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Globalisation and interdependence
Looking at the global interaction and interdependence
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Intro to Energy: A Global Picture

Intro to Energy: A Global Picture | Globalisation and interdependence | Scoop.it
A global picture of energy supply, demand, and trends.

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Which nations are really responsible for climate change - interactive

Which nations are really responsible for climate change - interactive | Globalisation and interdependence | Scoop.it
There are many ways to view the world's carbon emissions: by national totals or emissions per person; by current carbon output or historical emissions; by production of greenhouse gases or consumption of goods and services; by absolute emissions or economic carbon intensity.

Our interactive map allows you to browse all of these different measurements, each of which provides a different insight. Together they highlight the complexity of divvying up responsibility for climate change and highlight some of the tensions at the heart of the global climate negotiations.


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The kingdom of fraud: Global economic crime [infographic]

The kingdom of fraud: Global economic crime [infographic] | Globalisation and interdependence | Scoop.it

Economic crime can mean anything from old-fashioned embezzlement to the growing incidence of cybercrime. What kinds of crimes are most common in the business world, and where do they happen most often?


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Bikes Can Save Us! [infographic]

Bikes Can Save Us! [infographic] | Globalisation and interdependence | Scoop.it

Today’s infographic, How Bikes Can Save Us, suggests that by switching from gas guzzling cars to fat burning bikes we can do more than help the planet, we can help ourselves. Isn’t that nice? We can be selfish while still helping out the planet that is nice enough to house even though we just shit all over it. Anyway enjoy today’s infographic and keep sharing!


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Energy Needs

Energy Needs | Globalisation and interdependence | Scoop.it

"Welcome to Energy Realities, a visual guide to global energy needs, which shows how technology and intelligence are ensuring humanity continues to progress. The site combines maps, multimedia, and writing from three premier publishers and tells the story of energy use, production, sustainability on our planet. We invite you to explore and share this content to help increase understanding and dialogue about our world's energy needs."

 

Energy usage projects to be one of the great geograpical problems of our time.  As ideas such as sustainable economic growth enter the public consciousness, changes to the status quo seem as the more inevitable for the future.  That will the future of consumption look like?  What should it look like?


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Footspotting: Global Carbon Footprint Infographic

Footspotting: Global Carbon Footprint Infographic | Globalisation and interdependence | Scoop.it

As Sustainability month draws to a close, we've dug up a gem from the Coroflot archives: Stanford Kay's excellent infographic of global carbon emissions.

Kay's design succeeds in representing a potentially overwhelming set of data on several levels: some 200+ different countries are represented by bubbles, color-coded by continent, where the size of each is proportional to its carbon emissions.

Moreover, the arrangement of the bubbles completes the metaphor, adding a further dimension of scale to the graphic: it is difficult, if not impossible, to see the big picture when one is perusing the names of the individual countries. Thus, Kay's infographic also reminds us not to miss the forest for the trees.


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Infographic: Trash and Recycling Trends

Infographic: Trash and Recycling Trends | Globalisation and interdependence | Scoop.it

Ever wondered how much trash you create over the course of a year? The amount may surprise you! This infographic to show you the dirty details on just how much garbage is generated and recycled across the globe...


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America and the West’s dirty little secret

America and the West’s dirty little secret | Globalisation and interdependence | Scoop.it
By importing goods from polluting factories in Asia, Americans and others in developed countries underwrite carbon emissions...

 

This is a compelling question: are reductions in greenhouse gases best measured by production or consumption?  The question that this article is posing is essentially trying to find blame for greenhouse gas emmision, but thinking geographically, ponders where along the commodity chain should the bulk of the blame be placed.  What do you think?  


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Greendex: Survey of Sustainable Consumption | National Geographic

Greendex: Survey of Sustainable Consumption | National Geographic | Globalisation and interdependence | Scoop.it

You've heard about it for years—everyone’s interested in green. Do you know how your personal choices add up- or the choices of fellow citizens? What behaviors are people adopting globally with a positive impact on environmental sustainability? What's changed- or not- in recent years?

