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Globalisation and interdependence
Looking at the global interaction and interdependence
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Biggest transnational companies

Biggest transnational companies | Globalisation and interdependence | Scoop.it
THE giant American conglomerate General Electric (GE) holds more assets abroad than any other non-financial firm in the world—over $500 billion worth. Its foreign assets make up over 70% of its total.

 

While we may think of Volkswagen as a "German" company, 78% of their assets are in other countries. What advantages is there for companies to have operations in multiple countries? How do transnational corporations change the geographies of production, consumption and economics?


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Role of U.S. Airports in Epidemics

Public health crises of the past decade — such as the 2003 SARS outbreak, which spread to 37 countries and caused about 1,000 deaths, and the 2009 H1N1 flu p...

 

The spread of infectious diseases is inherently connected to the mobility of infected.  Airports are important nodes in this complex transportation network.  Which airports would have the greatest potential to spread diseases?  At MIT, they've gathered data that incorporates variations in travel patterns among individuals, the geographic locations of airports, the disparity in interactions among airports, and waiting times at individual airports to create a tool that could be used to predict where and how fast a disease might spread.  To read more, see the associated article. 


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Amazon’s New Push for Same-Day Delivery Will Destroy Local Retail

Amazon’s New Push for Same-Day Delivery Will Destroy Local Retail | Globalisation and interdependence | Scoop.it
Amazon has long enjoyed an unbeatable price advantage over its physical rivals. When I buy a $1,000 laptop from Wal-Mart, the company is required to collect local sales tax from me, so I pay almost $1,100 at checkout.

 

Just-in-Time production has reshaped the logistics of manufacturing.  How does same-day online delivery impact local retail businesses?  How might this change urban patterns of retail stores and of areas of warehouses?   


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Roland Trudeau Jr.'s comment, July 12, 2012 2:17 PM
People like to shop, not everyone but most. If there's one thing I've learned from being in retail all my working life it's that people need to hold and look and inspect something. Certainly you can return the item, but that takes time and sometimes extra money. The promise of physically seeing the item is better for most. The other side of the coin is people who simply can't get out or don't want to. For elderly or disabled who are computer literate they have ease of access and can just click on what they want to buy. Internet purchases unfortunately also are easier for fraud.. and it sounds to me that those lockers may be an even easier way for it to happen. Not to look on a darker side but that will increase sales too... for a short time anyway.