Global Management
Follow
Find
555 views | +0 today
 
Rescooped by Santanu Borah from Small Business Advisor
onto Global Management
Scoop.it!

Selling to The Bottom of the Pyramid

Selling to The Bottom of the Pyramid | Global Management | Scoop.it
The bottom of the pyramid concept is the theory that even the poorest markets in the world can be revenue generating for companies if they tailor their.
Via paulgreen
more...
No comment yet.
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Santanu Borah
Scoop.it!

For IBM, Africa Is Risky and Rife With Opportunity

For IBM, Africa Is Risky and Rife With Opportunity | Global Management | Scoop.it
Big Blue thinks its software and data expertise will sell in the region
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Santanu Borah
Scoop.it!

How Ikea took over the world

How Ikea took over the world | Global Management | Scoop.it
In a stunning global expansion, the Swedish home furnishings giant has been quietly planting its blue and yellow flag in places you’d never expect. Pay attention, Wal-Mart: You could learn a few things.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Santanu Borah
Scoop.it!

Goodyear Agrees to Settle Bribery Case

Goodyear Agrees to Settle Bribery Case | Global Management | Scoop.it
Without admitting wrongdoing, the tire maker will pay $16 million to settle charges that its Kenya and Angola subsidiaries violated federal antibribery laws.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Santanu Borah
Scoop.it!

‘Always Carry TP’: 5 Tips for Expats & Others Touring China

‘Always Carry TP’: 5 Tips for Expats & Others Touring China | Global Management | Scoop.it
We asked a couple of colleagues in China for a handful of practical tips for expats new in China and eager to tour the country.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Santanu Borah
Scoop.it!

Russia widens McDonald's food probe

Russia widens McDonald's food probe | Global Management | Scoop.it
Russia's main consumer watchdog announces unscheduled checks on a number of McDonald's restaurants as part of an investigation into food standards.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Santanu Borah
Scoop.it!

What's Behind the Rise of Xiaomi

What's Behind the Rise of Xiaomi | Global Management | Scoop.it
Dec. 30 -- On “Before The Bell,” Holland & Co. Chairman Michael Holland and Bloomberg’s Betty Liu, Brendan Greeley and Erik Schatzker report on today’s top trending news stories. They speak on “In The Loop.”
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Santanu Borah
Scoop.it!

How the world’s biggest companies bribe foreign governments—in 11 charts

How the world’s biggest companies bribe foreign governments—in 11 charts | Global Management | Scoop.it
Bribery knows no boundaries, or borders.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Santanu Borah
Scoop.it!

At Siemens, Bribery Was Just a Line Item - NYTimes.com

At Siemens, Bribery Was Just a Line Item - NYTimes.com | Global Management | Scoop.it
Corruption helped to build Siemens, but also cost it $1.6 billion, the largest fine for bribery in modern corporate history.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Santanu Borah
Scoop.it!

Lenovo, the Treasure Hunter of Tech

Lenovo, the Treasure Hunter of Tech | Global Management | Scoop.it
China's Lenovo has prospered by scavenging other companies' castoffs. Now it wants to compete in mobile
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Santanu Borah
Scoop.it!

Self-funded and deep-rooted: How ISIS makes its millions - CNN.com

Self-funded and deep-rooted: How ISIS makes its millions - CNN.com | Global Management | Scoop.it
As U.S.-led forces bomb ISIS targets, experts say it will take much more than air power to stop this deeply entrenched, well financed terrorist group.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Santanu Borah
Scoop.it!

What a Stronger Dollar Means for the Economy

What a Stronger Dollar Means for the Economy | Global Management | Scoop.it
The seemingly inexorable rise of the dollar versus the euro and most other currencies has broad implications this year and beyond.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Santanu Borah
Scoop.it!

Walmart's China Blues

Doing Business in China

Santanu Borah's insight:

Walmart's China Blues

December 22, 2014
By Steven Butler
There were plenty of customers crowding Walmart’s produce and meat departments on a recent Sunday morning at the gigantic Wangjing Beijing store. But throughout the rest of the two-story rabbit warren, stacked high with goods for sale, shoppers were sparse. Wang Chun Hang, a 32-year-old office worker, paced the floors with her husband, looking cold despite a thick winter jacket. She was there on a once-a-month shopping expedition to pick up a few things. “Few” is the key word here.