 

This is the fourth year National Geographic has partnered with GlobeScan to develop an international research approach to measure and monitor consumer progress toward environmentally sustainable consumption. The key objectives of this unique consumer tracking survey are to provide regular quantitative measures of consumer behavior and to promote sustainable consumption...


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Ocean Health Study Raises Concerns, Offers Some Hope

Ocean Health Study Raises Concerns, Offers Some Hope | Globalisation and interdependence | Scoop.it

A comprehensive study of global oceanic health gave the world’s oceans a score of 60 out of 100.

The Ocean Health Index, produced by an international team of scientists, policymakers, and conservationists, assessed the vitality of 171 coastal countries and territorial regions in ten categories, including ecological characteristics such as “Coastal Protection,” “Biodiversity,” and sustainable seafood harvests, and economic qualities like “Coastal Livelihoods and Economies” and “Tourism and Recreation.”

The study is “the first comprehensive global measurement of ocean health that includes people as part of the ocean ecosystem,” and is designed to help strengthen national and regional efforts to preserve our coastal environments and evaluate marine health...


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Arctic sea ice before and after record low – interactive map

Arctic sea ice before and after record low – interactive map | Globalisation and interdependence | Scoop.it

Arctic sea ice has reached its lowest ever recorded extent, in 'dramatic changes', which signal that man-made global warming is having a major impact on the polar region.

Drag the slider across the map to see how the ice has shrunk between 1979 and 2012 in the interactive map at the article link.


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VIDEO: "The World is Flat"

VIDEO: "The World is Flat" | Globalisation and interdependence | Scoop.it

A lengthy (1h, 15m) video, where New York Times columnist and author Thomas Friedman explains his ideas about globalization, as laid out in his book "The World is Flat."  This was filmed as a keynote address from M.I.T. and also can show students in high school the vibrant intellectual life available on college campuses.    


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New Balance struggles as last major athletic shoe brand still manufacturing in U.S.

New Balance struggles as last major athletic shoe brand still manufacturing in U.S. | Globalisation and interdependence | Scoop.it

"Nike? Gone. Adidas? Gone. New Balance, the last major athletic shoe brand still manufacturing in the United States, fights to keep jobs here."   This is an excellent portal for discussing outsourcing, deindutrialization, sectors of the economy and globalization. 


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Stacey Jackson's comment, February 7, 2013 5:51 PM
I had no idea that New Balance still manufactured their shoes in the US. Sadly, I assumed they were made overseas as most textiles are these days. I'll have to go out and buy a pair of New Balances now.
Cam E's curator insight, January 29, 2:03 PM

The United States, known for its industrial prowess in the past, has become a shadow of what it used to be. Our economy has taken a major turn to a majority service oriented one, with about 70 percent of our GDP coming from Consumption rather than production. Even since the year 2000 the US has lost around 32 percent of its manufacturing jobs. All that can be said through my limited knowledge on the topic is that a nation which switches from production to consumption will likely fall behind others on the path of technological advancement.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, October 1, 11:10 PM

Unit 6

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Global Greenhouse Pollution Surge Continues

Global Greenhouse Pollution Surge Continues | Globalisation and interdependence | Scoop.it
The United Nations World Meteorological Organization (WMO) reports that greenhouse pollution continues to build in the global atmosphere at a terrifying rate.

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Our Global Footprint

Our Global Footprint | Globalisation and interdependence | Scoop.it

All of us depend on nature to live. In some ways, Earth’s bounty is like a bank account, which is recharged, for instance by sun-powered plant growth. Against this account, we—as individuals, as nations, and as a global community—are constantly making withdrawals.

But as human numbers and activities increase, we spend more and more against nature’s account. Are we withdrawing at a rate that exceeds nature’s ability to recharge this account? Are we able to maintain a positive balance?


