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Who Owns Your Meme? User-Generated Content Ownership on ...

Who Owns Your Meme? User-Generated Content Ownership on ... | Global-Ready Content | Scoop.it
There is a lot of confusion over whether user-generated content on social networks can be used for general use by anyone. This post breaks down the terms of service of major social networks to determine who really owns ...
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Translators Without Borders and Common Sense Advisory Team-Up for Africa

Translators Without Borders and Common Sense Advisory Team-Up for Africa | Global-Ready Content | Scoop.it
 
Yesterday, GALA posted a blog article about a new project that is being undertaken by Translators Without Borders (TWB) and the Common Sense Advisory (CSA).
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Confab 2012: Thoughts and Reactions

Confab 2012: Thoughts and Reactions | Global-Ready Content | Scoop.it
Question Mark:What is a Question Mark?Learn about the usage of Question mark through proper examples...
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Upcoming session of Getting Started as a Freelance Translator

Upcoming session of Getting Started as a Freelance Translator | Global-Ready Content | Scoop.it
The next session of my online course “Getting Started as a Freelance Translator” starts on Wednesday, January 25. This is a four-week “quick start” session for any new translators who want to get a jump on their business goals for 2012.
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Content is king? What does that mean for me?

In this article Jennifer Beaupre Glynn outlines 4 things that you can do to make your content "king." They are: 

 

Make your content easy to understand.

Put some effort into it.

Be proactive.

Market your content.

 

I definitely agree that making sure your content is easy to understand is a critical aspect of great content. Putting effort, forethought, and research into your content is also very important. Being proactive will get your content out there - but I'm not so sure it will be "king" if you haven't done steps one and two. If you marketing (step four) crummy content proactively (step four), I think you can do more harm than good.

 

I would suggest sticking to steps one and two first. Then, when you are satisfied, move on to steps three and four.  If you do these steps in the reverse order, you will not be king, you will be th court jester.

 

****

 

In 1996 Bill Gates published an article called,  "Content is King".  He said, "Content is where I expect much of the real money will be made on the Internet".  It is now 15 years later and the amount of content on the Internet is enormous.

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New Research Study to Explore Connection between Translation and

New Research Study to Explore Connection between Translation and | Global-Ready Content | Scoop.it

This is a very important article that I blogged about fully at www.contentrules.com/blog. ;

 

New Research Study to Explore Connection between Translation and Information Disparities in Africa. GALA is a fully representative, non-profit, international industry association for the translation, internationalization, ...

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Christmas customs

Christmas customs | Global-Ready Content | Scoop.it
In the UK, our bringer of Christmas presents spends the night of December 24th coming down chimneys and leaving presents for children to find on the morning of Christmas Day. We call him Father Christmas, though he’s also known as Santa Claus.
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New blog for interpreters

New blog for interpreters | Global-Ready Content | Scoop.it
I’ve often harped on the topic of unfilled blogging niches, and specifically on the lack of blogs for/by interpreters and for/by translation buyers and clients.
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Must-See Content Marketing Examples From 2011

Must-See Content Marketing Examples From 2011 | Global-Ready Content | Scoop.it
Looking for some great examples of content marketing? Well, look no further. Here, 20 of our bloggers share their favorite examples from 2011. What have you seen that you you love? Let us know in the comments!
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Pandaplomacy! Eats shoots and helps ease global tension - The Independent

Pandaplomacy! Eats shoots and helps ease global tension - The Independent | Global-Ready Content | Scoop.it
Pandaplomacy! Eats shoots and helps ease global tensionThe IndependentAny identity crisis they are likely to suffer will not be made easier by the decision to translate their names to the English, Sweetie and Sunshine.
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Chitter Chatter in the Translation Industry

Chitter Chatter in the Translation Industry | Global-Ready Content | Scoop.it
With the upcoming launch of the United Kingdom and France data sets, I can't help but be excited to compare the internet space in France, England, and the United States. The internet is absolutely global, as anyone at ...

 

This article is by Elliot Telford, who is heading up customer support for the international campaign of compete.com. Compete.com is a website that helps companies analyze the online behavior of their customers. Though he is from France, I don't think that Elliot is a translator in the usual sense of the word. However, he offers up his opinions, plus some statistics, about the translation industry. The bottom line for Elliot is that the translation world is growing and will continue to grow. 

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Do You Know the Difference Between Pre-Editing and Post-Editing?

