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Picture quiz – do you know your world cities?

Picture quiz – do you know your world cities? | Go Geo | Scoop.it
Some city skylines are so iconic they are instantly recognisable.

Via Seth Dixon
Mary Patrick Schoettinger's insight:

I definately need to get out more! Good excuse for travel!

 

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harish magan's comment, September 10, 2013 7:09 AM
It is very interesting to explore new cities and their sky views
Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 12, 2013 12:41 PM

After taking this quiz I realized I could not really identify most of these cities. I could tell some of them were European from the look of the buildings. I also thought a few more were cities in the United States but there was only Dallas. In my opinion these cities are even more spectacular than some of our major cities. 

Lorettayoung's curator insight, May 8, 8:36 PM

is this ularu ?

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The problem with higher education? Parents - Dallas Morning News

The problem with higher education? Parents - Dallas Morning News | Go Geo | Scoop.it
Dallas Morning News
The problem with higher education?
Mary Patrick Schoettinger's insight:

I think some of the statements made in the article are controversial, there is no doubt parents have taken on a much larger roll in curriculum.

 

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Take This State And Shove It: The New Secession Movement

Take This State And Shove It: The New Secession Movement | Go Geo | Scoop.it
Residents of rural areas feel shut out of their states' politics, so why not create their own?

Via Seth Dixon
Mary Patrick Schoettinger's insight:

These conversations seem to be the new normal. Groups of voters feel disenfranchised by their geography (urban vus suburban vs

rural). How much does gerrymandering play into defined districting? Is there truly a "fair" districting procedure?

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Heather Ramsey's curator insight, November 18, 2013 2:25 PM

On election day this year, several Colorado counties voted on whether to secede from Colorado and create a new state. Many of the counties voted in favor of the idea. (See the link below for more info on the Colorado secession movement.) This is not the first time groups of Americans have considered (and voted on) breaking away from their state. When political issues come up and decisions are made by the government and/or the people, some get their way and others do not. The article explains one way that some people have decided to take action when they do not feel their interests are being served.

 

BONUS for my students:

1) What steps do you think should be taken before people consider seceding from their state?  

2) What are some possible pros and cons of breaking away from a state to create a new one?  

3) Hypothetically speaking, what would it take for you to want to create a new state?

 

Here is the link to the article about Colorado's secession movement:

http://abcnews.go.com/Politics/wireStory/colorado-rural-voters-approve-secession-idea-20850962

Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 11, 2013 11:43 PM

Some states urban and rural areas have had differences and beliefs when it comes to politics. For example Virginia and West Virginia have had their differences and this is what has caused them to seperate. If every state did this there would be too much craziness because im sure each state would have a different belief and nobody would agree on anything. 

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, February 1, 7:57 PM

This article is about segments of California, Colorado, and Oregon wanting to separate and become their own states so their voices can be heard in Congress.

 

If, hypothetically, new states were formed out of existing ones this kind of gerrymandering would likely only lead to even more new states. It might even lead to a secession arms race to gain more Democrat and Republican seats in the Senate. With so many new states, it could lead to increased division, with no Democrat or Republican wanting to set foot in an opposition’s state. In the long run though, political affiliations do eventually change and we would have a precedent analogous to attempting to take the ball home when the other kids don't want to play the same game as you, which is not how a democratic republic works.

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CIAPS Set to Become Africa’s First Paperless Academic Institution

CIAPS Set to Become Africa’s First Paperless Academic Institution | Go Geo | Scoop.it
Mary Patrick Schoettinger's insight:

We've been hearing about becoming a paperless society for years now, but still find our offices and homes chaotic with the paper chase.  What would a truly paperless school look like?  What skills do we need to provide students to be truly prepared for this concept? What are the long term effects? What would future libraries look like?

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Picture quiz – do you know your world cities?

Picture quiz – do you know your world cities? | Go Geo | Scoop.it
Some city skylines are so iconic they are instantly recognisable.

Via Seth Dixon
Mary Patrick Schoettinger's insight:

I definately need to get out more! Good excuse for travel!

 

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harish magan's comment, September 10, 2013 7:09 AM
It is very interesting to explore new cities and their sky views
Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 12, 2013 12:41 PM

After taking this quiz I realized I could not really identify most of these cities. I could tell some of them were European from the look of the buildings. I also thought a few more were cities in the United States but there was only Dallas. In my opinion these cities are even more spectacular than some of our major cities. 

