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An Antarctica Floe Chart Worthy Of Your Icy Stares | Fast Company

An Antarctica Floe Chart Worthy Of Your Icy Stares | Fast Company | Globalisation and interdependence | Scoop.it

Using new satellite data, scientists have plotted exactly how the ice moves around the South Pole, shining new light on exactly how much water is going to flood into the ocean as the ice melts.


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The Secret to a Sound Ocean

The Secret to a Sound Ocean | Globalisation and interdependence | Scoop.it
Acoustics mean different things to different species.

As humans, we need sound to hear our favorite music, the roar of the crowd and sirens so we don’t get flattened by a firetruck or freight train. While hearing is an enjoyable part of living a fulfilled life, we can get by without it.

Whales on the other hand, have a harder time. Whales are auditory creatures, meaning hearing is essential to their communication, navigation, feeding, and breeding.

Whales depend on sound in every aspect of their lives: from using echolocation to orient themselves in the dark waters, to emitting mating calls during breeding season, or just having a whale chat.

When container ships, oil tankers, and other large vessels travel through waters that are populated by whales, the ships produce noise that throws the whales into a state of disarray and messes with their activities and daily life. The sound is so strong, it would be as if you were at a party and someone blasted music so loud you couldn’t even hear each other speak — let alone try and mate. Sound is important to the whales, and creating a beautiful sounding ocean will help them in all their future endeavors...


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Scorecard for the Sea: The Ocean Health Index

Scorecard for the Sea: The Ocean Health Index | Globalisation and interdependence | Scoop.it
To feed, employ, and sustain the world, our oceans must first be in good health. It is becoming increasingly clear that humans have a substantial impact on these marine ecosystems, and that these impacts are not just threatening the high-seas, but also the humans that depend on them for their livelihoods and well-being.

The health of our oceans is, therefore, primarily a human concern. But how do we measure the health of something as vast and bewildering as an entire ocean?

For many years, scientists have struggled to find a way to make the concept of ocean health meaningful and measureable. There have been a few breakthroughs but no real solution to allow us to concretely measure if things are getting better or worse and by how much? That is, until now.

Published in last week’s issue of the journal Nature The Ocean Health Index is a groundbreaking tool that allows us to take a look at how we as humans benefit from the big blue. The Index examines social, economic, and ecological factors, scaling both globally and locally to give us an accurate assessment. It finally gives us the baseline we need to measure progress...


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When Sea Levels Attack

When Sea Levels Attack | Globalisation and interdependence | Scoop.it

Changes in global sea level due to rising temperatures...


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Ocean Health Study Raises Concerns, Offers Some Hope

Ocean Health Study Raises Concerns, Offers Some Hope | Globalisation and interdependence | Scoop.it

A comprehensive study of global oceanic health gave the world’s oceans a score of 60 out of 100.

The Ocean Health Index, produced by an international team of scientists, policymakers, and conservationists, assessed the vitality of 171 coastal countries and territorial regions in ten categories, including ecological characteristics such as “Coastal Protection,” “Biodiversity,” and sustainable seafood harvests, and economic qualities like “Coastal Livelihoods and Economies” and “Tourism and Recreation.”

The study is “the first comprehensive global measurement of ocean health that includes people as part of the ocean ecosystem,” and is designed to help strengthen national and regional efforts to preserve our coastal environments and evaluate marine health...


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Arctic sea ice before and after record low – interactive map

Arctic sea ice before and after record low – interactive map | Globalisation and interdependence | Scoop.it

Arctic sea ice has reached its lowest ever recorded extent, in 'dramatic changes', which signal that man-made global warming is having a major impact on the polar region.

Drag the slider across the map to see how the ice has shrunk between 1979 and 2012 in the interactive map at the article link.


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