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Globalisation and interdependence
Looking at the global interaction and interdependence
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Shake the Dust

This trailer for the documentary 'Shake the Dust' shows the globalization of youth culture and the diffusion of the creative art known as break dancing. This film challenges its developed-world viewers to reconceptualize how they perceive the lives of people living in the developing world as more than just poverty and misery, but to see the humanity and joy. In this 12 minute clip, you'll see portrayals of teenagers in Uganda and Yemen who are a part of cultural institutions and can be agents for change within their society and even political forces.  For more information about the documentary, visit: http://www.shakethedust.org


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West Africa: Slavery in the Chocolate Industry

Although slavery is no longer legal there are still millions of people living in slavery today. One place and industry where slaves still exist is the cocoa ...

 

The world's leading producer of cocoa is Côte d'Ivoire and dirty secret is that slavery is commonplace on cocoa plantations in West Africa.    Children are smuggled from countries such as Mali, Niger and Burkina Faso and then are placed on remote, isolated plantations.  While statistics are all guesstimates, this video is purporting that 35% of the world's chocolate is produced by slave labor (I've seen higher estimates).  What factors lead to this horrific condition?  How is this a geographic issue?    


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Beth Jung's curator insight, February 9, 8:26 AM

This article is about children trafficking and child labor in West Africa. The director of this documentary is trying to tell people around the world that almost all famous chocolate factories such as Snickers, Nestle, etc, use cocoa from the cocoa plantations in Ivory Coast that use child labor to make as much chocolate they can with the least amount of money used. There are serious issues going on in West Africa, because most cocoa plantation workers are children who were smuggled around many countries such as Mali, Niger, and Burkina Faso and were separated to isolated plantations. People who are working in the Cocoa Industry have all denied the fact that the children are working in the plantation; Even the Vice President of Ivory Coast denied the fact of children trafficking. Also, all the famous chocolate factories had declined the interview for this documentary. A lot of people around the village have helped the captured children escape back to their home, saving more than a hundred children. This article helped me understand more about Africa's bad economy. By using child trafficking, people get free workers as well as sell children; 230 Euros each. It costs less to buy children than to pay the workers. This article made me realize that the only way I could help the African children is to spread the awareness to the whole wide world. This article also made me want to go to Ivory Coast when I get older. Children Trafficking hurts my loving heart and I would go to Ivory Coast and help children go back to their home.

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 17, 12:38 AM

Its both sad and horrific to think that chocolate, such a pleasure and luxury item in the west comes as such a high cost. It's so sad that so many people are oppressed and used in situations such as this just so those living in places of plenty can enjoy resources like chocolate. Unfortunately it seems for the few to benefit many more have to suffer and endure hardships.  

John Nieuwendyk's curator insight, December 17, 5:03 PM

I was not aware that slavery is still not unusual in cocoa plantation in West Africa. It sickens me because nations all around the world consume chocolate produced under slave labor.