Lorettayoung's curator insight, May 8, 8:36 PM

is this ularu ?

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In China, one-child policy compounds loss of child for parents

In China, one-child policy compounds loss of child for parents | Go Geo | Scoop.it
One-child policy leaves some parents childless, hopeless and facing financial ruin in old age.

Via Seth Dixon
Mary Patrick Schoettinger's insight:

So many of the changes in China are economic. How quickly the government is able to respond to cultural and social changes remains to be seen. There is little doubt an economic crises is approaching demographically.

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Antonio Martinez's comment, September 12, 2013 3:36 PM
I can understand why this law is enforced. The obvious reason is that China has an unusually high population compared to other countries. Although, this law definitely has it's downsides. One being that if your child dies such as in the car accident in the beginning of the article, then you will be childless for the rest of your life.
jacob benner's comment, September 14, 2013 5:11 PM
China is overpopulated and it its becoming a problem, but by forcing parents to only have one child is leading to other problems. The childless parents describe there life to be empty and full of depression and without their child they are running into financial issues. Most of the time it is to late for the parents to have another child.
Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 15, 5:43 PM

I understand the issues China is having with their large population but the one-child policy hurts the average family. Problems occur when a family can only have one child. If anything were to happen to that child, whether he/she dies young, runs away or gets thrown in prison. That can leave the parents vulnerable later in life. When the parents become elderly they may not have a child to take care of them. China must find another way to control their population. 

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Geography in the News: Eurasia’s Boundaries

Geography in the News: Eurasia’s Boundaries | Go Geo | Scoop.it
By Neal Lineback and Mandy Lineback Gritzner, Geography in the NewsTM THE GEOGRAPHICAL DIVISIONS OF EUROPE AND ASIA Europe and Asia, while often considered two separate continents, both lie on the same landmass or tectonic plate, the Eurasian...

Via Neal G. Lineback
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shawn Giblin's curator insight, July 15, 2013 9:42 AM

very interesting to think that Turkey is a transcontinental country, as well to find out that asia and europe are actually connected.

Ryan Amado's curator insight, December 11, 2013 3:14 AM

Here we can see that the continental boundary between Russia and the rest of Europe has historically been solely based on national borders. However, a large majority of Russia's population and major cities are in the western part of the country, which is closer to Europe than most Asian countries.  Because of this, Europe and Asia gained an imaginary cultural border. It only makes sense that part of Russia began to be considered a European region even though it physically is a part of Asia.  It is better to talk about the entire land mass of Eurasia rather than two split continents when talking about Russia's borders.

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, March 3, 11:06 AM

I find this discussion very interesting.  How we define the boarders of the continents may not seem important but they do hold much in the way of historical and cultural meanings.  Is Europe separate from Asia or is it one super-continent?  The answer to that has many implications politically and culturally as well as historically.

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Stunning map charts every river in U.S.

Stunning map charts every river in U.S. | Go Geo | Scoop.it
The U.S. is often thought of as a nation connected by roads—since the 1960s the Interstate Highway has defined American culture and led to untold economic prosperity. But a new map of the nation’s rivers tells a very different story.

Via Seth Dixon
Mary Patrick Schoettinger's insight:

In addition, using the theory of gravity , this map would make an interesting study in identifying the sources and tributaries of the major rivers. Just where are the highlands of America?

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Kristen McDaniel's curator insight, July 12, 2013 10:21 AM

Seriously, I could stare at this map all day.  It is REALLY cool.  I'm thinking of all kinds of discussion it could bring to the classroom!

John Blunnie's curator insight, July 12, 2013 11:11 AM

Seeing this map really shows why almost all places in the U.S. have been inhabited before the industrial era.

Louis Culotta's comment, July 15, 2013 9:52 AM
this is a very cool way to get a good look at our nations river systems and how to best use them for productive and environmental safety of them.
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Maps of Panem - The Hunger Games

Maps of Panem - The Hunger Games | Go Geo | Scoop.it
From The Hunger Games trilogy: different perspectives on the country of Panem.

Via Seth Dixon
Mary Patrick Schoettinger's insight:

Middle schoolers loved the trilogy. What an awesome way to build regional identity (sense of place) by using these maps as a jumping off point to research how these regions got their identity!

