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Globalisation and interdependence
Looking at the global interaction and interdependence
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Infographic: Which Countries Are Most Reliant on Libya for Oil?

Infographic: Which Countries Are Most Reliant on Libya for Oil? | Globalisation and interdependence | Scoop.it

Here's a breakdown of which nations depend most on the turbulent but oil-rich nation.


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How Does American Energy Consumption Measure Up in a Global Context?

How Does American Energy Consumption Measure Up in a Global Context? | Globalisation and interdependence | Scoop.it

Although the U.S. only comprises 5% of the the world’s population, we consume 20% of the world’s energy. Does this make you, as an American citizen, 20 times worse than the average Indian, 4 times worse than the average Brazilian and twice as bad as the average German? Or does it mean you live, work and play that much harder? Take a look and see what you see...


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How Much CO2 Is Created By… | GE Data Visualization

Charging you cellphone or preparing a cup of tea: play around with this visualization to find out how much carbon is released by various activities!


Via J. Campbell, Lauren Moss
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America and the West’s dirty little secret

America and the West’s dirty little secret | Globalisation and interdependence | Scoop.it
By importing goods from polluting factories in Asia, Americans and others in developed countries underwrite carbon emissions...

 

This is a compelling question: are reductions in greenhouse gases best measured by production or consumption?  The question that this article is posing is essentially trying to find blame for greenhouse gas emmision, but thinking geographically, ponders where along the commodity chain should the bulk of the blame be placed.  What do you think?  


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Asia is the world's largest petroleum consumer

Asia is the world's largest petroleum consumer | Globalisation and interdependence | Scoop.it
Energy Information Administration - EIA - Official Energy Statistics from the U.S.

 

This goes nicely with the carbon footprint data that was recently posted.  Although that was data aggregated at the national level and this is on the 'world realms' level, many of the same patterns are visible without the same specificity. 


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Global CO2 emissions

Animated time-lapse video of anthropogenic carbon dioxide emissions in map form, spanning the 18th century until this current first decade of the 21st centur...

 

This is not a complete data set, but the video still shows the striking connection between CO2 emissions and  the historical geography of industrialization.


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Seth Dixon's comment, August 2, 2012 2:21 PM
I'd love to take credit for this, but I didn't create this video, but am simply sharing a resource that I found online with the broader community. Follow the YouTube link to see info about the creator there (Cuagau1).
Mark V's comment, September 4, 2012 11:41 AM
Frightening and guilt inducing. The US and Europe the biggest historical violators, plus living in the northeastern part of the country which shows the highest concentrations.
Rafael CAYUELA's curator insight, February 3, 2014 3:18 PM

Interesting and well done..

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Power Consumption Facts in the U.S.

Power Consumption Facts in the U.S. | Globalisation and interdependence | Scoop.it
Infographic on power consumption facts in the U.S.

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Intro to Energy: A Global Picture

Intro to Energy: A Global Picture | Globalisation and interdependence | Scoop.it
A global picture of energy supply, demand, and trends.

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Energy Needs

Energy Needs | Globalisation and interdependence | Scoop.it

"Welcome to Energy Realities, a visual guide to global energy needs, which shows how technology and intelligence are ensuring humanity continues to progress. The site combines maps, multimedia, and writing from three premier publishers and tells the story of energy use, production, sustainability on our planet. We invite you to explore and share this content to help increase understanding and dialogue about our world's energy needs."

 

Energy usage projects to be one of the great geograpical problems of our time.  As ideas such as sustainable economic growth enter the public consciousness, changes to the status quo seem as the more inevitable for the future.  That will the future of consumption look like?  What should it look like?


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Global CO2 emissions

Animated time-lapse video of anthropogenic carbon dioxide emissions in map form, spanning the 18th century until this current first decade of the 21st centur...

 

This is not a complete data set, but the video still shows the striking connection between CO2 emissions and  the historical geography of industrialization.


Via Seth Dixon, Lauren Moss
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Seth Dixon's comment, August 2, 2012 2:21 PM
I'd love to take credit for this, but I didn't create this video, but am simply sharing a resource that I found online with the broader community. Follow the YouTube link to see info about the creator there (Cuagau1).
Mark V's comment, September 4, 2012 11:41 AM
Frightening and guilt inducing. The US and Europe the biggest historical violators, plus living in the northeastern part of the country which shows the highest concentrations.
Rafael CAYUELA's curator insight, February 3, 2014 3:18 PM

Interesting and well done..

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Visualizing the Global Carbon Footprint

Visualizing the Global Carbon Footprint | Globalisation and interdependence | Scoop.it

One of the key things I reinforce in conversations about globalization is that the advantages are unevenly distributed and the negative externalities to the system are also unevenly distributed.  This clever infographic highlights both rather effectively. 


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Dale Fraza's comment, February 27, 2012 3:26 PM
Really surprised at a couple things:
1. Brazil's relative tinyness in comparison with the U.S. Guess I've always just heard bad things about Brazil in regards to deforestation and the like.
2. Just how much a formerly agricultural nation (China) has exploded. Something really needs to be done about the environmental havoc they are wreaking (not to be a total ethnocentrist or anything).
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Extreme Weather and Drought Are Here to Stay

Extreme Weather and Drought Are Here to Stay | Globalisation and interdependence | Scoop.it
It is increasingly clear that we already live in the era of human-induced climate change, with unprecedented weather and climate extremes.

 

I don't delight in sharing the bad news.  So is this drought just a freak anomaly or a sign of a new normal?


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Seth Dixon's comment, August 13, 2012 2:28 PM
The graphic was not connected to the article. It was linked on a PBS facebook page and I linked the juxtaposition of the graphic and the NY Times article. Here is the FB page: https://www.facebook.com/EarthTheOperatorsManual.Page Personally, an entire century as a baseline of comparison does not feel like cherrypicking data. True the Earth is an incredibly complex system that controlling for all variables is in essence impossible, but denying that the system has changed seems foolish to me. Why has the system changed? I'm okay with that being a reasonable debate worthy of academics.