Go Sugar Free Now
380 views | +0 today
 
Rescooped by Steve Kingsley from Organic Farming
onto Go Sugar Free Now
Scoop.it!

Organics and Sustainability: Reflections on my New York Times Misquote

Organics and Sustainability: Reflections on my New York Times Misquote | Go Sugar Free Now | Scoop.it
a friend in New York City contacted me on New Year’s Eve to tell me I had been quoted in a front page story. It dealt with important questions about the sustainability of growing organic vegetables in the deserts of Mexico’s Baja peninsula.

 

 

Organics and Sustainability: Reflections on my New York Times Misquote

Posted Jan 24, 2012 by Michael Bomford

The phone rang as I was tying up loose ends for my last day in the office before Christmas. New York Times reporter Elisabeth Rosenthal wanted my thoughts on the sustainability of organic agriculture… a subject that I think about a lot. I gave her my cell phone number and asked her to call back.

She called again Saturday afternoon, as my kids and I returned home from Christmas shopping. I plunked them in front of a video and put her on speaker phone so that I could peel butternut squash for a solstice potluck that evening. We talked for a half hour or so, and she said she’d let me know when her story would run.

I didn’t hear back from her, but a friend in New York City contacted me on New Year’s Eve to tell me I had been quoted in a front page story. It dealt with important questions about the sustainability of growing organic vegetables in the deserts of Mexico’s Baja peninsula. Apparently it had legs. It was the most e-mailed story in the paper for much of the first week of 2012. It contained some of the ideas that I had discussed as I peeled squash, but only one direct quote from me. My heart sank as I read it:

Organic agriculture used to be sustainable agriculture, but now that is not always the case.

That’s not what I had said. It wasn’t even a statement I could agree with. Yet there it was, immortalized in America’s newspaper of record with my name attached to it.

I immediately fired off the following letter to the editor, which has not been published:

I disagree with the statement attributed to me that “organic agriculture used to be sustainable.” Most organic farms remain more sustainable than their conventional counterparts. If we must import produce from Mexico we should support the farmers there that grow it organically.

US produce imports from Mexico have almost tripled since 1990, driven by growing demand for inexpensive fruit and vegetables out-of-season. Most of this supply comes from conventional farms. Sourcing more of it from organic farms will not solve the important sustainability issues Rosenthal addresses, but it makes things better, not worse.

Despite growth in demand for organic products, less than 1% of farmland in the USA or Mexico is certified organic. Organic farms tend to use energy and water more efficiently than conventional farms. They pollute less. Organic farmers are often healthier, and better able to make a decent living from small, diversified farms, such as those that dominate Mexico’s organic sector. Supporting them promotes sustainability.

I have tried to reconstruct my conversation to figure out Rosenthal could have heard me say something I don’t believe. I was trying to explain that sustainability is not a black and white issue. Scientists disagree on how best to measure it, because it incorporates a broad range of environmental, economic and social considerations. When the term was coined by the Brundtland commission in 1987 it was defined as “meeting the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs.”

It’s an ambitious goal, seldom truly achieved. We live in a world where almost a billion people live in hunger, even as we exhaust the reserves of fossil fuels and other non-renewable resources on which we increasingly depend. We spew carbon, pollute our groundwater with nitrogen and our surface water with phosphorus, and melt the ice at the same poles where our persistent pesticides accumulate. We are failing to meet the needs of the present, even as we compromise the ability of future generations to meet their own needs.

Our current way of living is clearly unsustainable, and the food system that supports it can’t be sustained indefinitely either. This concerned Sir Albert Howard, the father of organic agriculture in the west. Seventy years ago Howard was fascinated by the fall of civilizations, which he saw as an inevitable result of unsustainable food systems. He looked to the agriculture of long persistent civilizations – like China and India – for examples of ways to feed ourselves sustainably. The “practices of the Orient” that he held up as examples were built on a foundation of small, diverse, labor-intensive farms integrating animal and crop production. Few inputs were needed because resources were recycled on the farm by composting, to build soils rich in organic matter that retained water and nutrients. “Organic farming” evolved into a shorthand description for the type of agriculture that Howard advocated. The term “sustainable agriculture” showed up years later, and often incorporated similar concepts and ideas.

