Globicate - Global Education for a New Generation
1.9K views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Heidi Befort from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Documentary: Last Train Home

Documentary: Last Train Home | Globicate - Global Education for a New Generation | Scoop.it

Every spring, China's cities are plunged into chaos as 130 million migrant workers journey to their home villages for the New Year in the world's largest human migration.

 

I've posted in the past about this documentary which portrays the The cultural importance of New Year's in China and the massive corresponding migratory shifts that take place.  What is new is that the 85 minute documentary is now available online.  "Last Train Home takes viewers on a heart-stopping journey with the Zhangs, a couple who left infant children behind for factory jobs 16 years ago, hoping their wages would lift their children to a better life. They return to a family growing distant and a daughter longing to leave school for unskilled work. As the Zhangs navigate their new world, Last Train Home paints a rich, human portrait of China's rush to economic development."

 

Tags: China, EastAsia, migration, development, labor, development, transportation, unit 2 population.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Betty Denise's comment, October 10, 2012 1:29 PM
The request video is not available ...
Rescooped by Heidi Befort from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Niger 'worst place to be mother'

Niger 'worst place to be mother' | Globicate - Global Education for a New Generation | Scoop.it
The West African state of Niger is now the worst place in the world to be a mother, a Save the Children annual report says.

 

Gender, demographics and development are the main geographic themes that run through this report.  As many countries prepare to celebrate Mother's Day, the Non-Governmental Organization Save the Children considers the geography of motherhood and the difficulties in raising a healthy, educated, well-fed child with economic opportunities for the future.  The variables used in the index included factors such as health, education, economic status and nutrition as key indicators that would be pertinent to motherhood. 

 

The most difficult place to raise a child according to the report are: 1) Niger, 2) Afghanistan, 3) Yemen, 4) Guinea-Bissau and 5)Mali.  The best places to raise healthy, education children are: 1) Norway, 2) Iceland, 3) Sweden, 4) New Zealand and 5)Denmark.  For more information about Save the Children, see: http://www.savethechildren.net/


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Heidi Befort from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Gender: The Shocking Truth

Gender: The Shocking Truth | Globicate - Global Education for a New Generation | Scoop.it

"In the poorest regions of the world, girls are among the most disadvantaged people on the planet.

 

---One billion people live in extreme poverty—70% are women and girls.67 million children worldwide don’t go to school, over half are girls.

---One extra year of primary school can mean 10-20% higher wages for a girl.

---When a girl in the developing world stays in school for seven or more years, she’ll marry later and have fewer, healthier children."

 

This site links to the "Because I Am a Girl" initiative which is designed to break the cycle of poverty and strengthen communities.  http://www.planusa.org/becauseiamagirl/ ;


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Heidi Befort from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

MDG drinking water target being met is cause for celebration

MDG drinking water target being met is cause for celebration | Globicate - Global Education for a New Generation | Scoop.it
Sanjay Wijesekera: This achievement shows that where there is a will, it is possible to truly transform the lives of hundreds of millions of people for the better.

 

The MDG (Millennial Development Goal) to cut the global population that does not have access to clean drinking water was cut in half, and five years ahead of schedule. The World Health Organization and the United Nations are very pleased with this achievement, but it is a timely reminder of the developmental problems of poverty and access that still exist. For example, 783 million people still do not have access to clean drinking water.  3,000 children die each day from diarrheal diseases (usually from bad drinking water and poor sanitation). Although some success should be celebrated, the world, in the currently constituted social, economic and political framework, still does not provide the most basic of requirements for a sizable portion of humanity.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Heidi Befort from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Water.org

Water.org | Globicate - Global Education for a New Generation | Scoop.it

Over 1 billion people can stream music and videos in this increasingly technologically advanced world.  It is estimated that 1.2 billion people have access to the internet.  Simultaneously, we live in a world where 884 million people still do not have access to clean water.  The digital divide is troubling, but the fact that millions don't have access to clean water, toilets or sanitation is horrifying.  This site is one way to be a part of the solution.   


Via Seth Dixon
more...
ASeagrave's comment, January 30, 2012 2:18 PM
I cannot believe three times our entire population is somewhere in the world without clean water when all we have to do is walk to the nearest sink to get it. It's sad.
Rescooped by Heidi Befort from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Water and Development

Water and Development | Globicate - Global Education for a New Generation | Scoop.it

When access to clean drinking water is an issue, it creates a web of developmental problems for a community.  For a video with more information about water/development statistics, but the organization http://charitywater.org see: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BCHhwxvQqxg&feature=player_embedded


Via Seth Dixon
more...
David 's comment, May 21, 2012 11:58 PM
thank you for your awesome information
Rescooped by Heidi Befort from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Africa’s Population Surge

Africa’s Population Surge | Globicate - Global Education for a New Generation | Scoop.it
At current growth rates, sub-Saharan Africa, which now makes up 12 percent of the world’s population, will account for more than a third by 2100.

