Globalisation and interdependence
2.3K views | +0 today
Follow
Globalisation and interdependence
Looking at the global interaction and interdependence
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Greenroom Dweller from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

New Trailer for "Two Million Minutes"

"This trailer shows the first 3 minutes of the actual film Two Million Minutes." Recommended by an APHG teacher. 


This film shows the lives of high school students in India, China and the US and how globalization is impacting them and education. 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Haley 's comment, August 29, 2011 8:18 AM
Please let me know if you would like resources for this film. I have a few. forsythh@pcsb.org
Rescooped by Greenroom Dweller from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Pavan Sukhdev: Put a value on nature!

TED Talks Every day, we use materials from the earth without thinking, for free. But what if we had to pay for their true value: would it make us more careful about what we use and what we waste?

 

Companies derive economic value from the environment without paying the true environmental costs of their enterprises.  Sukhdev call this the 'Economic Invisibilty of Nature.'  Many countries are mortgaging their environment's future for economic growth today.  This also disproportionately impacts the developing world and rural people more adversely.  Key to his argument is that we need to identify negative externalities on the environment that produce private profits and acknowledge them as public losses.  


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Ana Cristina Gil's curator insight, December 10, 2013 7:13 PM

This a very interesting topic. Most of the time we take our earth for granted imagine if we need to pay for every time we use our earth I don’t think we would to afford it. Is very important for us to take care of it. It so sad that we have to force to protect it; for example here in providence we get punish with a fine if we don’t recycle. Taking care of our world should be a feeling from within people shouldn’t be made to do it.

Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, December 12, 2013 1:15 AM

Nature is very important because everyone in the world depends on it because that is where we can get the oxygen that we need to live and also we can hunt for food because many people in this world do not have access to a supermarket because it is to far or they just don’t believe in the existence of a supermarket. I wonder why some people would decide to live so far from civilization because I could not do that. I would get depressed very quickly because there would be nothing to do there.

Rescooped by Greenroom Dweller from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Shake the Dust

This trailer for the documentary 'Shake the Dust' shows the globalization of youth culture and the diffusion of the creative art known as break dancing. This film challenges its developed-world viewers to reconceptualize how they perceive the lives of people living in the developing world as more than just poverty and misery, but to see the humanity and joy. In this 12 minute clip, you'll see portrayals of teenagers in Uganda and Yemen who are a part of cultural institutions and can be agents for change within their society and even political forces.  For more information about the documentary, visit: http://www.shakethedust.org


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Greenroom Dweller from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Frozen Planet - An Interactive Exploration of the Poles

Frozen Planet - An Interactive Exploration of the Poles | Globalisation and interdependence | Scoop.it

Very cool way to explore the colder realms of our planet.  This web-based "Google Earth-like" resource comes preloaded with layers  (ice extent, temperature, permafrost, biogeography, etc.) that would make for a great interactive lesson for many grade levels. 


Via Carla Saunders, Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Greenroom Dweller from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Sustainability explained through animation

Watch this short animated movie explaining sustainability created for RealEyes by Igloo Animations...

 


Via pdjmoo, Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Greenroom Dweller from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Next Supercontinent Will Amaze You

Next Supercontinent Will Amaze You | Globalisation and interdependence | Scoop.it
Fifty million to 200 million years from now, geologists expect Earth's continents to smash together into one big supercontinent, just as they've done repeatedly in our planet's distant past — and a new computer model suggests that the Arctic Ocean...

 

This graphic displays the fluidity of the plate tectonic systems, and instead of thinking about what happened during the era of the dinosaurs, looking into the future provides an interesting perspective the dynamism of Earth systems (Disclaimer: this is one possibility on what might happen, there are other possible outcomes).  In human geography, I use this map to discussion the concept of region: regions are not static, but the the Earth is put together is (sometimes literally) shifting beneath our feet. 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Jason Schneider's curator insight, January 29, 2015 1:12 AM

The continental drift shows that 225 million years ago, Africa, Asia & Europe, North America and South America were touching while Antarctica and Australia were really close to those 5 continents. These 7 continents together were known as Pangea. 125 million years later North America, Africa and Europe elevated north in terms of latitude but to sum it up, North America, South America, Africa and Europe all drifted north in the world. Let's jump ahead 50 million to 200 million years from now. North America, South America, Europe and Africa can quite possibly all drift northward. As for Asia, the only difference between 225 million years ago and now is that Asia drifted east and barely drifted north. Also, I feel that Australia will barely make it to the equator since it barely drifted northward throughout the past 225 million years.

