Globalisation and...
Follow
Find tag "environment"
1.9K views | +0 today
Globalisation and interdependence
Looking at the global interaction and interdependence
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Greenroom Dweller from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Climate Change Video Guide

Climate Change Video Guide | Globalisation and interdependence | Scoop.it
An in-depth, multimedia look at climate change, its global impact, and efforts to combat it.

 

This guide on climate change from the Council on Foreign Relations (independent think tank) covers many of the geopolitical, economic and environmental issues that confront the Earth as global temperatures rise.  Rather than produce a full length feature film, they have organized the this as an interactive video, allowing the user to get short (a couple of minutes) answer to specific questions about the science, foreign policy or economic ramifications of adapting to climate change. 

 

Tags: climate change, environmental adaption, economic, industry.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's comment, November 27, 2012 8:21 AM
Thanks for sharing this Giovanni!!
Giovanni Della Peruta's comment, November 27, 2012 8:38 AM
Thanks to you, Seth! :-)
Jose Sepulveda's comment, January 13, 2013 8:58 AM
Very good information, Thanks!
Rescooped by Greenroom Dweller from green infographics
Scoop.it!

A Core Set of Global Environmental Indicators

A Core Set of Global Environmental Indicators | Globalisation and interdependence | Scoop.it

To cut a long story short, if you leave below sea level or happen to be a polar bear, it’s time to pack up and move...


Via Lauren Moss
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Greenroom Dweller from green infographics
Scoop.it!

The Secret to a Sound Ocean

The Secret to a Sound Ocean | Globalisation and interdependence | Scoop.it
Acoustics mean different things to different species.

As humans, we need sound to hear our favorite music, the roar of the crowd and sirens so we don’t get flattened by a firetruck or freight train. While hearing is an enjoyable part of living a fulfilled life, we can get by without it.

Whales on the other hand, have a harder time. Whales are auditory creatures, meaning hearing is essential to their communication, navigation, feeding, and breeding.

Whales depend on sound in every aspect of their lives: from using echolocation to orient themselves in the dark waters, to emitting mating calls during breeding season, or just having a whale chat.

When container ships, oil tankers, and other large vessels travel through waters that are populated by whales, the ships produce noise that throws the whales into a state of disarray and messes with their activities and daily life. The sound is so strong, it would be as if you were at a party and someone blasted music so loud you couldn’t even hear each other speak — let alone try and mate. Sound is important to the whales, and creating a beautiful sounding ocean will help them in all their future endeavors...


Via Lauren Moss
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Greenroom Dweller from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Pavan Sukhdev: Put a value on nature!

TED Talks Every day, we use materials from the earth without thinking, for free. But what if we had to pay for their true value: would it make us more careful about what we use and what we waste?

 

Companies derive economic value from the environment without paying the true environmental costs of their enterprises.  Sukhdev call this the 'Economic Invisibilty of Nature.'  Many countries are mortgaging their environment's future for economic growth today.  This also disproportionately impacts the developing world and rural people more adversely.  Key to his argument is that we need to identify negative externalities on the environment that produce private profits and acknowledge them as public losses.  


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Ana Cristina Gil's curator insight, December 10, 2013 7:13 PM

This a very interesting topic. Most of the time we take our earth for granted imagine if we need to pay for every time we use our earth I don’t think we would to afford it. Is very important for us to take care of it. It so sad that we have to force to protect it; for example here in providence we get punish with a fine if we don’t recycle. Taking care of our world should be a feeling from within people shouldn’t be made to do it.

Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, December 12, 2013 1:15 AM

Nature is very important because everyone in the world depends on it because that is where we can get the oxygen that we need to live and also we can hunt for food because many people in this world do not have access to a supermarket because it is to far or they just don’t believe in the existence of a supermarket. I wonder why some people would decide to live so far from civilization because I could not do that. I would get depressed very quickly because there would be nothing to do there.

Rescooped by Greenroom Dweller from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Visualizing the Global Carbon Footprint

Visualizing the Global Carbon Footprint | Globalisation and interdependence | Scoop.it

One of the key things I reinforce in conversations about globalization is that the advantages are unevenly distributed and the negative externalities to the system are also unevenly distributed.  This clever infographic highlights both rather effectively. 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Dale Fraza's comment, February 27, 2012 3:26 PM
Really surprised at a couple things:
1. Brazil's relative tinyness in comparison with the U.S. Guess I've always just heard bad things about Brazil in regards to deforestation and the like.
2. Just how much a formerly agricultural nation (China) has exploded. Something really needs to be done about the environmental havoc they are wreaking (not to be a total ethnocentrist or anything).
Rescooped by Greenroom Dweller from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Climate Change and Sustainability

Climate Change and Sustainability | Globalisation and interdependence | Scoop.it

I'll let the comic (by Pulitzer cartoonist Joel Pett) speak for itself. 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Mr. David Burton's comment, April 16, 2012 9:19 PM
That's funny!
Seth Dixon's comment, April 16, 2012 10:01 PM
Too funny to keep to myself.
Rescooped by Greenroom Dweller from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

NASA Earth Observatory - Vegetation Index

The NDVI (Normalized Digital Vegetation Index) is on of the primary methods for detecting healthy vegetation using satellite imagery.  This also serves as a useful way to distinguish between distinct ecological and agricultural regions and the temporal patterns of planting seasons.  