For many years, organic agriculture – like sustainable agriculture – was defined by principles, rather than specific practices. In his 1981 essay, Solving for Pattern, Wendell Berry called for solutions that solve multiple problems without creating new ones. He used an organic farm as an example, saying that it

is not one that uses certain methods and substances and avoids others; it is a farm whose structure is formed in imitation of the structure of a natural system; it has the integrity, the independence, and the benign dependence of an organism.

Berry concluded on a note of caution:

But we must not forget that those human solutions that we may call organic are not natural. We are talking about organic artifacts, organic only by imitation or analogy. Our ability to make such artifacts depends on virtues that are specifically human: [...] A good solution, then, must be in harmony with good character, cultural value, and moral law.

Organic agriculture,to Berry, was a human attempt at moral agriculture. And people have been known to disagree on questions of morality. While a growing cadre of farmers and eaters found inspiration in Howard, Berry, and other eloquent pioneers of organic agriculture, each had a different interpretation of what actually constituted organic farming. Money complicated things further. Growing consumer demand and premium prices for organic products motivated questionable labeling of “organic” food from farms that clearly violated organic principles. People who bought organic food weren’t always getting what they thought they were buying.

In response, organic certifiers began to emerge. They developed sets of organic standards, identifying acceptable practices based on principles, philosophy and ideals of organic agriculture. Most prohibited the use of synthetic fertilizers or pesticides, for example. Organic certification remained voluntary, however, and different certification agencies had different standards. A person who bought a certified organic product from Kentucky could get something grown in a way that would not be allowed by certifiers in Oregon.

Beginning in 1990, the USDA began to develop a single national standard for organic agriculture. The controversial process took more than a decade, but national organic standards became legally enforceable in 2002. They dictated what methods and substances were allowed for use on organic farms, and they made organic certification mandatory.

Organic agriculture had gone from being a fuzzy concept, based on high ideals but open to dramatically different interpretations in practice, to being a clearly defined set of practices. National organic standards drew a line in the sand, transforming shades of grey into black and white, organic and not organic. A colleague of mine compares being an organic farmer to being pregnant… you either are or you aren’t. There’s no part-way about it.

Sustainable agriculture, meanwhile, remains open to all sorts of different interpretations. Systems and practices can be more or less sustainable. When somebody tells me they don’t farm organically but they farm sustainably I have to ask what they mean by that. Everybody means something different. Even when people agree on the goals of sustainability, they can disagree on how best to accomplish those goals, or measure progress toward them.

This is what I tried to explain to the New York Times reporter as I prepared my squash. Organic agriculture and sustainable agriculture are based on similar principles. They both used to be fuzzy ideas, but that is no longer the case for organic agriculture, which became more cut-and-dried with the introduction of national organic standards. Apparently she heard me say that organic agriculture used to be sustainable, but isn’t always anymore.

This bothers me, because it suggests that I think there was a golden age of sustainable organic agriculture, which is now behind us. The New York Times story uses me to bolster its thesis that growth of the organic sector is compromising sustainability. In fact, I think it’s the other way around: Each farm that transitions to organic agriculture makes our food system a little more sustainable. Choosing an organic product over a similar conventional product is a vote for sustainability.

The New York Times article deals specifically with the problem of aquifer depletion beneath the deserts of Mexico’s Baja peninsula. Conventional agriculture is responsible for most freshwater use globally, and must shoulder much of the blame for the fact that aquifers the world over are being drained faster than they are recharged. This is clearly unsustainable. It’s happening in Mexico, but it’s also happening in California, the Midwestern US, India, China, and the Middle East. Just about every country growing irrigated grain is depleting aquifers to do it.

Groundwater depletion in the regions of the U.S.A., Europe, China and India and the Middle East for the year 2000 (mm/year; clockwise from top‐left). From Wada et al., 2010 (Click image to go to source).

