Global Perspective Education
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schools | Big Picture Education Australia

starting new schools, supporting school change and influencing the education conversation...

Via Global Education Project, Victoria
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Granted, but... - New blog by Grant Wiggins (co designer of Ubd)

Granted, but... - New blog by Grant Wiggins (co designer of Ubd) | Global Perspective Education | Scoop.it
thoughts on education by Grant Wiggins...
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Teaching for Understanding

Teaching for Understanding | Global Perspective Education | Scoop.it

The Teaching for Understanding project was a five-year research program designed to develop and test a pedagogy of understanding. The project targeted the middle and high school years and focused on teaching
and learning in four subjects (English, history, math, and science) and interdisciplinary studies. Since the project's inception, researchers and practitioners have collaborated to develop, refine, and test the pedagogy.

 


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Purposeful Games for Social Change

Purposeful Games for Social Change | Global Perspective Education | Scoop.it
"Purposeful Games for Social Change" is a list of serious games designed to foster social change/justice or to raise awareness.
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Understanding by Design - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Understanding by Design - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia | Global Perspective Education | Scoop.it

 

Understanding by Design, or UbD, is a tool utilized for educational planning focused on "teaching for understanding".[1] The emphasis of UbD is on "backward design", the practice of looking at the outcomes in order to design curriculum units, performance assessments, and classroom instruction.[2] The UbD framework was designed by nationally recognized educators Grant Wigginsand Jay McTighe, and published by the Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.[3] Understanding by Design® is a registered trademark of the Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development ("ASCD") and UbD is a trademark owned by ASCD.

According to Wiggins, "The potential of UbD for curricular improvement has struck a chord in American education. Over 250,000 educators own the book. Over 30,000 Handbooks are in use. More than 150 University education classes use the book as a text."[

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ALPS: Teaching for Understanding: What's the TfU Framework?

The Teaching for Understanding framework, developed in a research project at Project Zero during the early nineties, links what David Perkins has called "four cornerstones of pedagogy" with four elements of planning and instruction.


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Mary Perfitt-Nelson's curator insight, May 4, 2014 11:38 AM

The Teaching for Understanding framework, developed in a research project at Project Zero during the early nineties, links what David Perkins has called "four cornerstones of pedagogy" with four elements of planning and instruction.

Rescooped by Robert Marat from Educational Technology News
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Higher Ed Disruptive Technology Ideas: Not So New

Higher Ed Disruptive Technology Ideas: Not So New | Global Perspective Education | Scoop.it

"For at least the past decade there has been much talk about the advantages of highly sophisticated online courses and the use of online tools in traditional courses. One of the significant advantages of technology-enhanced courses, it is said, is that they can be tailored to individual students’ needs, and thus achieve desired learning outcomes for each student better and faster... But using technology to individualize student learning is not at all a new idea — it does not originate with online courses or with the technology developments of the past decade, or two, or even three."


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