 

This video was found on a site titled "Explorations in agricultural research" with many great links http://zerogravitygardening.blogspot.com/


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Greenroom Dweller from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Dramatic Greenland Ice Melt

Scientists capture dramatic footage of Arctic glaciers melting in hours Scientists have captured dramatic footage of massive lakes in the Arctic melting away...

 

An amazingly extreme place that is far removed from inhabited regions of our planet, but still heavily impacted by people nonetheless.  


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Josue Maroquin's comment, August 12, 2013 10:10 PM
It shows us how humanity impacts the planet wherever we are
Rescooped by Greenroom Dweller from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Extreme Weather and Drought Are Here to Stay

Extreme Weather and Drought Are Here to Stay | Globalisation and interdependence | Scoop.it
It is increasingly clear that we already live in the era of human-induced climate change, with unprecedented weather and climate extremes.

 

I don't delight in sharing the bad news.  So is this drought just a freak anomaly or a sign of a new normal?


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's comment, August 13, 2012 2:28 PM
The graphic was not connected to the article. It was linked on a PBS facebook page and I linked the juxtaposition of the graphic and the NY Times article. Here is the FB page: https://www.facebook.com/EarthTheOperatorsManual.Page Personally, an entire century as a baseline of comparison does not feel like cherrypicking data. True the Earth is an incredibly complex system that controlling for all variables is in essence impossible, but denying that the system has changed seems foolish to me. Why has the system changed? I'm okay with that being a reasonable debate worthy of academics.
Rescooped by Greenroom Dweller from green infographics
Scoop.it!

Infographic: The Growing E-Waste Situation

Infographic: The Growing E-Waste Situation | Globalisation and interdependence | Scoop.it

The waste created from discarded electronics is a significant environmental issue these days. This graphic, made for GOOD, was created to inform the world where our e-waste is originating and the whereabouts of its final resting place.


Via Lauren Moss
more...
CleanRiver Recycling Solutions's curator insight, April 4, 2014 4:59 PM

We are seeing more and more clients who are adding e-waste collection to their recycling programs, which is great because as this infographic shows, the issue of e-waste disposal is growing and an alarming amount of it is going straight into landfill!


Edit: Link seems to be broken. Try this one: http://www.columnfivemedia.com/work-items/infographic-the-growing-e-waste-situation

Rescooped by Greenroom Dweller from green infographics
Scoop.it!

Energy Needs

Energy Needs | Globalisation and interdependence | Scoop.it

"Welcome to Energy Realities, a visual guide to global energy needs, which shows how technology and intelligence are ensuring humanity continues to progress. The site combines maps, multimedia, and writing from three premier publishers and tells the story of energy use, production, sustainability on our planet. We invite you to explore and share this content to help increase understanding and dialogue about our world's energy needs."

 

Energy usage projects to be one of the great geograpical problems of our time.  As ideas such as sustainable economic growth enter the public consciousness, changes to the status quo seem as the more inevitable for the future.  That will the future of consumption look like?  What should it look like?


Via Seth Dixon, Lauren Moss
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Greenroom Dweller from green infographics
Scoop.it!

Global CO2 emissions

Animated time-lapse video of anthropogenic carbon dioxide emissions in map form, spanning the 18th century until this current first decade of the 21st centur...

 

This is not a complete data set, but the video still shows the striking connection between CO2 emissions and  the historical geography of industrialization.


Via Seth Dixon, Lauren Moss
more...
Seth Dixon's comment, August 2, 2012 2:21 PM
I'd love to take credit for this, but I didn't create this video, but am simply sharing a resource that I found online with the broader community. Follow the YouTube link to see info about the creator there (Cuagau1).
Mark V's comment, September 4, 2012 11:41 AM
Frightening and guilt inducing. The US and Europe the biggest historical violators, plus living in the northeastern part of the country which shows the highest concentrations.
Rafael CAYUELA's curator insight, February 3, 2014 3:18 PM

Interesting and well done..

Rescooped by Greenroom Dweller from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Sustainability explained through animation

Watch this short animated movie explaining sustainability created for RealEyes by Igloo Animations...

 


Via pdjmoo, Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Greenroom Dweller from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Imported Air Pollution from Outsourcing

Imported Air Pollution from Outsourcing | Globalisation and interdependence | Scoop.it

"Homegrown air pollution is bad enough, but for years scientists have tracked pollution rising out of Asia, crossing the Pacific Ocean, and descending over the western United States. A research team found that the Asian contribution over the southwestern United States could amount to 15 parts per billion of ozone (orange-red on three consecutive days in panels, left to right).  That could become even more troublesome, the authors note, if Asian imports increase as expected in the coming decades."