Since some of the farms in the Baja Peninsula are organic, the problem is presented as an example of growth in the organic sector promoting unsustainable practices. Ironically, the UN Food and Agriculture Organization recently released a report called Sustainable Options for Addressing Land and Water Problems that identifies organic farming as part of the solution to such problems. Organic standards don’t regulate irrigation methods or acceptable water sources, but they do promote practices that improve water use efficiency, build soils that retain water, and reduce pollution of remaining water resources. The Mexican organic vegetable farms highlighted in the article happen to use trickle irrigation, which uses up to 75% less water than sprinkler or flood irrigation systems. They aren’t required to do so by organic standards, but the fact that the farmers can fetch a premium for their organic produce may have allowed them to invest in more sustainable technology. Michael O’Gorman, who used to manage an organic farm in Mexico, describes the irrigation practices used by organic farmers in the Baja peninsula as “some of the most inventive and advanced water saving systems in the world.”

O’Gorman offers his own perspective on the particular farms highlighted in the New York Times article:

The group doing all of Del Cabo’s production in the southern end of the peninsula is one of the oldest grower-owned organic cooperatives in the world. It is owned by the same 151 families (average acreage less than 10) that were given ownership by organic farming pioneers in the early 1980s. It was started, and remains, as a social enterprise to give Mexican farmers a dignified alternative to waiting on tables and cleaning any of the nearly 500,000 luxiorious hotel rooms that American and European tourists inhabit daily[...] In fact the reason why organics developed in this part of Mexico is because the big conventional growers had no interest in the small fields that were owned by Mexican families. Del Cabo growers are religious about organics.

Americans like tomatoes. We eat — and import — more of them every year. In 1981 the average American consumed about a pound of tomatoes each month, of which just 3 ounces were imported. Today the average American eats more than a pound and a half of tomatoes monthly, and a half pound of that is imported, mostly from Mexico. Even our American-grown tomatoes are mostly tended by farm laborers from Mexico and other Latin American countries, who often work in indentured servitude to bring us cheap fruit. The brutal environmental and social costs of America’s conventional tomato industry are detailed in Tomatoland (2011), by award-winning investigative journalist Barry Estabrook:

Fields are sprayed with more than one hundred different herbicides and pesticides. Tomatoes are picked hard and green and artificially gassed until their skins acquire a marketable hue. Modern plant breeding has tripled yields, but has also produced fruits with dramatically reduced amounts of calcium, vitamin A, and vitamin C, and tomatoes that have fourteen times more sodium than the tomatoes our parents enjoyed. The relentless drive for low costs has fostered a thriving modern-day slave trade in the United States.

Those who tend our crops suffer the health effects of direct exposure to herbicides, insecticides, fungicides, and fumigants, whether they are in Mexico or the USA. In the 1990s a team of anthropologists led by Elizabeth Guilette studied effects of pesticides on children from farming families in the Yaqui valley and foothills of northwestern Mexico. Families in the valley used conventional farming practices with numerous pesticide applications; those in the foothills practiced traditional farming without pesticides. Children from conventional farming families in the valley had much poorer motor skills, less endurance, and worse memory than those who grew up in the foothills without pesticides. Evidence of the effects Guilette and her team observed included representative drawings by her four year-old subjects:

Representative drawings of a person by 4-year-old Yaqui children from the valley and foothills of Sonora, Mexico (Guillette, 1998. Click image to go to source). Valley children are exposed to pesticides; those in the foothills are not.

As a father of young children, I find these images heartbreaking. I want to be able to choose healthy foods for my kids without hurting other kids in the process. Thankfully, I can grow my own tomatoes, or rely on local farmers to grow tomatoes for me using low-input season extension technology, for about half the year. If I must have fresh tomatoes in January then I can choose organic to support farmers — wherever they are — who step off the pesticide treadmill. This won’t fix all of the problems of our industrial food system, but it can make it a little more sustainable.

Originally published at Organic Kentucky

 

 


Via Giri Kumar
Steve Kingsley's insight:

Organic farmers, in general, are much better at utilizing sustainable technologies and practices - which unfortunately price their products out of the mass markets.

more...
Steve Kingsley's curator insight, July 20, 2013 8:34 PM

Organic farmers, in general, are much better at utilizing sustainable technologies and practices - which unfortunately price their products out of the mass markets.

Go Sugar Free Now
We consume over 78 lb. of sugar and corn syrup a year in the US per person. Sugar consumption is too high and not healthy. Here are tips and recipes for healthy living and diet with Sugarlesse™.
Curated by Steve Kingsley
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Steve Kingsley
Scoop.it!

