest fad diets | Go Sugar Free Now | Scoop.it

As early as the Greeks and Romans people have been dieting. But while it was largely about health and fitness back then, it's the Victorians who really kick started the fad diet.

 

"The Greek word diatia, from which our word diet derives, described a whole way of life," says Louise Foxcroft, a historian and author of Calories and Corsets: A History of Dieting Over 2,000 Years.

 

"Dieting back then was about all-round mental and physical health. People really got a taste for fad dieting in the 19th Century. It is during this time that things tip over into dieting more for aesthetic reasons and the diet industry explodes."

 

So what are the weirdest and unhealthiest fad diets from history?


Via Ashish Umre
Steve Kingsley's insight:

And I thought today's fad diets were the weird and/or just plain stupid....

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Steve Kingsley's curator insight, September 12, 2013 5:55 PM

So today's fad diets have had plenty of weird and/or just plain stupid predecessors.... 

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How to Use Food as Part of a Healthy Weight Loss Program

How to Use Food as Part of a Healthy Weight Loss Program | Go Sugar Free Now | Scoop.it
It is understood that food is a large component of a healthy weight loss program. Healthy weight loss starts with making good food choices, and watching what you eat.
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Mining molecular gastronomy : Nature News & Comment

Mining molecular gastronomy : Nature News & Comment | Go Sugar Free Now | Scoop.it

Would you eat caviar and white chocolate in the same mouthful? The answer might depend on where in the world you live.

In North American and Western European cuisines, chefs tend to combine foods that share flavour compounds, so the more adventurous would serve up caviar and white chocolate, because they share trimethylamine, among other compounds. But Asian chefs work differently, according to work published today in Scientific Reports1 by theoretical physicist Sebastian Ahnert from the University of Cambridge, UK, and his colleagues.


Via Neelima Sinha
Steve Kingsley's insight:

20 some years ago practitioners of the art were called food scientists and made a decent living; today they are called "molecular gastronomists" doing the same thing and making a very good living. It's called "title inflation." As a serial food inventor I'm not jelaous, just sick and tired of the aggrandisement and cheapening of values and language.

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Ready for debut: Fruit-juice-infused chocolate with 50 percent less fat

Ready for debut: Fruit-juice-infused chocolate with 50 percent less fat | Go Sugar Free Now | Scoop.it
Already renowned as a healthy treat when enjoyed in moderation, chocolate could become even more salubrious if manufacturers embraced new technology for making “fruit-juice-infused chocolate,” a scientist says.

Via Cathryn Wellner
Steve Kingsley's insight:

Interesting new technology - will follow up on that!

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Cathryn Wellner's curator insight, April 8, 2013 8:59 AM

Good news for chocolate lovers!

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Dark Chocolate Really Is Healthy

Dark Chocolate Really Is Healthy | Go Sugar Free Now | Scoop.it

"In the photo above, you have a photo of two of our favorite things…chocolate and wine.  I’m not going to talk about the wine for now; that’s for another posting."


Via Community Village
Steve Kingsley's insight:

They beat me to it... always thought combining dark chocolate with red wine would be the perfect drink!

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Is White Chocolate Healthy?

Is White Chocolate Healthy? | Go Sugar Free Now | Scoop.it

White chocolate is not technically chocolate.

 

Chocolate and especially "dark chocolate contains more antioxidants and other compounds that can help lower blood pressure, improve insulin sensitivity and protect the health of blood vessels, as reported in the March 2009 issue of the journal of the American Heart Association, "Circulation."

Read more: http://www.livestrong.com/article/368816-is-white-chocolate-healthy/#ixzz1doNlvCra


Via Community Village
Steve Kingsley's insight:

That's correct. White chocolate is not chocolate, technically or othewise. Neither is it healthy.

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How to Determine the Best Alternative Natural Sweetener - Huffington Post

How to Determine the Best Alternative Natural Sweetener - Huffington Post | Go Sugar Free Now | Scoop.it
How to Determine the Best Alternative Natural Sweetener Huffington Post As people became more wary of them, manufacturers became savvy to the fake-sugar backlash and offered a variety of healthy natural sweeteners they claimed didn't raise your...