 

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Chris Scott's curator insight, July 2, 2013 11:02 AM

As I looked at this map, it amazes me at how the post-apocalyptic North America could look like. I read the books and I actually did not think of some of North America being partially submerged.

 

Cam E's curator insight, January 28, 12:50 PM

An interesting imagination of the Districts in the Hunger Games and where they might be in North America (excluding Cental American and the Carribean). All of these seem to come from some sort of common sense perspective based on the actual products from each region. We can see that the region which produces Electronics would be the geographical equivilent to California, which is well known for their technology within the Silicon Valley region. Some of these regions elude my minimal knowledge in Geography, and I can only guess at their purpose. Could the Luxury Item District be a tongue-in cheek joke about Las Vegas? Or even Hollywood? The "Peacekeepers" district being centered somewhat near Texas and the border with Mexico makes me wonder if it's placed there because of our border fence with Mexico.

Gabbie J's curator insight, May 9, 8:16 PM

If you have ever read the Hunger Games series , then you were probably curious on where the districts are located. These are some interpretations that other people have made to try and fulfill the Hunger Games fans needs for a conclusion . You could even see what district you would live in if you lived in Panem. 

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Meandering Stream

Meandering Stream | Go Geo | Scoop.it

"I'm used to rivers that know what they're doing."


Via Seth Dixon
Mary Patrick Schoettinger's insight:

Where nature and art collide. This is a beautiful image of nature doing her best to upset the skills PDF cartography!

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Hoffman's comment, September 14, 2013 1:32 PM
hmm, looks like some river had a little to much
Peter Phillips's comment, October 5, 2013 7:31 PM
All rivers move. Those that have a wide, flat basin meander most. Those meanders can be even more dramatic than in this image, snaking 10's of kilometres sideways over time. Combine this action with geological upheaval and it gets even more interesting. Check out images of the Murray River in Australia from space.
Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, December 6, 2013 11:34 AM

Lol... the first words that went through my head were h--- (heck) yeah.  David Bowie... sung by an astronaut... okay, back to Geography. I thought that the rivers reminded me of something I thought of during the talk in class about lava rock being changed into other kinds of rocks over time, and cycling around.  I thought on a larger scale, about this universe, and I have read before that people are studying different areas of space-time fabrics, trying to find origins of the Universe, and answers to other existential questions.  I suppose that if one could trace patterns of rivers, and if one could trace patterns of rocks, to find where they came from, and why/how they came where they came, then by examining the (assumedly tattered and marked) fabrics of space and time, people would be able to determine origins of everything from the beginning of what existed before all universes, and also the origins of life forms.  I enjoyed the movie Prometheus, which was directed by Sir Ridley Scott, and I had to say that I thought that the messages found on rocks in caves, as a catalyst that lead the cast to go visit an alien world that had something to do with human origins, could be very literally taken.  If there are clues in rocks, why wouldn't there be other clues, possibly in celluar components of life forms, or space and time?  Applying the idea of studying rocks and rivers and other physical geographical pursuits to the idea of applying it on a gigantic scale greatly appeals to me.  I believe that humans will find some answers that way, but I hadn't directly realized just that until we mentioned some stuff about physical geography, and glacial forces carrying and spreading out rocks, and deposits and erosion.  After all, the Milky Way has origins, so why believe that we came from the Milky Way, rather than beyond?

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Border Walls

Border Walls | Go Geo | Scoop.it

"Geographer Reece Jones discusses his recent book Border Walls, examining the history of how and why societies have chosen to literally wall themselves apart.  He gives a brief history of political maps, how international lines reshape landscapes, and how the trend towards increased border wall construction contrasts with the view of a “borderless” world under globalization."


Via Seth Dixon
Mary Patrick Schoettinger's insight:

Looking forward to reading this. Seth Dixon's insight mentions the current practice of building walls that separates the haves from the have nots is telling. Is it possible to include natural resources in the whole wealth question? Is damming water a form of building a border wall?