 

Africa is the world's fastest growing region and consequently it is an incredibly young (demographically speaking) region.  This video show key reasons (primarily cultural and economic) for the population growth within Africa.  How does the  demographic transition model apply to Africa?


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Melissa Marie Falco-Dargitz's curator insight, November 3, 2014 12:46 PM

With declining rates of infant mortality, stable and growing maternity rates, the population of Africa is being projected to account for 33% of the world’s population. This may hold true unless we see what is happening in Europe, where increased maternal education and help with child rearing for society is leading to smaller families. So much so, that they have whole towns dying from lack of population replacement. China is seeing this as well with their “one child” program.  Unless sub-Saharan Africa starts a program heavy on education, the area will far exceed it’s ability to house and feed it’s populace.

Alex Vielman's curator insight, December 14, 2015 12:31 AM

Within the other regions discussed in class, I can start to see how much of a global issue overpopulation is to the world. Alone, sub-Saharan Africa accounts for 12% of the global population and could possible go up to 1/3 by 2100. This is in incredibly huge number despite the time giving for it to occur. African suffers some similar problems as India. The areas are so overpopulated it becomes unsafe due to sanitation, water, food, and amongst all poverty. The big problem as well is that the generations are rather young. Nigeria is Africans most populous area. The poverty in this area where the power goes off in the middle of a birth and flashlights are being used in order to help the mother give birth. This is very important to analyze that not the proper equipment is giving for these people living in this region. The positive is that more people are being aware of pre contraceptives and seeking more family planning. 

Martin Kemp's curator insight, December 17, 2015 2:56 PM

as we have seen in several articles before this is a large problem all over the world. mass population growth that the government can not keep up with will become a huge problem and lead to much more poverty. this needs to be handled carefully by individual governments and hopfully they can find a way to control this problem.

Rescooped by Heidi Befort from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

U.S. Intelligence Says Water Shortages Threaten Stability

U.S. Intelligence Says Water Shortages Threaten Stability | Globicate - Global Education for a New Generation | Scoop.it

"Competition for increasingly scarce water in the next decade will fuel instability in regions such as South Asia and the Middle East that are important to U.S. national security, according to a U.S. intelligence report."

 

Geographic thinking is about uncovering the spatial connections between issues that on the surface might not seem related.  Multinational river basins are a perfect example of environmental resources that demand international cooperation for successful management, and it regions of scarcity and population growth, it is easy to envision clashing viewpoints on how to fairly share such resources.

 

Discussion questions: What geographic themes are evident in this article? What geographic problems could exacerbate the problem? What could alleviate these issues in the future?


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 23, 2014 2:22 PM

Water is a huge resources and obviously something that we use everyday and in the US take for granted because there are many countries suffereing from sortages such as this nation. Which of the following it is threatening not just the stability of the nation but the stability of the people and the society that make up that nation.

Rescooped by Heidi Befort from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

South Asia doing worst on UN development goals

South Asia doing worst on UN development goals | Globicate - Global Education for a New Generation | Scoop.it
South Asian nations are making the least progress in the Asia-Pacific region on meeting MDGs, an Asian Development Bank official says...

 

The UN's developmental goals are include reducing child and maternal mortality, halving poverty and hunger, providing universal primary education, gender equality and halting the spread of HIV/AIDS. In the Asia/Pacific region there are 17 countries that are not meeting the goals and all South Asian countries (except Sri Lanka) are labeled as 'off track.'


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Justin Ng Jie Ern's curator insight, January 20, 2014 10:22 AM

There are about 17 countries who are off-track the Millennium Development Goals. Out of the 17, all South Asian countries are included with the exception of Sri Lanka.

These countries are experiencing poverty and the lack of proper education.

I am worry for these 17 countries, as most of them are undevelop countries. I am afraid that as the world continues to move forward for the better,  these undeveloped countries would get left behind in the process.

I am dissapointed by the fact that some countries' government are not taking the initiative to help the country to stop poverty, and end the misery of these countries.

But i am enlighted and encouraged by the fact that, some of the governments are taking up the initiative to stop poverty. I am also enlighted that these governements are trying their best to improve their education system for young minds too.

In my opinion, all government should take the initiative to clear this obsacle called 'poverty' and help improve their education system, to help educate this country's children.

BrandonTeoZX's curator insight, January 21, 2014 7:41 AM

Reading this article, i feel a bit spoilt. Why? Here i sit, in a comfortable armchair and with a roof over my head, food on the table, clothes to wear, i feel like a king compared to them. People in southeast asia are not doing very well, children having no basic education, people contracting HIV or AIDS easily, some do not even have clean water to drink from. Singapore is a country in Southeast asia, and yet we are one of the world's richest nations, in stark contrast to the other parts of Asia. What can people do about this? What can we do to help? 

jerriel wai's curator insight, January 26, 2014 8:55 AM

connect: The UN has been helping countries facing poverty issues for quite some time now. They are a great corparation that helps

 

extend: I thought they only helped the countries not solve the countries problems. This should be done by the government.  I believe that this can be done by making the government corruption free.

'

challenge: Lets try to stop poverty in south asia, shall we?