Do You Know the Difference Between Pre-Editing and Post-Editing? | Global-Ready Content | Scoop.it
Via Scoop.it – Global-Ready Content

In this post on the Trusted Translations blog, the writer (Julia S.) describes the difference between pre-editing and post-editing content as part of the translation process.
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A (very) unscientific TechComm trend survey | The RoboColum(n)

A (very) unscientific TechComm trend survey | The RoboColum(n) | Global-Ready Content | Scoop.it
In the last week I've had two conversations about trends in the UK technical communication industry. ... If representative, the picture painted above is reassuring if you are young and wanting a career in Technical Writing.

 

Maybe things are very different in the U.K. I really don't relate to much of this post, but it is an interesting perspective on things in the tech comm world across the pond.

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Do You Know the Difference Between Pre-editing and Post-editing?

Do You Know the Difference Between Pre-editing and Post-editing? | Global-Ready Content | Scoop.it

In this post on the Trusted Translations blog, the writer (Julia S.) describes the difference between pre-editing and post-editing. Her definition of pre-editing is as follows:

 

"As the name suggests, pre-editing is the process of adjusting text before it is automatically translated in order to improve the raw quality of the machine translation output and to reduce the amount of work required in the post-editing process."

 

I would add that pre-editing is the process of adjusting text before it is translated. Period. It could be translated by machine. It could be translated by a person. It doesn't matter. To get the very best results out of *any* translation, pre-editing - or global readiness editing as I like to call it - is a really good idea.

 

The author goes on to say this about pre-editing:

 

"One such task is that in which the source text is written with fixed rules such as using short sentences, avoiding complex or ambiguous syntactic structures, term consistency etc. Other pre-editing tasks can involve spell checking the source text, format checking, and tagging elements in the source document that are not to be translated."

 

All of these tasks are part of global readiness. But, there is so much more to it than this. To do a thorough global readiness edit, I always recommend that we analyze the content first and, using our state-of-the-art tools, give it a global readiness score. That way, we can see the results of the edit. We also use our tools to go through the content, sentence by sentence, to flag issues that will be problematic in translation. One of the benefits of doing a global readiness edit is that the source content is much more readable in English, too. 

 

Finally, the author says this:

 

"There will always be a trade-off between time and money spent on pre-editing and post-editing. What is important for the client to keep in mind is that if a document is going to be translated into many different target languages, it probably makes more sense to spend more time in the pre-editing phase."

 

In my experience, any money spent on pre-editing is made up for in spades on the translation side. Almost 100% of the time, customers who spend money pre-editing save so much more money on translation, that they don't even notice the pre-editing cost. Yes, pre-editing takes time. But, so does in-country iteration. A good, thorough pre-edit will save many review cycles in many languages after the content is translated.

 

Read the post here.

 

**

 

Some of you may have heard of a new translation field called post-editing.

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Ten Commonly-Misused Expressions From British English

Ten Commonly-Misused Expressions From British English | Global-Ready Content | Scoop.it
Mustard, unpassed. Language is a liquid constant. Its only job is to communicate and, really, so long as it does this reasonably efficaciously, none of
Val Swisher's insight:

This is a great compilation of bufoos that we make in everyday idiomatic language.

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Longer life expectancy discount

Longer life expectancy discount | Global-Ready Content | Scoop.it
Mox is a young but well educated translator. Two PhDs, six languages... and he hardly earns the minimum wage.

Via Catherine Christaki
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Val Swisher's comment, January 15, 2012 3:40 PM
Hillarious. :-)
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Here is a Little Christmas Glossary!

Here is a Little Christmas Glossary! | Global-Ready Content | Scoop.it
 
If you are not a native English speaker and if you want to improve your English, you may make some friends who are native. You discuss everyday issues with them and you clearly see how English is used in daily life.
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On globalizing your contact information but still managing to confuse somebody

On globalizing your contact information but still managing to confuse somebody | Global-Ready Content | Scoop.it

Erin Vang is one of my favorite people in the localization world. I love attending events where she is the emcee. She is fabulous. In this interesting post, Erin discusses some faux pas in the international naming space. She describes a funny breakdown in communication between herself and another native English speaker. You should read the post - I'm definitely not as funny as Erin!

 

***

My friend Ruth M Sylte has been doing a great series on how to internationalize your email signature and other contact information basics, and it reminded me of a funny communication breakdown that I once caused.

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Joining Sally Field’s “like me” revolution

Joining Sally Field’s “like me” revolution | Global-Ready Content | Scoop.it
In 1985, a few eyebrows were raised (and many eyes rolled) when Sally Field gave her “You like me!” Academy Award acceptance speech.
That speech has always been like fingernails on a chalkboard to me (and a lot of other people, too).

 

In this article, Alan Pringle from Scriptorium discusses the profligation of the term "like" all over the internet. Every where we turn, we see "like" buttons. We can +1 or click "like" to show our pleasure at something.