7 Healthy Reasons To Enjoy Chocolate--Without the Guilt!

7 Healthy Reasons To Enjoy Chocolate--Without the Guilt! | Go Sugar Free Now | Scoop.it
It might not be much of a surprise when we read about how eating broccoli can lower the risk of certain cancers, or how loaded with antioxidants fruits and vegetables are.
Steve Kingsley's insight:

Especially when it will be made with Sugarlesse™!

more...
No comment yet.
Suggested by Zana Cogelja
Scoop.it!

5 Health Problems That Lemonade Can Successfully Resolve

5 Health Problems That Lemonade Can Successfully Resolve | Go Sugar Free Now | Scoop.it
Many people consider the lemon as one of the healthiest ingredients in the world, primarily due to the large amount of the magical vitamin C, and other nut
Steve Kingsley's insight:

Especially if sweetened with SUGARLESSe:  http://sugarlesse.com

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Steve Kingsley
Scoop.it!

Happy 23rd and many, many more, Ben!

Happy 23rd and many, many more, Ben! | Go Sugar Free Now | Scoop.it
As a personal friend and marketing partner, Ben has always done what he does best:  Be true to his word; be generous; be creative - very creative, to be precise, and of course productive.  Also,...
Steve Kingsley's insight:

Live it up, Ben, the healthy way!

more...
No comment yet.
Suggested by Dave Meinstein
Scoop.it!

Low carb fast food - dieting with minimal compromise - Fast Food Life

Low carb fast food - dieting with minimal compromise - Fast Food Life | Go Sugar Free Now | Scoop.it
Low carb fast food doesn't need to be made specifically, find out ways to make favorite meals low carb without having to sacrifice what you love to eat.
Steve Kingsley's insight:

Don't know that "fast food" aspect of making your own low card food, but it is always preferable to buying it!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Steve Kingsley
Scoop.it!

Happy Bat Mitzvah, Joelle - Mazel Tov!

Happy Bat Mitzvah, Joelle - Mazel Tov! | Go Sugar Free Now | Scoop.it
Lori Weintrob,  chair and professor in the history department of Wagner College on Staten Island, NY had a problem. She wanted custom chocolate made for Joelle's Mat Mitzvah. Not just any  custom...
Steve Kingsley's insight:

Personalized sugar-free chocolates from:  http://www.sugarlesse.com/store/c3/SUGARLESSe™__Chocolate_Naturals.html

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Steve Kingsley from Healthy Recipes and Tips for Healthy Living
Scoop.it!

Top 5 Tips for Kicking Your Sugar Habit

Top 5 Tips for Kicking Your Sugar Habit | Go Sugar Free Now | Scoop.it
Sugar is one of the most addictive and worst stuffs in the latest diet. On the other hand, it’s one of the most loved tastes on earth.

Via Katy Reeve, Steve Kingsley
Steve Kingsley's insight:

I agree with Recommendations #1 and #2:  “Go natural” and “Seek for alternatives.” Here it is: http://sugarlesse.com

more...
Steve Kingsley's curator insight, December 3, 2013 8:47 PM

I agree with Recommendations #1 and #2:  “Go natural” and “Seek for alternatives.” Here it is: http://sugarlesse.com

Sandy Spencer's curator insight, January 30, 2014 10:09 AM

If all our sugar comsuption came in these cute little white cubes, it would be easy to stop. But many items have sugar as a hidden indredient and we eat much more than we know.

Rescooped by Steve Kingsley from Natural Wellness & Health
Scoop.it!

Chocolate Better for Your Teeth Than Fluoride

Chocolate Better for Your Teeth Than Fluoride | Go Sugar Free Now | Scoop.it
Toothpaste that contains the naturally-occurring cacao extract theobromine was more effective at repairing and re-mineralizing exposed dentin (the tissue that makes up the bulk of your teeth below the enamel) than fluoride toothpaste.

Via Amy Rouse
Steve Kingsley's insight:

All right...  chocolate sounds better than the cacao extract theobromine, which was used in this study. I'm all for replacing fuoride with  theobromine, though.

more...
Amy Rouse's curator insight, November 25, 2013 8:45 PM

If you are still using fluoride or even worse, your kids get near it, please read this article! "Fluoride is a toxic industrial waste product that is a poison to your body even in trace amounts, yet it is added to the majority of US water supplies using the rationale that it helps prevent dental cavities."