Via Dennis Tomlin
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PepsiCo CEO promises ‘disruptive’ innovation: Novel natural sweeteners, flavorings in the Cola

PepsiCo CEO promises ‘disruptive’ innovation: Novel natural sweeteners, flavorings in the Cola | Go Sugar Free Now | Scoop.it
PepsiCo says it is exploring novel natural sweeteners and flavorings that will bring “disruptive innovation” to the cola market.

Via PitchsideGroup
Steve Kingsley's insight:

Can't wait for disruptive innovation from Pepsi and its ilk!

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Aspartame has been Renamed and is Now Being Marketed as a Natural Sweetener

Aspartame has been Renamed and is Now Being Marketed as a Natural Sweetener | Go Sugar Free Now | Scoop.it
Share This Article Tweet Aspartame has been Renamed and is Now Being Marketed as a Natural Sweetener 5 out of 5 based on 1 ratings. Artificial sweeteners especially aspartame has gotten a bad rap o...

Via Kat Carroll
Steve Kingsley's insight:

The components - phenylalanine and aspartic acid - are natural. The combined product is not.

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Consumers Still Misled, Confused About Realities of Sugar Consumption

31 July 2013, PRNewswire, The Sugar Association -- "New Survey Shows Parents Continue to Prefer Natural Over Artificial Sweeteners/

Americans' consumption of sugar (sucrose) has decreased by 35 percent in the past 42 years according to the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), but the results of a recent poll show that most parents believe just the opposite.

 

The poll—conducted online by Harris Interactive on behalf of The Sugar Association—asked 478 parents of children under the age of 18, how they thought sugar consumption in the United States has changed over the past 40 years.

 

Despite the fact that is has decreased by 35 percent, 75 percent of those parents said they believe sugar consumption has increased in some way.

And that wasn't the only result inconsistent with reality.

 

"The confusion about food—what to eat and what not to eat—is constantly fueled by extremists who sensationalize each and every new piece of research and distort the facts about sugar for the sake of a story or to hype a new book," said Andrew Briscoe, CEO of the Sugar Association.

 

An overwhelming number of parents with children under the age of 18 also overestimated the number of calories in a teaspoon of sugar. 71 percent believe that there are 20 or more calories in one teaspoon, and almost 30 percent believe the caloric value is upwards of 100.

 

Only 7 percent answered correctly: There are only 15 calories in one teaspoon of sugar.

 

Approximately 85 percent of parents of children under the age of 18 believe that all-natural foods are better for you than those that contain artificial ingredients, and 86 percent stated that the type of sweetener used is at least somewhat important to them when deciding what foods and beverages to serve their kids.

Unfortunately, these same parents often find identifying these foods challenging, making them difficult to avoid. When asked which labels they used to help guide food purchases, only 45 percent said they looked at the ingredient statement, which is where they would be able to determine whether a food was made with natural vs. artificial ingredients and which type of sweetener was used.

 

These results are similar to those found in a previous survey, also conducted by Harris Interactive in 2010 on behalf of The Sugar Association, which showed that most parents of children under 18 in the United States try to avoid artificial sweeteners (52 percent), but were unable to identify common chemical sweeteners used by food manufacturers.

 

When shown the ingredient label from a common drink given to dehydrated infants in the 2010 poll, only four percent of those surveyed could identify the sweeteners used in the product, which included fructose, dextrose, sucralose and acesulfame potassium. 13 percent of those parents of children under 18 couldn't identify a single one.

 

"Food labels are there to help consumers make informed choices," Briscoe said.  "If the ingredient section looks like a laundry list of unknown elements, consumers aren't going to bother reading it."

 

The Sugar Association has petitioned the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to follow Canada's lead and set food label guidance that clearly identifies which ingredients are artificial sweeteners and how much of each are found in a product.