 

So in essence, sending manufacturing to China to avoid the Clean Air Act costs doesn't always lower our monetary costs nor does lower our environmental costs (not if our air is still polluted).  Geography is all about understanding the whole system, and the atmosphere does not recognize any international borders.  The Earth is our system. 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
The Kingdom Keepers's curator insight, November 26, 2013 9:50 AM

You know pollution is getting bad when it starts to affect countries oceans away. Society depicts that there is a pollution problem, but they do not take action-they merely address it. If humans are to find a solution to this problem, however, we need to actually take action.  

-Brooke

shamlabeth's curator insight, November 26, 2013 10:09 AM

I believe that Asia should think about what they are doing to the world. They are effecting the climate and the other countries with their burning of fossil fuels. It's not just them though because China is at the point where they have to wear mask out. we need to come together and make the world greener.-Amanda

Max Minard's curator insight, May 26, 10:06 PM

This article talks about air pollution hazards in America that are resulting from the pollution incoming from across the Pacific Ocean. Over the past few years, Asian imports have also increased the rate of incoming pollution that originated in Asia and is being distributed across the United States. As the article states, Asia's contribution could amount to "15 parts per billion of ozone." My insight would be to control this increase in pollution by perhaps limiting Asian and American interaction. Although, at the same time this interaction is probably necessary to the overall economies of both sides involved. This issue has both pros and cons linked with it, but either way the increase in pollution still needs to be solved. 

Rescooped by Greenroom Dweller from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

China now eats twice the meat we do

China now eats twice the meat we do | Globalisation and interdependence | Scoop.it
We can learn a lot from examining the way China's diet has changed in the last 20 years -- as well as its required efficiencies and the agriculture that supports it.

 

The United States still consumes more meat per capita than China, but as China's economy has grown (along with it's income and standard of living), the consumer habits have changed as well.  What will the impacts of the rise in Chinese meat consumption mean?   How do they get all this meat?  http://www.scoop.it/t/geography-education/p/1661841673/this-little-piggy-is-going-to-china


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Brett Sinica's curator insight, November 29, 2013 2:07 PM

This is actuallty very believable considering the population growth that China has experienced.  It only makes sense that the more people there are, the more meat will be consumed.  It is part of their cuisine to include meat.  Pork and chicken are among many of the popular proteins which are found on their dishes.  There is also the expansion to go along with all of the growth.  The landscape of the eastern part of the country has become more agriculturally accomodating for crops and livestock alike.  Therefore to match the trend of growing population, is the need to match it with meat and other foods.

Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, April 14, 2014 6:25 PM

China now eats twice as much meat than America. However, this chart does not touch upon "per-capita" which plays a major role in where the food is being dispersed and consumed. 

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 15, 2014 1:55 PM

China's meat demand is being met by importing meat. As the standard of living rises more of China's population are looking to branch out in regards to their diet, what is interesting is that this is also an example of cultures blending. Food is a great indicator of cultural diffusion. As China becomes more globalized we are seeing their diet and consumption patterns becoming less local and tradition.

Rescooped by Greenroom Dweller from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Satellites Reveal Sudden Greenland Ice Melt

Satellites Reveal Sudden Greenland Ice Melt | Globalisation and interdependence | Scoop.it
NASA researchers are expressing concern about something they've never seen before: the melting of ice across nearly the entire surface of Greenland earlier this month.

 

Climate changes are afoot in the Arctic and the Greenland ice sheet.  For more on the Arctic. In related news, Texas and Louisiana have introduced education standards that require educators to teach climate change denial as a valid scientific position. South Dakota and Utah passed resolutions denying climate change. Tennessee and Oklahoma also have introduced legislation to give climate change skeptics a place in the classroom.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Sarah Curtis's comment, September 3, 2012 3:33 PM
I didn't know how bad global warming was until I read this article and I don't think many people realize it either. We need to start changing our ways if we want to live in a safe and healthy environment. I think more people need to see images and read articles like this so they have a better knowledge on how little time we have.
Morgan Halsey's comment, September 10, 2012 11:30 PM
Some people still don't believe in global warming, but now with new technology, there is great evidence. New technology has allowed us to explore our world in ways that we have not been able to before. We are now able see things about our world and fix problems before they become worse.
Michael Grant's comment, September 12, 2012 4:12 PM
I am surprised about how the polar ice caps are melting and that global warming is very real, but on the other hand it's just part of the Earth maturing
Rescooped by Greenroom Dweller from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Global CO2 emissions

Animated time-lapse video of anthropogenic carbon dioxide emissions in map form, spanning the 18th century until this current first decade of the 21st centur...

 

This is not a complete data set, but the video still shows the striking connection between CO2 emissions and  the historical geography of industrialization.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's comment, August 2, 2012 2:21 PM
I'd love to take credit for this, but I didn't create this video, but am simply sharing a resource that I found online with the broader community. Follow the YouTube link to see info about the creator there (Cuagau1).
Mark V's comment, September 4, 2012 11:41 AM
Frightening and guilt inducing. The US and Europe the biggest historical violators, plus living in the northeastern part of the country which shows the highest concentrations.
Rafael CAYUELA's curator insight, February 3, 2014 3:18 PM

Interesting and well done..