The 

"

Steve Kingsley's curator insight, November 25, 2013 9:17 PM

All right...  chocolate sounds better than the cacao extract theobromine, which was used in this study. I'm all for replacing fuoride with  theobromine, though.

Rescooped by Steve Kingsley from Healthy Food Tips & Tricks
Scoop.it!

Quick and Easy Brown Bag Lunches for Healthy Nutrition

Quick and Easy Brown Bag Lunches for Healthy Nutrition | Go Sugar Free Now | Scoop.it
By Jim Taylor What is the most important thing for us busy office-working people when the clock says “lunch”?

Via Linda Ward
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Steve Kingsley from Health and Nutrition
Scoop.it!

Top 5 Supplements to Supercharge Fat Burning - Natural News Blogs

Top 5 Supplements to Supercharge Fat Burning - Natural News Blogs | Go Sugar Free Now | Scoop.it
Getting rid of body fat can be a long process. You might be eating right and exercise, but the body fat is just not coming off quickly enough.

Via The BioSync Team
Steve Kingsley's insight:

I take 300mg of L-carnitine, 1g Omega 3, 0.5g Omega and 6,5g Omega 9, the latter tree mostly from flaxseed.

more...
The BioSync Team's curator insight, November 24, 2013 11:41 AM

Not sure you will get abs like this but the 5 supplements are a good foundation to an already healthy and active lifestyle.


Read more ...

Rescooped by Steve Kingsley from healthcare technology
Scoop.it!

mHealth - A checkup on consumer use

mHealth - A checkup on consumer use | Go Sugar Free Now | Scoop.it

from http://rockhealth.com/2013/11/visual-wednesdays-mhealth-checkup-consumer-use/


Via nrip
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Steve Kingsley from News You Can Use - NO PINKSLIME
Scoop.it!

Belgian doctors discover previously unknown body part, proving how little is truly known about the human body

Belgian doctors discover previously unknown body part, proving how little is truly known about the human body | Go Sugar Free Now | Scoop.it
Belgian doctors discover previously unknown body part, proving how little is truly known about the human body

Via #BBBundyBlog #NOMORELIES Tom Woods #Activist Award #Scoopiteer >20,000 Sources >250K Connections http://goo.gl/ruHO3Q
Steve Kingsley's insight:

An article from 1879 by a long-deceased French surgeon, Paul Segond, gave the Belgian doctors "fresh insight." Distressing state of affairs, isn't it?

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Steve Kingsley
Scoop.it!

Cranberry Royale for Thanksgiving

Cranberry Royale for Thanksgiving | Go Sugar Free Now | Scoop.it
This mouth-watering cranberry dish is light, bright and refreshing. No one would believe it isn’t made with sugar. SUGARLESSe™ completely neutralizes the inherent sourness of the berries while...
Steve Kingsley's insight:

A perfect dish, sauce, even dessert for a sugar-free Thanksgiving! Here is to all of ypu to have a happy one!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Steve Kingsley
Scoop.it!

Mexico Approves Junk Food Tax - Business Insider

Mexico Approves Junk Food Tax - Business Insider | Go Sugar Free Now | Scoop.it
Business Insider
Mexico Approves Junk Food Tax
Business Insider
Mexico's lower house of Congress is following in the steps of New York Mayor Bloomberg by recently approving new taxes on junk food in an effort to reduce their consumption.
Steve Kingsley's insight:

Who decides what food is designated junk and what isn't?

more...
Steve Kingsley's curator insight, October 20, 2013 8:35 PM

Who decides what food is designated junk and what isn't?

Scooped by Steve Kingsley
Scoop.it!

Innovation Open - Vote | SB'15 San Diego

Innovation Open - Vote | SB'15 San Diego | Go Sugar Free Now | Scoop.it
Vote for who you want to see win a place in the SB'15 San Diego Innovation Open finals. Competition that catalyzes the progress and impact of the next generation of better brands by featuring the startups who can contribute to a flourishing future economically, socially and environmentally if given the right support and exposure.
Steve Kingsley's insight:

InstaShake - Make Your Instant Drink Instantly with our new  21st century self-dissolving eco-friendly packaging - Vote for it! http://events.sustainablebrands.com/sb15sd/innovation-open/vote#d064b3f5f23348516c23cf700f029cf4

 

InstaShake™ is a powdered drink and supplement preparation system that enables you to “Make Your Instant Drink Instantly."