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Donald Dane's comment, December 10, 2013 9:00 AM
listening to some of the podcast you can get an in-depth synopsis of this. the walls that divide our countries and even towns over time have all the criteria and/or reasoning. Great Wall of China to keep invaders from starting war, Berlin Wall to divide german supporters of war, America/Mexican boarder is to keep illegal immigrants from coming, fence in your moms backyard is to keep neighbors/animals out of yard. Walls all have the same concept of avoiding war, trespassers and privacy. this is seen in not only everyday living but in military use as well.
Amanda Morgan's comment, September 13, 4:49 PM
I found this podcast to be interesting because it seems as though the more popular globalization is becoming, and the more it grows, there are more borders and walls being built. By secluding the poor communities, wealthier communities could essentially cut them off to the rest of the globe.
Amanda Morgan's curator insight, September 18, 10:52 AM

I found this podcast to be interesting because it seems as though the more popular globalization is becoming, and the more it grows, there are more borders and walls being built. By secluding the poor communities, wealthier communities could essentially cut them off to the rest of the globe.

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Night Sky Comes Alive With Aurora Borealis

Night Sky Comes Alive With Aurora Borealis | Go Geo | Scoop.it

"Peak season to spot rare, dazzling night skies over Canada and Alaska."


Via Seth Dixon
Mary Patrick Schoettinger's insight:

I was disappointed here in DE just because of the rarity of even the possibility of seeing the event. It was fun looking anyway and the night sky was, as always, a little mindblowiing!

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Lorraine Chaffer's comment, June 1, 2013 7:49 AM
Aurora Borealis has cultural significance for many people in the arctic
Morgan Stewart's comment, July 25, 2013 9:15 PM
This is so beautiful! Seeing an aurora borealis is one of the things on my bucket list and I really hope I get to experience it.
Chloe Williamson's comment, August 13, 2013 10:12 AM
This is would be an incredible sight to witness! I hope I can see is beautiful aurora one day.
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Freshwater Stores Shrank in Tigris-Euphrates Basin

Freshwater Stores Shrank in Tigris-Euphrates Basin | Go Geo | Scoop.it
An arid region grew even drier between 2003 and 2009 due to human consumption of water for drinking and agriculture.

Via Seth Dixon
Mary Patrick Schoettinger's insight:

What we don't learn from the past is bound to repeat itself-over and over again.

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Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, March 19, 9:14 AM

The use of water is an increasing problem in the arid regions of the world.  The use of more sophisticated irrigation systems allow for more planting which requires more water.  Coupled with increasing towns and cities needing fresh water for the inhabitants this decrease in fresh water will only continue to trend.

Amy Marques's curator insight, April 24, 12:52 PM

What's happening in the Tigris-Euphrates Basin is similar to what is happening to the Aral Sea. Freshwater Stores Shrank in just 4 years. Humans are drastically altering the landscape and if we don't start to find others ways of doing things and change the way in which we do agriculture and use our water, there could be a serious water shortage for millions of people.

James Hobson's curator insight, October 22, 6:24 PM

(Southwest Asia topic 2)

The area known as the Cradle of Humanity is becoming less hospitable. Though natural climate change can be attributed to the dryer conditions, humans have made just as much of an impact. Increased water usage leads to less reserve. Impacts stretch further, however. Less water flow below the dam can lead to changes in sedimentation patterns and disrupt wildlife habitats, potentially causing harm to wildlife.

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Africa Map Collection

Africa Map Collection | Go Geo | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
Mary Patrick Schoettinger's insight:

Love seeing the  change over time.  Especially on a continent we often know so little about.

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Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, March 19, 10:30 AM

It is always informative to look at old maps.  They show how the cartographers saw the world and how the passage of the map makers revealed the passage of settlements in this case of colonel Europeans.

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, March 25, 1:38 PM

This collection of maps are interesting as they show how mysterious the African continent was to Europeans. With deep expeditions into the continent expensive, difficult, and dangerous, central Africa remained very much a mystery into the 20th century. The Mountains of the Moon and the Mountains of Kong, the supposed sources of the Niger and Nile river, were completely fabricated guesswork which remained on maps until the 20th century. For central Africa, rather than make guesses as to the terrain, cartographers frequently left the area blank or with scant details.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 4:06 PM

Maps come in all shapes and sizes. This one shows the divisions in Africa and how its been shaped and defined since colonization.