Rescooped by Greenroom Dweller from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Asia is the world's largest petroleum consumer

Asia is the world's largest petroleum consumer | Globalisation and interdependence | Scoop.it
Energy Information Administration - EIA - Official Energy Statistics from the U.S.

 

This goes nicely with the carbon footprint data that was recently posted.  Although that was data aggregated at the national level and this is on the 'world realms' level, many of the same patterns are visible without the same specificity. 


Via syarifah dalimunthe, Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Greenroom Dweller from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Imported Air Pollution from Outsourcing

Imported Air Pollution from Outsourcing | Globalisation and interdependence | Scoop.it

"Homegrown air pollution is bad enough, but for years scientists have tracked pollution rising out of Asia, crossing the Pacific Ocean, and descending over the western United States. A research team found that the Asian contribution over the southwestern United States could amount to 15 parts per billion of ozone (orange-red on three consecutive days in panels, left to right).  That could become even more troublesome, the authors note, if Asian imports increase as expected in the coming decades."

 

So in essence, sending manufacturing to China to avoid the Clean Air Act costs doesn't always lower our monetary costs nor does lower our environmental costs (not if our air is still polluted).  Geography is all about understanding the whole system, and the atmosphere does not recognize any international borders.  The Earth is our system. 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
The Kingdom Keepers's curator insight, November 26, 2013 9:50 AM

You know pollution is getting bad when it starts to affect countries oceans away. Society depicts that there is a pollution problem, but they do not take action-they merely address it. If humans are to find a solution to this problem, however, we need to actually take action.  

-Brooke

shamlabeth's curator insight, November 26, 2013 10:09 AM

I believe that Asia should think about what they are doing to the world. They are effecting the climate and the other countries with their burning of fossil fuels. It's not just them though because China is at the point where they have to wear mask out. we need to come together and make the world greener.-Amanda

Max Minard's curator insight, May 26, 2015 10:06 PM

This article talks about air pollution hazards in America that are resulting from the pollution incoming from across the Pacific Ocean. Over the past few years, Asian imports have also increased the rate of incoming pollution that originated in Asia and is being distributed across the United States. As the article states, Asia's contribution could amount to "15 parts per billion of ozone." My insight would be to control this increase in pollution by perhaps limiting Asian and American interaction. Although, at the same time this interaction is probably necessary to the overall economies of both sides involved. This issue has both pros and cons linked with it, but either way the increase in pollution still needs to be solved. 

Rescooped by Greenroom Dweller from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Perpetual Ocean by NASA

NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center Scientific Visualization Studio — the same team that recently brought us an animation of the moon as it will appear from Earth for each hour of 2012 — has also released a stunning video called “Perpetual Ocean,” a time lapse of the world’s ocean currents as calculated by the ECCO2 computational model.

 

This is an stunning visualization of ocean currents.  Thanks for the suggestion! 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Michelle Carvajal's curator insight, December 11, 2012 9:10 PM

This video is pretty awesome! I love how it shows the different ways that the currents move around the continents and in mid ocean. How are we not to expect for natural phenomenoms to be unpredictable when our oceansa re the same. i would have never expected to see so many idfferent flows and currents but they do exist. It gives you a look into how are planet works and also gives you a chilling thought of how easily a ship would get lost in deep ocean waters. - M. Carvajal

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 15, 2014 4:39 PM

This is an amazing video. The technology we have at our disposable is truly remarkable and we have reached a point where mapping all the currents of the ocean can be done and put up on youtube. This information is available to people who otherwise would have no idea how to interpret ocean currents.