 

Aren’t you sick and tired of the mess you end up generating, while making your “instant” drink of protein powder, energy supplement, probiotic blend, vanilla shake, milk, chocolate milk, etc?

 

Aren’t they inconvenient to measure out, easy to spill while pouring into a cup or blender, hard to dissolve, and a pain to clean up afterwards?

 

And it’s not much better with pre-measured pouches either - they spill easily when opening, and you’re left with a pouch to dispose too, don’t you?

 

NO LONGER, with our new InstaShake™ system.

 

BUT HOW DOES IT WORK?

 

It’s easy. Instant. Fun too!

 

1. Remove the top and put 1 pouch for 8 oz instant drink into the shaker, or 2 pouches for 16 ounces. 

 

2. Next, fill it with cold or hot water to the 8 or 16 oz mark. Insert the mixer disk and screw the top on tight.

 

3. Shake till there is no residue left at the bottom or longer - it’s magical to watch as the pouch disappears!

 

4. Drink straight from the shaker or pour into cups. Either way, enjoy!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Steve Kingsley
Scoop.it!

Sugar-free Pina Colada Fruit Salad Recipe - Key Ingredient

Sugar-free Pina Colada Fruit Salad Recipe - Key Ingredient | Go Sugar Free Now | Scoop.it
This delicious salad is a snap to prepare. It is healthy, reduced calorie, and diabetic friendly, as it is made with SUGARLESSe™. Just spoon into ...
Steve Kingsley's insight:

Chill it well and enjoy!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Steve Kingsley
Scoop.it!

The Blood Sugar Solution Cookbook: More than 175 Ultra-Tasty Recipes for Total Health and Weight Loss | The #1 Store for Kindle eBooks!

The Blood Sugar Solution Cookbook: More than 175 Ultra-Tasty Recipes for Total Health and Weight Loss | The #1 Store for Kindle eBooks! | Go Sugar Free Now | Scoop.it
The Blood Sugar Solution Cookbook: More than 175 Ultra-Tasty Recipes for Total Health and... http://t.co/hPOSQhejOh
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Steve Kingsley
Scoop.it!

SUGARLESSe™ Endorsed by Gluten Free Advocacy Group

SUGARLESSe™ Endorsed by Gluten Free Advocacy Group | Go Sugar Free Now | Scoop.it
We received an email earlier this week with the following review and endorsement — after a thorough evaluation in a good number of recipes — from Lauren Lindsay of the Gluten-Free Advocacy Group...
Steve Kingsley's insight:

Gluten free should not mean, and does not mean fun free with SUGARLEsse!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Steve Kingsley
Scoop.it!

Roasted Almond Bark with SUGARLESSe™

Roasted Almond Bark with SUGARLESSe™ | Go Sugar Free Now | Scoop.it
Roasted almonds in chocolate — that is, almond bark — is one of the few confectionery delights that used to be allowed in our house under the guise of “almonds being healthy, thus good for...
Steve Kingsley's insight:

Now I can again enjoy my favorite treat with no sugar, yet the same sweetness... you can't get healthier than that!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Steve Kingsley
Scoop.it!

15 Ways To Detox Your Home & Your Life

15 Ways To Detox Your Home & Your Life | Go Sugar Free Now | Scoop.it
There are around 100,000 synthetic chemicals available on the market today, in everything from shampoo to cleaning products, toys to baby bottles, furniture, carpet and even clothes.
Steve Kingsley's insight:

Some of the ways are not really practical for most of us, such as making your own skin care and home cleaning products.

more...
Steve Kingsley's curator insight, November 25, 2013 10:28 PM

Some of the ways are not really practical for most of us, such as making your own skin care and home cleaning products.

Rescooped by Steve Kingsley from Green Consumer Forum
Scoop.it!

74-Year-Old with Weeks to Live Beats Cancer with Wheatgrass ("grass of life - new superfood")

74-Year-Old with Weeks to Live Beats Cancer with Wheatgrass ("grass of life - new superfood") | Go Sugar Free Now | Scoop.it
This story is about a 74 year old man with stomach cancer, and how he ignored toxic chemotherapy only to overcome his disease with wheatgrass.