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Spatial Navigation Before GPS

Spatial Navigation Before GPS | Go Geo | Scoop.it

"Giant 70-foot concrete arrows that point your way across the country, left behind by a forgotten age of US mail delivery.  Long before the days of radio (and those convenient little smartphone applications), the US Postal service began a cross-country air mail service using army war surplus planes from World War I.  The federal government funded enormous concrete arrows to be built every 10 miles or so along established airmail routes they were each built alongside a 50 foot tall tower with a rotating gas-powered light. These airway beacons are said to have been visible from a distance of 10 miles high."


Via Seth Dixon
Mary Patrick Schoettinger's insight:

How quickly we adapt to technologies to make work simpler. In it's day, this was the height of forward thinking. How will future generations see our GPS technology?

 

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Giovanni Sonego's curator insight, December 15, 2013 1:49 PM

Adesso sembra incredibile che si usasse un sistema simile per guidare la posta aerea. Forse a quei tempi sembrava normale. 

Steven Flis's curator insight, December 16, 2013 3:14 AM

I love articles like this one where they talk about the collide of different times. This article speaks of huge concrete arrows which were left from 1930's air mail routes. sadly most of the towers that were paired with the arrows have been dismantled but still really cool that these directional arrows from the past can still be found almost 90 years later.

Elle Reagan's curator insight, September 28, 11:44 PM

Wow technology has come a long way in just a short amount of time! We would still be using  those stone arrows if it wasn't for the invention of the GPS. 

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Puzzle: Put the Congressional Districts Back Together

Puzzle: Put the Congressional Districts Back Together | Go Geo | Scoop.it

Gerrymandering is the practice of redrawing congressional districts after a decadal census to favor one political party over the other.


Via Seth Dixon
Mary Patrick Schoettinger's insight:

Terrific tool for a complex situation!

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Dennis V Thomas's curator insight, October 5, 2013 10:42 AM

Do these look like they are contiguous and compact? Many of the issues in the House of Reps is that districts have been created that are super majority for one party and the only competition is in the primary. This creates extremism and diminishes the opportunity for dialog. Only radicles can be elected in the primary election and those that represent the majority are defeated. One great example was Dick Lugar in Indiana.

Dennis V Thomas's curator insight, October 5, 2013 10:43 AM

Do these look like they are contiguous and compact? Many of the issues in the House of Reps is that districts have been created that are super majority for one party and the only competition is in the primary. This creates extremism and diminishes the opportunity for dialog. Only radicles can be elected in the primary election and those that represent the majority are defeated. One great example was Dick Lugar in Indiana.

Courtney Burns's curator insight, November 20, 2013 3:15 PM

Personally I think Gerrymandering is unfair and should not be allowed, because it gives a political party to much of an advantage over the other. It really is of no surprise that our government finally shut down. By packing certain states and restructuring districts to create more of an advantage for your political party is corrupt. How are we supposed to run a successful government when we are altering districts and packing districts to favor a certain party? That is unfair and shouldn't be allowed. After all these years we should have some system in place to make government election as fair as possible. But by allowing parties to set different districts we will never reach that point. Gerrymandering is destorying our government, and we can see that from the most recent government shut down. There needs to be some changes made. 

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View From Your Window

View From Your Window | Go Geo | Scoop.it

A fun game where players guess where in the world a photo is taken by clicking on a map.
http://ictmagic.wikispaces.com/PSHE%2C+RE%2C+Citizenship%2C+Geography+%26+Environmental


Via ICTmagic
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animedubbedonline's comment, September 9, 2013 3:11 PM
it's helpful
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Stunning Aerials of Iceland's Volcanic Rivers (PHOTOS) - weather.com

Stunning Aerials of Iceland's Volcanic Rivers (PHOTOS) - weather.com | Go Geo | Scoop.it
Moscow-based photographer Andre Ermolaev captured the natural beauty of Iceland with his series of aerial images of rivers flowing through beds of volcanic ash.
Mary Patrick Schoettinger's insight:

We marvel at the image of rivers and their pathways.  It is interesting to see how similar and yet so different the course of Volcanic River flows.

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OCEARCH Global Tracking Central

OCEARCH Global Tracking Central | Go Geo | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
Mary Patrick Schoettinger's insight:

My son looks forward to Shark Week every year. This information is for him!

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 16, 2013 10:03 PM

This is a project sponsored by OCEARCH (Ocean Reseach) that helps to track the journeys of individual sharks to better understand their migratory patterns.  This data also helps to establish maps of the spatial extend of Shark habitat.  This is in essence another fantastic practical application of GPS technology.