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, December 16, 2014 10:18 AM

This video shows just how technology is advancing, being able to show how the world's water currents move and, especially, showing how different our bodies of water are. I always thought the currents were somehow connected, but now I see that many move in their own way.

Rescooped by Greenroom Dweller from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Ultimate factories: Coca Cola

nat geo programme about the coke factory and the manufacturing process of coke...

 

Where is Coca Cola produced?  Some products are bulk losing some are bulk gaining in the manufacturing process.  Coca Cola and their containers represent bulk gaining products.  Although not the focus of this video, what is the geography behind where these factories are located?  How would this geographic pattern change if this were are bulk losing industry?  What are examples of bulk gaining and bulk losing industries?  Why are glass bottles not manufactured in the United States? 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Madison Roth's curator insight, January 20, 7:58 PM
This video relates to my current AP human geography class because we are learning about industries and it is speaking of the coke industry. This, more specifically, is a bulk-gaining industry and is placed strategically based on all factors (situation and site). I think that the coca-cola industries are growing rapidly as stated in the video. Also, that the plants are placed nicely (closer to consumers to avoid transportation costs) taking into consideration the amount of coke needed to be produced and the countless factories relative to each other.
Angel Peeples's curator insight, January 20, 8:03 PM
  This is related to world cultural geography by being an industry. A industry is a economic activity concerned with the processing of raw materials and manufacture of goods in factories. Coca Cola is a huge industry that makes billions of dollars a year, 1.6 billion people reaches for a coca cola a day! This industry is a bulk gaining industry, the ingredients don't weight that much but when you put it all together it weighs quite a lot because of this the transportation cost would be to great for going a long distance so they must be closer to the markets instead of the inputs. This article is mostly about how Coca Cola is made and about all the factories worldwide to meet their growing demand.   
Rebecca Cooler's curator insight, January 20, 9:45 PM
This article relates to the topic because in human geography industries are described as either bulk gaining or bulk reducing. My opinion on the topic is that this would be a bulk gaining industry because it's adding bulk.
Rescooped by Greenroom Dweller from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Shanghai: 1990 vs. 2010

Shanghai: 1990 vs. 2010 | Globalisation and interdependence | Scoop.it

Globalization has hit...hard and fast. 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Matt Ramsdell's curator insight, December 14, 2015 4:19 PM

Shanghai China, a global transportatio hub has grown tremendously into a megaity within 20 years. This is due to the high imports and the location on the river. This created a high import rate and a low wage rate. Because of this they were able to build this city into a megacity.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 14, 2015 8:22 PM
Wow! All I can say is Wow! Shanghai overall in every way is highly indistinguishable from what it was in 1990. On the far side it is minimally developed and on the close side it has what looks to be a fairly modern city for the 90s. Take a jump twenty years and it is as if it was built the way it looks currently Even the side closest that was developed in the 90s, looks like it was scrapped and rebuilt to be even more modern, a mega city. Because of its strategic location and has a river for transportation, it is a transportation hub, which is why it has the money to do what it does.
Alex Vielman's curator insight, December 15, 2015 12:46 AM

These two images are perhaps a goo example of how globalization has developed over Shanghai in just 20 years. The images show how once greener and more spacious the region looked before in 1990, and the other image shows how technology has developed and become an important priority to the people. There are huge tall buildings located in the area and the other natural source seen is the body of water surrounding some of the tallest buildings in the area. There is no longer any trees which is also a sign of how un-important or how simple to was for the Shanghai to knock them down to simply make more buildings. The concept shows how business has developed in the region but also shows the potentially jobs located here as well. Overall, this part of Shanghai is very economically stable but it is also important to see outside of the heart of the buildings. 