Danny refused the chemotherapy, even if it made the doctors furious. Instead, he decided to go with a natural, nutritional approach. He remembered hearing about the healing properties of wheatgrass from a friend years earlier, and the more he thought about it and researched it, the more convinced he became that this could be a solution. Using decades of acquired skill in farming and tending to land, Danny went back to his farm to grow tons of wheatgrass.

“I didn’t know what to expect, but I was determined to give it a go,” recalls Danny. “Within seven days the burning sensation I had in my side was gone and I was beginning to feel a lot better. I stopped taking the tablets which had been prescribed and I haven’t taken one since. A month later the pain had completely disappeared and I knew I was on the mend. The wheatgrass was working. I had made the right decision to reject the advice of the doctors.”

Four years later, Danny is alive, healthy, and cancer-free. More than 2,600 people have beaten a path to Danny McDonald’s farmhouse to discover how he utilized something as simple as wheatgrass to beat cancer.


Via Bert Guevara
Steve Kingsley's insight:

There are more and more stories about how people utilize mega-doses of natural substances to wipe out cancer and other diseases....
 

more...
Steve Kingsley's curator insight, November 25, 2013 9:18 PM

There are more and more stories about how people utilize mega-doses of natural substances to wipe out cancer and other diseases....

Rescooped by Steve Kingsley from Longevity science
Scoop.it!

Ultrasound pulses could replace daily injections for diabetics

Ultrasound pulses could replace daily injections for diabetics | Go Sugar Free Now | Scoop.it

There could be hope for diabetics who are tired of giving themselves insulin injections on a daily basis. Researchers at North Carolina State University and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill are developing a system in which a single injection of nanoparticles could deliver insulin internally for days at a time – with a little help from pulses of ultrasound.

 

The biocompatible and biodegradable nanoparticles are made of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid), and contain a payload of insulin. Each particle has either a positively-charged chitosan coating, or a negatively-charged alginate coating. When the two types of particles are mixed together, these oppositely-charged coatings cause them to be drawn to each other by electrostatic force.

 

 


Via Ray and Terry's
Steve Kingsley's insight:

Seems to me this technology could/will be used for a host of other treatments....

more...
Joseph Perrone's comment, January 12, 2014 12:35 PM
Researchers in north Carolina are developing a way to help people with diabetes. so instead of giving insulin shots every day they are working on a way to use one shot and use that for days on end with the use of ultrasounds. This will make it much easier on the people who take the shots every single day. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I really think that this will be very useful to the diabetics! sounds much better that giving yourself a shot everyday! Must be painful to do that stuff. Good artical!
Taylor Marie Price's comment, February 5, 2014 5:18 PM
UNC and NC State students are trying to develop a way for diabetics to receive their insulin without daily injections. The plan is for nanoparticles to carry a payload of insulin to last a few days...................................As a diabetic I think it is a great idea and would be absolutely AMAZING!!! Even though I'm currently on a insulin pump which allows less shots it would even better if I had something that worked in the way the nanoparticles would work so it would allow me to not have to worry about forgetting as often or having to stress about giving my insulin to myself.
Madison Punch's comment, April 13, 2014 2:36 PM
It's so cool to know that in my home state, students are trying to improve treatment mediums for diabetics. It's a tough thing to deal with and to control and it's rad that more ways to accommodate the disease.
Rescooped by Steve Kingsley from Making POSITIVE Lifestyle Changes
Scoop.it!

Reduce Stress with Mindfulness

Reduce Stress with Mindfulness | Go Sugar Free Now | Scoop.it
Maria Gonzalez, author of "Mindful Leadership," explains how to minimize stress – not just manage it. Contains a brief guided breathing exercise.

Via noellyons.com
Steve Kingsley's insight:

The guided breathing exercise really works for me!

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Steve Kingsley from FOOD? HEALTH? DISEASE? NATURAL CURES???
Scoop.it!

Herbal Home Remedies and Supplements You've Never Heard Of

Herbal Home Remedies and Supplements You've Never Heard Of | Go Sugar Free Now | Scoop.it
There are many popular home remedies on the market today, from Vitamin D for depression in the wintertime to Vitamin C for the common cold. Many of these natural cures work very well, and deserve their place in many medicine cabinets.