 

"Parents have a right to know what they are feeding their families," Briscoe said. "And the current labeling standards aren't working."

The petition has been pending with the FDA for eight years.


Via GR2
Steve Kingsley's insight:

Most of the consumers are not misled - the ones who could gain the most by reading the ingredient statement do not:

 

A) read it

 

B) can't comprehend it even if they read it

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Mediterranean diet enriched with olive oil may protect bone

Mediterranean diet enriched with olive oil may protect bone | Go Sugar Free Now | Scoop.it

A study to be published in the Endocrine Society’s Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism (JCEM) shows consumption of a Mediterranean diet enriched with olive oil for two years is associated with increased serum osteocalcin concentrations, suggesting a protective effect on bone.

 

Age-related bone mass loss and decreased bone strength affects women and men alike are an important determinant of osteoporosis and fracture risk. Studies have shown that the incidence of osteoporosis in Europe is lower in the Mediterranean basin. The traditional Mediterranean diet, rich in fruits and vegetables, with a high intake of olives and olive oil could be one of the environmental factors underlying this difference.

 

“The intake of olive oil has been related to the prevention of osteoporosis in experimental and in vitro models,” said José Manuel Fernández-Real, MD, PhD, of Hospital Dr. Josep Trueta in Girona, Spain and lead author of the study. “This is the first randomized study which demonstrates that olive oil preserves bone, at least as inferred by circulating bone markers, in humans.”

 

The participants in this study were 127 community-dwelling men aged 55 to 80 years randomly selected from one of the Prevencion con Dieta Mediterranea (PREDIMED) study centers who had at least two years of follow-up. The PREDIMED study is a large, parallel group, randomized, controlled trial aimed to assess the effect of the Mediterranean diet on the prevention of cardiovascular diseases.


Via Ashish Umre
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People who read food labels stay thinner, study finds

An international team of scientists headed from the University of Santiago de Compostela has found that reading the labels on food products is linked to obesity prevention, especially in women. According to the study which used data from the United States, female consumers who consult food labels weigh nearly 4 kilograms less.Along with the Universities of Tennessee, Arkansas (USA) and the Norwegian Institute for Agricultural Finance Research, the University of Santiago de Compostela has participated in a study on the relationship between reading the food label and obesity.

 

The results indicated that the body mass index of those consumers who read that label is 1.49 points lower than those who never consider such information when doing their food shopping. This translates as a reduction of 3.91 kg for an American woman measuring 1.62 cm and weighing 74 kg.

The data was taken from the annual National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) performed by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC -- http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nhis.htm). Some 25,640 observations were collected on health and eating and shopping habits. These included various questions on whether participants read the nutritional information in supermarkets and how often.


Via Ashish Umre
Steve Kingsley's insight:

One can argue about the "cause and effect" relationship here - but what really counts is the result, doesn't it?

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Sarah Westaway's curator insight, July 19, 2013 3:54 AM

Reading labels has shown to have a link with obesity prevention!

Steve Kingsley's curator insight, September 12, 2013 5:49 PM

We can and should have a debate about the "cause and effect" relationship here - but what really counts is the result, doesn't it?

Jamie Robins's curator insight, March 10, 12:32 AM

Is this true of all readers of labels or is there a marketing angle associated with these claims?

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Fructose has different effect than glucose on brain regions that regulate appetite

In a study examining possible factors regarding the associations between fructose consumption and weight gain, brain magnetic resonance imaging of study participants indicated that ingestion of glucose but not fructose reduced cerebral blood flow and activity in brain regions that regulate appetite, and ingestion of glucose but not fructose produced increased ratings of satiety and fullness, according to a preliminary study published in the January 2 issue of JAMA.


Via Ashish Umre
Steve Kingsley's insight:

Blood sugar IS glucose, so this should not be surprising, but common sense. 

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Steve Kingsley's curator insight, September 27, 2013 2:44 PM

Common sense... glucose IS blood sugar.