Rescooped by Greenroom Dweller from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Climate Change and Sustainability

Climate Change and Sustainability | Globalisation and interdependence | Scoop.it

I'll let the comic (by Pulitzer cartoonist Joel Pett) speak for itself. 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Mr. David Burton's comment, April 16, 2012 9:19 PM
That's funny!
Seth Dixon's comment, April 16, 2012 10:01 PM
Too funny to keep to myself.
Rescooped by Greenroom Dweller from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Once a Producer, China is now a Consumer

China is now the world's largest car market, and a crucial one for Detroit companies. Chinese consumers bought 18.5 million vehicles last year, and foreigners, especially Americans, have played a key role in developing the industry.

 

China now is the world's largest auto market as China is no longer simply a place where things are produced.  China has become a major consumer of goods as their workers wages allow them to consume more goods. 

 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Meagan Harpin's curator insight, October 9, 2013 1:00 PM

China has become the worlds largest car market and General motors planned to open another 600 dealerships because it sells more cars in China then it does in the US. China have even become a bigger consumer in of goods, when this atricle was released they were purchasing 18.5 million worth of goods. That has alot to do with the increased pay they are now recieving as well.  

Rebecca Farrea's curator insight, October 21, 2013 12:56 PM

This is an interesting headline and topic because so many Americans blame China for job loss, when in reality, China is no longer at the forefront of manufacturing and industry.  China is consuming from foreign markets, such as the United States, just as it has been producing and manufacturing goods.

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 15, 2014 2:07 PM

The car culture in the United States has made us a very lucrative customer for foreign auto industries. Our infrastructure is build around the automobile, we built our highway system, suburban communities and other support systems to encourage auto use. In China, they may need to consider the way their countries is structured and whether or not heavy automobile use will be functional. In Jakarta we see massive traffic jams because they are not equipped to handle more people driving to work.

Rescooped by Greenroom Dweller from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Global Concerns Classroom: Empowering Youth to take Global Action

Global Concerns Classroom:          Empowering Youth to take Global Action | Globalisation and interdependence | Scoop.it

For as much as geographic education "discusses" global issues and problems, we geography teachers often don't demonstrate how to make a different.   This site helps teachers show students how to make use of their education.

 

"I can't help everyone everywhere, but I can help someone somewhere."  That's the starting point for global awareness. 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Greenroom Dweller from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

A global culture to fight extremism

TED Talks Why do transnational extremist organizations succeed where democratic movements have a harder time taking hold?

 

Globalization cut both ways.  Maajid Nawaz discusses how social movements use ideas, narratives, symbols and leaders through borderless technologies, to create transnational identities.  This has lead to highly sophisticated extremist organizations in Muslim-majority societies (and the speaker was a participant in that for 13 years).  Isolated extremist are now globally connected.  Given the Arab spring, how can these tools strengthen democratic social movements? 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Greenroom Dweller from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Pangaea

Pangaea - the idea of Pangaea and some of the evidence behind it... 

 

This is a video produced by Khan Academy, which is a key resource and proponent for the 'flipped classroom.'  While they do not have many human geography resources (math is their specialty) they do have several video designed for teaching physical geography including this one that covers


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Michelle Winemiller's curator insight, January 22, 2015 2:22 PM

great source with the video information and fossil evidence for students to get good reinforcement

Rescooped by Greenroom Dweller from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

The new geography of trade: Globalization’s decline may stimulate local recovery

The new geography of trade: Globalization’s decline may stimulate local recovery | Globalisation and interdependence | Scoop.it

Many hold it as an article of faith that global trade will be an ever-growing presence in the world. Yet this belief rests on shaky foundations. Global trade depends on cheap, long-distance freight transportation. Freight costs will rise with climate change, the end of cheap oil, and policies to mitigate these two challenges.

At first, the increase in freight costs will be bad news for developed and developing nations alike but, as adjustments in the patterns of trade occur, the result is likely to be decreased outsourcing with more manufacturing and food production jobs in North America and the European Union. The pattern of trade will change as increasing transportation costs outweigh traditional sources of comparative advantage, such as lower wages.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Greenroom Dweller from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

What are Continents?