Via Troy Mccomas (troy48)
Steve Kingsley's insight:

Must say this is the first time I've read about these herbal remedies.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Steve Kingsley from Juliette Scooper
Scoop.it!

Find Out How To Successfully Lose Weight

Do you want to lose weight? Is the thought of weight loss scary and distressing? In the past, have you attempted to shed those pounds, but gave up? These tips may assist you to lose weight. Keep reading for some tips to start losing weight and stay healthy. A great way to lose some pounds is to only wear tight fitting clothing. Heavy individuals often wear shapeless clothing to disguise their figures and feel more at ease. By avoiding loose-fitting clothes, you'll stay aware of how much you weigh. When your primary exercise goal is losing weight, you should consider cardiovascular exercise more important than weight training. Cardio training is important for burning fat and losing weight, whereas weight training helps to tone and maintain muscle mass. To lose weight, elevating your heart rate and respiration are more helpful than building muscle mass. Beginning a cardiovascular regimen is helpful for weight loss. Called "cardio", cardiovascular exercise includes running, speed walking, biking and a lot of other activities that increase your heart rate. You will burn the most fat when you elevate your heart rate and keep it elevated for at least 15 minutes. Aim for at least half an hour of cardio exercise most days of the week. Try to get rid of one pound every seven days. Losing more than one pound per week sounds nice, but it isn't ideal. Losing weight quickly can harm your healthy and usually results in gaining it back just as fast. Even while you are dieting, you end up treating yourself to a restaurant meal. Many restaurants serve twice as much food as necessary. Ask the server to bring a to-go box along with your food, and immediately divide your meal into two parts -- half for now, half for another meal. Not only will you limit your calories, but you will have a great lunch the next day. Now that you've come to the end of this article, you know what must be done to lose weight. Use what you learned here to lose weight and keep it off.


Via Juliette150
Steve Kingsley's insight:

As the Beyond Diet program is all about following and maintaining a healthy diet, it most likely has a much better chance to succeed.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Steve Kingsley from The 5 Chambers Of Fitness
Scoop.it!

Health Myth: Can Alcohol Help You Build Muscle and Lose Weight?

Health Myth: Can Alcohol Help You Build Muscle and Lose Weight? | Go Sugar Free Now | Scoop.it
According to a 2011 study published in The Archives of Internal Medicine, moderate drinkers tend to be thinner than teetotalers. Why? Ethanol—whether it's in wine, on the rocks, or in a pilsner glass—improves your body's response to the hormone insulin, which regulates blood sugar. Keep your blood sugar in check and you can prevent your body from shuttling glucose straight into your fat cells. One Harvard School of Public Health study even found that having one to two alcoholic drinks a day can reduce your risk of diabetes by 36 percent.
Plus, by increasing your heart rate, alcohol actually fires up your fat burners for about an hour after you take your last sip, according to Eric Rimm, an associate professor of epidemiology and nutrition at Harvard Medical School and chairman of the 2010 review of alcohol in the federal dietary guidelines. One recent study from Japan even suggests that if you're a microbrew man, your post-drink metabolic boost might last a little longer. Why? The naturally occurring flavonoids in beer's hops can increase muscle mass. And as you know, more muscles equal a faster metabolism—not to mention a chiseled bod.
Read more: http://bit.ly/19ZM0xx
Via The WolfPack Media Group
more...
Ross MacPhee's curator insight, October 20, 2013 9:47 AM

Let's hope so! 

Ross MacPhee's curator insight, October 20, 2013 10:08 AM

Let's hope so!

Scooped by Steve Kingsley
Scoop.it!

Broccoli Compound DIM Could Protect Healthy Tissues During Radiation ... - Huffington Post

Broccoli Compound DIM Could Protect Healthy Tissues During Radiation ... - Huffington Post | Go Sugar Free Now | Scoop.it
Broccoli Compound DIM Could Protect Healthy Tissues During Radiation ...
Huffington Post
A compound that comes from broccoli and cabbage could help protect healthy tissue from radiation during cancer treatment, a new study in animals suggests.
more...
No comment yet.