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Deserts ‘greening’ from rising CO2

Deserts ‘greening’ from rising CO2 | Global warming | Scoop.it
From CSIRO and “increased CO2 has benefits” department:  Increased levels of carbon dioxide (CO2) have helped boost green foliage across the world’s arid regions over the past 30 years through a process called CO2 fertilisation, according to CSIRO...

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Climate change heat intensifies Texas drought - the coast is cooler

Climate change heat intensifies Texas drought - the coast is cooler | Global warming | Scoop.it

Drought in the Lone Star State, where water has become such a Texas-size problem that some desperate residents do rain dances while others hope for tropical storms.


Via Michael Stuart
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Michael Stuart's curator insight, July 13, 2013 4:34 AM

While drought has several causes, climate scientists say global warming is a long-term contributor that could be exacerbating current conditions, especially in the already-arid Southwest. They say it will likely do more damage in the future.


Why? Higher temperatures cause more water to evaporate, and unless there's enough rain to offset it, the ground dries up.


More heat is on the way, too. U.S. temperatures are expected to rise 3 to 10 degrees by 2100, partly because of the heat-trapping greenhouse gases emitted in the burning of fossil fuels, according to a draft copy of the third National Climate Assessment, a federal report compiled by hundreds of government and academic scientists.


As a result, the report expects summer droughts to intensify in most U.S. regions as well as enduring water shortages in the Southwest, Southeast and Hawaii.


Drought, which struck as much as two-thirds of the land in the 48 contiguous states last year, still afflicts 44% of that area and 87% of Texas, reports the U.S. Drought Monitor.


The Texas coast is cooler and has an endless supply of water if and when desalination plants are installed. Sea level rises are being prepared for with seawalls and high elevations.

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Models point to rapid sea-level rise from climate change

Models point to rapid sea-level rise from climate change | Global warming | Scoop.it
Sea levels could rise by 2.3 metres for each degree celsius that global temperatures increase and they will remain high for centuries to come, according to a new study by the leading climate research institute.

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We're losing Malibu and Nantucket. This is why we can't wait to address climate change.

We're losing Malibu and Nantucket. This is why we can't wait to address climate change. | Global warming | Scoop.it
If you wait for a crisis to reach your doorstep, it'll be too late to act. The story of beach homes threatened by the encroaching sea is an example of why we need to act now to slow climate change.

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Sea Levels Increase Two Meters for Each Degree of Global Warming - Businessweek

Sea Levels Increase Two Meters for Each Degree of Global Warming - Businessweek | Global warming | Scoop.it
Sea Levels Increase Two Meters for Each Degree of Global Warming Businessweek Sea levels may rise by more than 2 meters (6.6 feet) for each degree Celsius of global warming the planet experiences over the next 2,000 years, according to a study by...
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Insect discovery sheds light on climate change - The Times of India

Insect discovery sheds light on climate change - The Times of India | Global warming | Scoop.it
The researchers have named the new family the Eorpidae, after the Eocene Epoch, the age when these insects lived some 50 million years ago.

Via Maria Nunzia @Varvera
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Energy Vulnerabilities to Climate Change and Extreme Weather

Energy Vulnerabilities to Climate Change and Extreme Weather | Global warming | Scoop.it

The nation’s entire energy system is vulnerable to increasingly severe and costly weather events driven by climate change, according to a report from the Department of Energy


Via Michael Stuart
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Michael Stuart's curator insight, July 11, 2013 10:41 AM

The report supports national climate change adaptation planning through the Interagency Climate Change Adaptation Task Force and Strategic Sustainability Planning process.


The Department of Energy’s goal of promoting energy security—examines current and potential future impacts of these climate trends on the U.S. energy sector.


CHAPTER 3: focuses on Increasing Storms, Flooding, and Sea Level Rise


Key messages:

• Increasing intensity of storm events, sea level rise, and storm surge put coastal and offshore oil and gas facilities at increased risk of
damage or disruption.
• Increasing intensity of stormevents increases the risk of damage to electric transmission and distribution lines.
• Increasing intensity of storm events, sea level rise, and storm surge poses a risk to coastal thermoelectric facilities, while increasing
intensity and frequency of flooding poses a risk to inland thermoelectric facilities.
• Increasing intensity and frequency of flooding increases the risk to rail and barge transport of crude oil, petroleum products, and coal.

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Climate Change and the Nature of Science: The Carbon “Tipping Point” is Coming |

Climate Change and the Nature of Science: The Carbon “Tipping Point” is Coming | | Global warming | Scoop.it

The two attached pictures are schematic diagrams of the circulation of carbon on Earth (IPAA Report (2001) – the Carbon Cycle).  If I Google “Carbon Cycle Diagram” in the image mode, I get close to a million entries.  Most of these entries look like the second image – not the first.  What is the difference?  The second one doesn’t have numbers (photoshopping on my part).

 

The numbers in the arrows of the first image represent fluxes of carbon per year in units of billion tons of carbon.  The numbers outside the arrows represent quantities in the same units of billion tons of carbon. The man-made (anthropogenic) contributions are shown by the dashed red arrows.

 

Scientifically, it is very difficult to argue with the second diagram.  I have to make qualitative statements like, “I don’t believe that carbon is exchanging between the atmosphere and the oceans.”  It is much easier to argue – scientifically – with the first diagram.  If I have the background and tools, I can either try to follow the original measurements or to take the measurements myself.  It doesn’t really matter if the job is too big; the fact that, in principle, I can do it, makes the first diagram science, while
the second figure is obviously a good qualitative description but is not actually science.

 

Click headline to read more and view both pix--

 


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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CO2 and the Ideology of Climate Change: The Forces Behind "Carbon-Centric Environmentalism"

CO2 and the Ideology of Climate Change: The Forces Behind "Carbon-Centric Environmentalism" | Global warming | Scoop.it

Ostensibly a not-for-profit enterprise, preaching the climate change creed has also become a lucrative endeavor, with immense financial resources provided for its continued proselytization. Indeed, the climate-related tax-exempt 501C3 organizations constitute a multi-billion dollar public relations machine devoted to driving home one central theme: humans are to blame for every weather-related disaster graphically presented in every electronic media outlet. Such phony environmentalism involves vigorous efforts to transform public policy based on dubious science while ignoring genuine environmental threats.


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Seas may rise 2.3 meters per degree of global warming: report - Reuters

Seas may rise 2.3 meters per degree of global warming: report - Reuters | Global warming | Scoop.it
Economic Times
Seas may rise 2.3 meters per degree of global warming: report
Reuters
Scientists say global warming is responsible for the melting ice. A U.N.
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