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Land use poses a critical impact on local climate change

Land use poses a critical impact on local climate change | Globalisation and interdependence | Scoop.it

Clearing forests, installing pavement, planting crops and other land use decisions may be among the most important factors in impacting local climate change.

These decisions impact evaporation, solar radiation and other biophysical effects that may have more impact on local climate than greenhouse gases, which have a more global climate impact.


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How Much CO2 Is Created By… | GE Data Visualization

Charging you cellphone or preparing a cup of tea: play around with this visualization to find out how much carbon is released by various activities!


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Climate Change Infographics: Sea Level Rise

Climate Change Infographics: Sea Level Rise | Globalisation and interdependence | Scoop.it
Infographics have been popping up everywhere lately. A combination of image and information (often as graphs and charts), they are a great way to present.

Over coming weeks I hope to feature infographics regarding climate change, nature and health, along with some background information about their design and use.

The first one, showing the predicted effects of sea level rise on the world’s major cities, comes from Keeping our head above water | GDS Publishing.


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Some Like it Cold: effects of global warming

Some Like it Cold: effects of global warming | Globalisation and interdependence | Scoop.it

Polar regions have suffered dramatically the consequences of global warming: ice melting, rising temperatures and the consequent transformation of flora and fauna are just few of the deep changes that marked these regions in an irreversible manner and will influence future human life and activities.
This visualization aims to highlight the main factors that have brought these changes. The top graph shows the relationships data between temperature, carbon dioxide concentration & sea-ice in the last century- we have then developed two different future trends.
The polar regions system map, designed as the structure of an ice crystal, shows the complex tangle of relationships and flows, highlighting the importance of each element for the whole system's balance.
Ice is in the centre of the visualization, as it’s the core of the entire polar environment and influences all other characters, while on the top are greenhouse gases- the primary responsible of increasing temperature and of climatic mutation in Arctic and Antarctic.
The analysis shows crearly how polar regions heavily suffer a phenomenon to which they contribute minimally, but provoking chilling consequences which involve the whole world...


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The Secret to a Sound Ocean

The Secret to a Sound Ocean | Globalisation and interdependence | Scoop.it
Acoustics mean different things to different species.

As humans, we need sound to hear our favorite music, the roar of the crowd and sirens so we don’t get flattened by a firetruck or freight train. While hearing is an enjoyable part of living a fulfilled life, we can get by without it.

Whales on the other hand, have a harder time. Whales are auditory creatures, meaning hearing is essential to their communication, navigation, feeding, and breeding.

Whales depend on sound in every aspect of their lives: from using echolocation to orient themselves in the dark waters, to emitting mating calls during breeding season, or just having a whale chat.

When container ships, oil tankers, and other large vessels travel through waters that are populated by whales, the ships produce noise that throws the whales into a state of disarray and messes with their activities and daily life. The sound is so strong, it would be as if you were at a party and someone blasted music so loud you couldn’t even hear each other speak — let alone try and mate. Sound is important to the whales, and creating a beautiful sounding ocean will help them in all their future endeavors...


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Breathing Earth: CO2 rates by country in real-time

Breathing Earth: CO2 rates by country in real-time | Globalisation and interdependence | Scoop.it
A visual real-time simulation that displays the carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions, birth rates, and death rates of every country in the world.

Breathing Earth, a real-time simulation displays the CO2 emissions of every country in the world, as well as their birth and death rates.
Although the CO2 emission, birth rate and death rate data used in Breathing Earth comes from reputable sources, data that measures things on such a massive scale can never be 100% accurate. Please note however that the CO2 emission levels shown here are much more likely to be too low than they are to be too high...


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Global CO2 emissions

Animated time-lapse video of anthropogenic carbon dioxide emissions in map form, spanning the 18th century until this current first decade of the 21st centur...

 

This is not a complete data set, but the video still shows the striking connection between CO2 emissions and  the historical geography of industrialization.