This is not as straightforward a question as you might think. 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Greenroom Dweller from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

West Africa: Slavery in the Chocolate Industry

Although slavery is no longer legal there are still millions of people living in slavery today. One place and industry where slaves still exist is the cocoa ...

 

The world's leading producer of cocoa is Côte d'Ivoire and dirty secret is that slavery is commonplace on cocoa plantations in West Africa.    Children are smuggled from countries such as Mali, Niger and Burkina Faso and then are placed on remote, isolated plantations.  While statistics are all guesstimates, this video is purporting that 35% of the world's chocolate is produced by slave labor (I've seen higher estimates).  What factors lead to this horrific condition?  How is this a geographic issue?    


Via Seth Dixon
more...
AnthonyAcosta/NoahMata's curator insight, April 8, 2015 1:36 PM

 (Social)

 

Chocolate is a very known thing in first world countries and is not known for what is needed to make it. So in Africa they smuggle children from various places in Africa and force them to labor for cocoa beans and work on plantations. Many young children near there   Teen ages are taken and put through labor for most of there young lives.

Martin Kemp's curator insight, December 17, 2015 3:13 PM

i mainly find it amazing that slavery is still so commonplace in parts of the world. whether it is "illegal" or not is irrelivent in these parts of the world and child labor and slavery is such a dominating force in labor.

8A JonathanS's curator insight, February 16, 7:55 AM
This article and YouTube clip is talking about the child labor and modern slavery going on in West Africa. These regions are mostly used for cocoa bean plantations and harvesting. The guy leading this investigation also interviews people who are in charge of the chocolate making factories and asks them where the cocoa beans come from. Almost everyone answers, "the Ivory Coast" and have no idea what so ever what is actually going on there. They just order the amount of beans needed and have no clue what children have to go through to provide these people what they need. In this documentary they also interview some of the children having to go through this and it's very terrible and wrong. These children get taken away from their homes to work and get tricked that they're getting payed even though they don't get anything for all they do. In this clip I also get to see what the owners of the cocoa bean plantations say about what's going on and all the lies are just so silly and I cant believe what their thinking and why they're doing this.

This article connects a lot to what we've been working with in class. We even saw this movie about cocoa farms spread all over Wast Africa and this movie basically talked about the same things the other movie talked about. I enjoyed this movie a lot. Even though the information given was very sad and heart breaking I learned a lot of new things about the conditions of these slaves and and what they actually have to go through to please their "master" and how sad their lives are. When seeing this movie I just felt so bad and I just feel like I want to help these people so much.  
Rescooped by Greenroom Dweller from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Visualizing the Global Carbon Footprint

Visualizing the Global Carbon Footprint | Globalisation and interdependence | Scoop.it

One of the key things I reinforce in conversations about globalization is that the advantages are unevenly distributed and the negative externalities to the system are also unevenly distributed.  This clever infographic highlights both rather effectively. 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Dale Fraza's comment, February 27, 2012 3:26 PM
Really surprised at a couple things:
1. Brazil's relative tinyness in comparison with the U.S. Guess I've always just heard bad things about Brazil in regards to deforestation and the like.
2. Just how much a formerly agricultural nation (China) has exploded. Something really needs to be done about the environmental havoc they are wreaking (not to be a total ethnocentrist or anything).
Rescooped by Greenroom Dweller from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

How do you tell which car is more American?

How do you tell which car is more American? | Globalisation and interdependence | Scoop.it
Joe Luehrmann likes American cars, has owned a string of them and is considering buying another. But he faces a problem in trying to figure out what's American anymore.

 

The globalization of industrial output and manufacturing had erased much of the meaning between 'foreign' and 'domestic' products.  Is it foreign if the company is headquartered in Japan, but has a manufacturing plant in California?  Is it domestic is Detroit company produces the car the maquiladora region of Northern Mexico?  This doesn't even address this issue that any one vehicle has parts that are literally made all over the world.  Interestingly truck buyers are seen as the more patriotic, and companies emphasize their "Americanness" to cater to the cultural and economic sensibilities of their key demographic.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Greenroom Dweller from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

International Fast Food Consumption

International Fast Food Consumption | Globalisation and interdependence | Scoop.it

This cartogram shows the distribution of one major fast food outlet brand (McDonalds's). By 2004 there were 30,496 of these McDonald's worldwide with 45% located in the United States.  The next highest number of these outlets are in Japan, Canada and Germany.