Tags: biogeographymapping, GPS.

gina lockton's curator insight, July 17, 2013 12:38 AM

Just when you thought it was safe to get in the ocean......... This is an example of using technology in a bio/geographical way

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Do You Live In IHOP America Or Waffle House America?

Do You Live In IHOP America Or Waffle House America? | Go Geo | Scoop.it

There is a pretty ridiculous North-South split, although Maryland, northern Virginia, and southern Florida (which is pretty much the North anyways) fall into pancake territory, while Waffle House has made inroads into Ohio and Indiana.


Via Seth Dixon
Mary Patrick Schoettinger's insight:

Maybe the big question is which franchise is spreading faster and further? Inquiring minds want to know!

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Hye-Hyun Kang's curator insight, January 9, 11:35 PM

This article basically shows that South prefer waffles than pancakes. Although, there's very small part of Texas that prefers waffles over pancakes. 

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, October 13, 1:13 PM

This map shows how divided north and south are in terms of Pancakes and waffles, with Pancakes having a larger reach than waffles, and showing how regional differences are effected by something as odd as fast food.

Jennifer Brown's curator insight, October 20, 9:13 AM

I love this! I've been to both and I have to say that I'm glad we have Ihops around here rather than Waffle Houses. How can something be called a "Waffle House" and yet only make two kinds of waffles?

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National Geographic show "Brain Games" challenging what you think you know ... - CBS News

National Geographic show "Brain Games" challenging what you think you know ... - CBS News | Go Geo | Scoop.it
National Geographic show "Brain Games" challenging what you think you know ...
CBS News
That's a theme of the program "Brain Games" on the National Geographic Channel, which uses experiments to challenge what we think we know about the brain.

Via Mike Busarello's Digital Textbooks
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Here's what Pangea looks like mapped with modern political borders

Here's what Pangea looks like mapped with modern political borders | Go Geo | Scoop.it
Pretty wild, right? It's a map of Pangea — a supercontinent that formed roughly 300 million years ago — mapped with contemporary geopolitical borders.

Via Seth Dixon
Mary Patrick Schoettinger's insight:

This may answer so many of the logistical questions we wondered about staring at a globe in 4th grade. Really clears up the puzzle pieces.

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Padmanabhan Jaikumar's comment, June 5, 2013 12:57 AM
may be answers to many questions
Magnus Gustafsson's comment, June 12, 2013 2:37 AM
Tnanks! This map makes it easier to understand our world right now.
Steven Flis's curator insight, December 17, 2013 3:27 PM

My favorite part about this map has to be its unintentionaly demographich connecter (If that even makes sense) for example along the south east part of the united states their are alot of latin americans and on this map the two continents are brought closer to each other to match the cultural demogaphic. To continue this the east coast and dixie are have a massive african american population. and again the african continent is brought close to people who have ancestreal roots to it. I know that pangea is not the reason why each culture settled in its respetive area just funny how well that worked out.

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Opinion: Geography lessons make a world of difference in education

Opinion: Geography lessons make a world of difference in education | Go Geo | Scoop.it
To meet workforce needs, scholarships must be available to support the best and brightest students who choose to pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in geography

Via Seth Dixon
Mary Patrick Schoettinger's insight:

Many suggest that's those who want more geography education should be satisfied that it is one of the tiers of social studies. But we have seen even social studies be cut to half a year in our elementary schools. How can we build the necessary geographic, civic, economic, and history foundations in such short amount of time? Even now, as we access our news, it daily becomes more apparent how important these studies are.

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Bonnie Bracey Sutton's comment, May 8, 2013 1:27 PM
I agree. I learned geography with the National Geographic Society as a mentor in workshops and guided initiatives.
Lulu Farah's comment, May 8, 2013 1:31 PM
A good question for the educators of Geography is where is Somaliland? If they know the answer then that is good enough for Somalilanders.
Francisco Javier 's curator insight, May 12, 2013 8:50 PM

Opinion: Geography lessons make a world of difference in education | @scoopit via @APHumanGeog http://sco.lt/...

