Globicate - Globa...
Follow
Find tag "physical"
1.9K views | +0 today
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Heidi Befort from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Perpetual Ocean by NASA

NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center Scientific Visualization Studio — the same team that recently brought us an animation of the moon as it will appear from Earth for each hour of 2012 — has also released a stunning video called “Perpetual Ocean,” a time lapse of the world’s ocean currents as calculated by the ECCO2 computational model.

 

This is an stunning visualization of ocean currents.  Thanks for the suggestion! 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Michelle Carvajal's curator insight, December 11, 2012 9:10 PM

This video is pretty awesome! I love how it shows the different ways that the currents move around the continents and in mid ocean. How are we not to expect for natural phenomenoms to be unpredictable when our oceansa re the same. i would have never expected to see so many idfferent flows and currents but they do exist. It gives you a look into how are planet works and also gives you a chilling thought of how easily a ship would get lost in deep ocean waters. - M. Carvajal

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 15, 2014 4:39 PM

This is an amazing video. The technology we have at our disposable is truly remarkable and we have reached a point where mapping all the currents of the ocean can be done and put up on youtube. This information is available to people who otherwise would have no idea how to interpret ocean currents.

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, December 16, 2014 10:18 AM

This video shows just how technology is advancing, being able to show how the world's water currents move and, especially, showing how different our bodies of water are. I always thought the currents were somehow connected, but now I see that many move in their own way.

Rescooped by Heidi Befort from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Unrest at Turrialba Volcano, Costa Rica

Unrest at Turrialba Volcano, Costa Rica | Globicate - Global Education for a New Generation | Scoop.it
Emissions of gas and ash indicate an increase in activity at Costa Rica’s Turrialba volcano in January 2010.

 

A new vent opened this month on Turriabla, the easternmost of Costa Rica's active volacanoes.  This false-color, near-infrared satellite image would be an effective teaching tool to discuss the importantce of geospatial technologies to monitor the Earth's surface. 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, February 6, 2014 11:51 AM

This article reminds us of how fragile the earth’s crust can be.  The rock can be ‘rotten’ when it is cooled prematurely due to rain, causing it to fracture more easily.

Jess Deady's curator insight, April 28, 2014 1:56 PM

Using different teaching methods and technologies is a part of every day life. Figuring out new ways to teach students about observing and identifying whats happening in a photo is highly important. This geospatial photograph can be used in many ways. It can be used to note color differences, and realize that this volcano has emissions that can be seen in the picture erupting from it.

James Hobson's curator insight, September 28, 2014 9:50 PM

(Central America topic 9)

Having a volcano that looms behind your city suddenly come back to life is about as much of a wakeup call as anybody would want. Though in this case it was determined that a major eruption was not immanent, it raises the question as to weighing the risks of living in such areas.  However, to me it seems that living at the base of Turriabla is not much more risky than living in other regions. Costa Ricans may have to deal with volcanoes, but so do those living around Mt. St. Helens, islands in the Pacific Ring of Fire, and even around Yellowstone. Aside from volcanoes, other environmental risks (floods, droughts, extreme temperatures, hurricanes, blizzards, landslides, tornadoes, wildfires, etc.) are other things just as worthy of being revered. So if you're safe from volcanoes, it's still likely you're more at risk from another form of nature's wrath.

Rescooped by Heidi Befort from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

What are Continents?

This is not as straightforward a question as you might think. 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.