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Seth Dixon's comment, August 2, 2012 2:21 PM
I'd love to take credit for this, but I didn't create this video, but am simply sharing a resource that I found online with the broader community. Follow the YouTube link to see info about the creator there (Cuagau1).
Mark V's comment, September 4, 2012 11:41 AM
Frightening and guilt inducing. The US and Europe the biggest historical violators, plus living in the northeastern part of the country which shows the highest concentrations.
Rafael CAYUELA's curator insight, February 3, 3:18 PM

Interesting and well done..

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Scorecard for the Sea: The Ocean Health Index

Scorecard for the Sea: The Ocean Health Index | Globalisation and interdependence | Scoop.it
To feed, employ, and sustain the world, our oceans must first be in good health. It is becoming increasingly clear that humans have a substantial impact on these marine ecosystems, and that these impacts are not just threatening the high-seas, but also the humans that depend on them for their livelihoods and well-being.

The health of our oceans is, therefore, primarily a human concern. But how do we measure the health of something as vast and bewildering as an entire ocean?

For many years, scientists have struggled to find a way to make the concept of ocean health meaningful and measureable. There have been a few breakthroughs but no real solution to allow us to concretely measure if things are getting better or worse and by how much? That is, until now.

Published in last week’s issue of the journal Nature The Ocean Health Index is a groundbreaking tool that allows us to take a look at how we as humans benefit from the big blue. The Index examines social, economic, and ecological factors, scaling both globally and locally to give us an accurate assessment. It finally gives us the baseline we need to measure progress...


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Food, Nutrition and Geography

Peter Menzel's beautiful photography and our Hungry Planet...

 

This video is a fascinating portal into global food systems and how globalization is impacting local foods.  He traveled around the world to see what families eat in a given week, and how much all the food cost and where it can from.  Many wealthy countries exhibit poor nutritional habits (eating food high in fat, sugar and salt) while some in poorer people have a very balanced diet.  This leads him to describe the 'Nutritional Transition.'  Warning before showing in class: there are brief instances of non-sexualized nudity in the video. 


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Globalization, Corporations and Franchises

Globalization, Corporations and Franchises | Globalisation and interdependence | Scoop.it

McDonald's and Starbucks can be seen as emblematic of the forces of globalization and the 'victors' of process as forcefully displayed in this graphic.  The local distinctive menu (not to mention the chef with a flair) typically loses out to the replicable, standardized and the familiar.  How come?  When is this not the case?  How does this change economics or culture? As a counter-point to globalization benefiting the chains, see how 'Yelp!' is reducing chains market share at: http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/ezra-klein/post/how-yelp-is-killing-chain-restaurants/2011/10/03/gIQAokJvHL_blog.html


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Elle Reagan's curator insight, September 29, 10:47 PM

This map is really interesting to me because it depicts how one franchise such as Starbucks or McDonald's can affect so many countries. It's globalization at its finest.

Emily Bian's curator insight, September 30, 11:50 PM

This is a good example of globalization. In India, McDonalds had to adapt because they didn't eat beef, so they made the burger patties out of other ingredients. Globalization is good and bad, it is good because it increases interactions between places, but may make places lose their unique cultural trait. Companies like starbucks and mcdonalds is now everywhere, and it is basically all the same, which isn't culturally unique. It can also make local small businesses lose their business.  

This map is also just really cool to look at, and it gave me a better idea of the impact of major chain companies. 

Michael Mazo's curator insight, December 13, 1:06 PM

In regards to area I live in, I always knew Mcdonalds was a staple for fast food and presumed it had been the same way across the globe. But Starbucks isn't as prevalent in my region as it is across the entire nation and even the globe. Without knowing the size of starbucks I really underestimated its potential. What makes sense to me is the fact that these companies are so large on an global economic scale, and the reason for this is because they took a risk and expanded overseas. In results their business boomed and hundreds of billions of dollars were made in the process. America stands as a staple for the perception of modern society and when foreigners see our businesses they instantly want in. So they big name franchises brought america to them and in result created economic success.