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How Geography Explains the United States - By Aaron David Miller

How Geography Explains the United States - By Aaron David Miller | Go Geo | Scoop.it

Via Emma Lafleur
Mary Patrick Schoettinger's insight:

There are so many facets to geography and the United States has certainly benefitted from all of them; from location to abundant natural resources to cultural histories. I think this is a good introduction to the topic.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 17, 2013 6:32 PM

Questions to ponder: How much do you agree with the author's assertion that geography explains the foreign affairs of the U.S.?  Is there any environmental determinism in this argument?  

Louis Culotta's comment, April 18, 2013 12:41 PM
I would think that the united states treats Canada a lot better at than in Mexico because of the border issues that exist because of people trying to smuggle drugs or people into America from Mexico continues to be abig problem with the US goverment.
Maegan Connor's curator insight, December 17, 2013 1:48 PM

I think the very last paragraph of this article is one of the truest statements about America that I have ever read.  "There's so much good America can do in the world." This is absolutely true because as the author covered, the U.S. is very good at getting involved in foreign affairs and we are extremely lucky to have the borders that we do.  We're safe on this side of the globe, a world away from the places that have suffered religious and political turmoil for centuries.  

However, the citizens of the U.S. often remain marginally uneducated about out foreign affairs because of the portrayals by the media and the many covered up mistakes that the U.S. has made.  The author of this piece noted America's three major faults as pragmatism, idealism, arrogance and ambivalence.  The United States is ultimately the most conceited country in the world but it's not entirely the fault of its citizens.  U.S. media's job is not necessarily to report the truth but report the fractions of truth that will continue to inspire nationalism, even if that means leaving out the fact that many problems around the world have been increased due to America's participation.

The author of this piece pointed out America's habit of only joining in when it is beneficial for our country, even if it is not in the best interest of the people we are helping.  We offered assistance to the reformers in Egypt but ignored problems raging in Bahrain.  The U.S. has only limited understanding of many of the old, traditional cultures that reign in parts of the Middle East but that does not stop the country from trying to help and often, looking foolish or inciting more unrest.

We have grown to feel very safe in on our side of the planet and regardless of the few attacks that have penetrated America's defense, we still have a very limited world view because there are no threats from our neighbors and it is okay to be whomever you'd like to be (technically speaking because racism, sexism, and homophobia are still rampant in this country) without threats from people around you.  It would be in our country's best interest to educate ourselves on world events and other cultures to be well rounded and less offensive to those who suffer in other regions. The author called America's belief that the problems between Israeli's and Palestinians would resolve with a classic Hollywood happy ending a part of America's problem with idealism and not understanding what it is like to have neighbors who want to dive in during the midst of horrible wars and take whatever they can get their hands on.   Having the borders that it does, it was never a real threat that the U.S. faced. 

I think this article is spot on with the problems in U.S. foreign policy and how geography affects our culture and our ideas of how the world works.

Rescooped by Mary Patrick Schoettinger from Rhode Island Geography Education Alliance
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Maple Syrup Time

Maple Syrup Time | Go Geo | Scoop.it

March and April are key months for harvesting sap from trees, making this sugar time in New England.  New England's climate and biogeography make this the right time because the because the combination of freezing nights and warm spring days gets the sap in the native species of maple trees to flow.  The sap get boiled down to syrup, but did you know that it takes roughly 40 gallons of sap that to get 1 gallon of pure maple syrup?   


Via Seth Dixon
Mary Patrick Schoettinger's insight:

Sap seems to rise in students, too!  It happens every spring! Actually, there were some surprises in the production map!

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Rescooped by Mary Patrick Schoettinger from Geography Education
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19 Maps That Will Help You Put The United States In Perspective

19 Maps That Will Help You Put The United States In Perspective | Go Geo | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
Mary Patrick Schoettinger's insight:

Great map tools for kids and adults to get a better understanding of relative size of US vs the world.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 17, 2013 5:25 PM

This classic image is paired with some other great maps and videos that help put the true size of the United States into perspective. 


Tags: perspective, map.  

Heather Ramsey's curator insight, March 18, 2013 2:05 PM

This site has lots of great examples of size comparisons between the United States and other coutnries/continents around the world. Which one is the most surprising to you? Why do you think you had a different idea of the size of the place that surprised you?

Ursula Sola de Hinestrosa's curator insight, March 18, 2013 9:13 PM

A punta de TIC el mundo se achicó !