 

How does this relate to the field of techical writing? Alan describes a real-time voice translation company, Babelverse, that uses a rating system for its translators. When a customer finishes a conversation, that customer needs to rate the translator. Then, the ratings stay with the translator and the next customer can pick based on rating. Think of it like Yelp for translators.

 

I think this is an interesting idea and I gave it a bit of thought. At Content Rules, I have seen situations where the consultant creates amazing content, but does not get along well with the customer. Brusque consultants doing stellar work doth not necessarily make the customer happy.

 

On the flip side, I have had occasions where the consultant really wasn’t delivering the best goods, but got along famously with the customer. And the customer was happy – even though I wanted to switch out the consultant. “Quality work” was part experiential and part the work itself.

 

Perhaps the difference is rating the quality of the content versus rating the experience of working with the person who wrote/translated it. Those two things are not necessarily the same. So if we ask for ratings, we need to be very specific. It’s not that we can’t ask for both – we should – but we need to make sure we keep those things separate.

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Gilbane Boston Recap

Gilbane Boston Recap | Global-Ready Content | Scoop.it
I spent this past week at the Gilbane Conference in Boston, MA. This was my first time attending Gilbane. The organization and the conference have a solid reputation for bringing key industry leaders together, and I was anxious to check it out.
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What if You Sold Waffles With a Side of Content?

What if You Sold Waffles With a Side of Content? | Global-Ready Content | Scoop.it
On a recent trip to Pittsburgh, PA., one of our clients introduced us to two intriguing retail experiments on using content creation to drive business at retail locations: The Waffle Shop and the Conflict Kitchen.
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ReadWriteWeb Events Guide, December 3, 2011

ReadWriteWeb Events Guide, December 3, 2011 | Global-Ready Content | Scoop.it
We're always on the lookout for upcoming Web tech events from around world. Know of something taking place that should appear here? Want to get your event included in the calendar? Let us know in the comments below or email us.
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Ebook Self-Publishing Alternatives: Amazon Kindle, Moodle, Tizra

Ugur Akinci is one of my favorite bloggers. He is the owner of the Technical Communication Center and an experienced writer. Ugur's posts are usually insightful and well-balanced. 

 

In this post, Ugur discusses three publishing platforms for eBooks: Kindle, Moodle, and a new one called Tizra. Kindle has the great advantage of being Amazon-based. This means that as long as you pay attention to your titles and keywords, your SEO is pretty much taken care of by the oodles of traffic hitting Amazon every day. Unfortunately, Kindle does not allow you to publish .pdf files, but Ugur shows you a work-around using a "Save as" feature in MS Word.

 

Moodle has reader interaction, which is missing from both Kindle and Tizra. Moodle is an open-source platform, which means the price is right. It is used quite a bit by universities around the world.

 

The new entry in the market is Tizra. Tizra's claim to fame is that it can publish .pdf files. Unfortunately, it lacks interactivity (like Kindle), and since it doesn't have the same traffic advantages as Kindle, targeted search can be an issue.

 

To read Ugur's full post, which has many more details, click here.

 

© Ugur Akinci Every week I hear about yet another “platform” to self-publish content online. Today I had the chance to have a look at Tizra.com and wanted to compare it to Kindle and Moodle, two of my favorite publishing platforms.

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Finding the right TMS - how hard can it be?

Finding the right TMS - how hard can it be? | Global-Ready Content | Scoop.it
Berlin-based LSP, text & form, was faced with exactly this dilemma. The costs associated with maintaining and extending their proprietary TMS solution were substantial, yet the list of desired functionalities continued to grow.

 

In this post, Bob Donaldson, Founder and Principal at Carson Strategy Group, takes a deep dive into all of the things you need to consider when you are evaluating TMS solutions. This is a long and detailed article, but really covers all of the important topics.

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High-speed tech jargon

High-speed tech jargon | Global-Ready Content | Scoop.it
In its most familiar sense, jargon means specialised, often technical vocabulary associated with a particular type of work or area of activity.
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Technical Documentation: Getting Good ... - Writing Assistance, Inc.

Technical Documentation: Getting Good ... - Writing Assistance, Inc. | Global-Ready Content | Scoop.it
She has been a member of Society of Technical Communicators for over 10 years and has a degree in Technical Communications. She currently produces manuals and online help for enterprise-level software, SAAS, and ...

 

This is a great post by Luanne Oleas. In it, she discusses many (all?) of the problems faced today by technical writers. I agree largely with everything Luanne has to say here. The only thing I might add is that the nature of the job of technical writer is changing dramatically.

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