 

The world average number of outlets of this one brand alone is 5 per million people. In the United States there are 47 per million people; in Argentina and Chile the rate is a tenth of the American rate; the rate in Indonesia, China and Georgia is a hundredth of the American rate. In all the territories of Africa there were only 150 outlets: mostly in South Africa.  What does this say about consumption, economics, development, globalization and branding? Search http://worldmapper.org for more excellent cartograms. 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Edelin Espino's curator insight, December 5, 2014 11:08 AM

No wonder America is the biggest one. People here are mostly too busy to prepare proper food for their diet. Is easier and more efficient just stop by and go back to work as soon as possibly. 

Rescooped by Greenroom Dweller from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Texas Storm Was Over Eight Miles High

Texas Storm Was Over Eight Miles High | Globalisation and interdependence | Scoop.it
The astonishing power of Mother Nature....

 

3D NASA images show the magnitude of last week's storm in Texas was immense, vertically towering 8 miles above the Texas landscape.  The storm "spawning 14 tornadoes and golf ball sized hail was immense...[NASA's] Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite watched the storm develop and measured its cloud height at above eight miles high." 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Greenroom Dweller from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Agriculture is Everywhere

Farmers Fight is a student-led initiative to reconnect American society to the world of agriculture. Beginning with university students, Farmers Fight encour...

 

This video makes several important points about agricultural production within our modernized world, things that often go unnoticed and taken for granted.  Food for thought. 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Lauren Sellers's curator insight, February 27, 2014 11:58 AM

The video brings attention to the complex process that brings food, and sheets, into our lives. Agriculture is often overlooked and undesirable. The video gives a young face to agriculture.

 

Payton Sidney Dinwiddie 's curator insight, October 25, 2014 6:27 PM

I like this article because it shows that most of the things we do is related to agriculture there are so many things we take for granted  and things that people dont recongnize have to deal with agriculture its almost surprising after watching this I believe that people who do agriculture need more respect

Bella The Non-Vampire's curator insight, December 1, 2014 5:11 AM

Agriculture involves everyone. People today dont think about where their food comes from. They don't think about how their food is made. Which is all agriculture.  Now agriculture has faded where no one remembers it still exists. Agriculture is something we include in our daizly lives. The big process of food. 

I.C.

Rescooped by Greenroom Dweller from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

A Third Industrial Revolution

A Third Industrial Revolution | Globalisation and interdependence | Scoop.it
OUTSIDE THE SPRAWLING Frankfurt Messe, home of innumerable German trade fairs, stands the “Hammering Man”, a 21-metre kinetic statue that steadily raises and lowers its arm to bash a piece of metal with a...

 

This article argues that as manufacturing increasing becomes a digital production, more goods will be produced in the more developed countries.  If events unfold in this fashion, globalization and many other patterns with be significantly altered.  Would this make a better world?  For whom?    


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Al Picozzi's curator insight, July 27, 2013 9:54 AM

Seems to be that this might lead to further job loss by qualified individuals as machines are desigining and building machines and also with the advent of 3-D printing anyone at home can build a hammer as said in the article.  Also take a look at http://defdist.org/ now you can make your own 3-d gun.  Im not against gun ownership, but this opens the gate to too many people in my opinion.

Jacqueline Landry's curator insight, December 17, 2013 7:20 PM

manufacturing is becoming more and more machines rather than humans, this leaves people without jobs to support their families. It is cheaper to have a machine run the production line rather than a person. This also helps the amount of production that is completed, machines go a bit faster. But I think not every job should be a machine, there is always faulty machines but there isn't anything better than a human with common sense.