The store is a “little bit more expensive” than other local food stores, she says. The bulk of her spending goes to a Chinese rival retail chain called Beijing Chao Shi Fa. Fruits, veggies, meat and rice — she purchases them all at a Chao Shi Fa near home.

Business is getting tougher for foreign companies in fast-growing China, in sectors from retail to technology to consumer goods. Why? Chinese companies are increasingly competitive, the Chinese economy is slowing, rising nationalism is turning the Chinese suspicious of foreign rivals and an anti-corruption campaign is spilling over to affect foreigners. On top of it all is the erratic manner in which the Chinese government is enforcing laws.

Everyone’s worried, especially about competition with Chinese rivals.

It’s not just that “China’s getting more difficult for business,” says Daniel Wright, CEO of GreenPoint Group, which advises companies on doing business in China. Rather, Wright points out, the country is evening out once-foreign-friendly preferential treatments. In the 1980s, China started opening up and rolled out the welcome mat: tax breaks and other incentives to attract technology and capital. Now China’s just a more “normal” place to do business, Wright says. James McGregor, chairman of the business advisory firm APCO Worldwide for China, agrees. “For years, companies have been saying we wanted to be treated like Chinese companies,” he says. Apparently, the treatment isn’t so pleasant.

Just one example is the story of Walmart, the $466 billion company that operates more than 6,100 stores in 26 countries outside of the U.S. but is hitting headwinds in China. When Walmart arrived in China almost 20 years ago, it was blazing a retail trail. No longer: Chinese sales fell in the third quarter of the year by 0.8 percent, after rising by 1.1 percent in the previous quarter. (Sales totals are not disclosed.)

It’s not just Walmart — everyone’s worried, especially about competition with Chinese rivals. Not to mention a general sense of alienation in the air. Sixty percent of companies told the American Chamber of Commerce that they felt less welcome in China than in the past. On many people’s minds is Microsoft. Earlier this year, the government banned the use of Windows 8 on government computers, ostensibly over security concerns. Then over the summer, China’s antitrust regulator raided Microsoft offices over suspected violations of the 6-year-old anti-monopoly law. Finally, last month, authorities levied a $140 million fine on the giant software company over taxes it said Microsoft owed. (A Microsoft spokesperson declined to comment on the Chinese government’s actions.) Of course, Microsoft is no stranger to regulatory battles, but many foreign companies fear that China’s singling out the software giant because it’s foreign owned. Government officials deny the suggestion.


A visitor takes a look at the Microsoft booth during the first World Internet Conference in Wuzhen, Zhejiang province, China, on Nov. 20, 2014.
SOURCE Corbis
Let’s be clear: Business is still pretty good. A survey by the US-China Business Council found that 83 percent of member companies are operating profitably this year, though that’s down from 91 percent in 2013. Profit margins are the same or higher in China than elsewhere for 69 percent of companies. Sure, only half of all foreign companies currently posting up in China are planning to increase resources to China. But hardly anyone’s pulling back.

A stricter law enforcement environment spread to foreign companies following the rise to power of Chinese President Xi Jinping two years ago, when he launched an anti-corruption campaign that’s caught tens of thousands of officials in government- and state-owned industries on the receiving end of bribes, including the arrest last month of the once-powerful security chief Zhou Yongkang. Chinese citizens like the campaign; high officials and their relatives have grown fat as the economy has sped ahead. (“It’s probably saving a lot of people’s livers,” jokes a business consultant, referring to the decline of heavy drinking at corporate banquets with government officials.) On the other hand, McGregor says, while reforms are forcing foreign companies to toe the line, they’re also opening up new sectors for business — for example, health care and clean energy.

Maybe, as Wright argues, China’s private sector is just becoming more, well, Chinese. For a country with the second-largest economy in the world, a completely expat-led model makes little sense; outsiders, at least, need to integrate better, with leaders comfortable in the language and culture, he says. One example of a foreign success story? Wright cites GE, which last summer appointed 43-year-old Shanghai native Rachel Duan as China CEO of GE’s $7 billion business. (Wright does not work with GE.) In the meantime, businesses from multinational corporations to tech companies to retailers alike are sure to become more frenetic in their searches for the right sort of leaders. But as ever, when the winds change, a few people benefit. Like who? Wright knows at least one example: “Headhunter firms in China are very busy.”

Ben Halder contributed reporting.

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Santanu Borah
Scoop.it!

Banks to Pay $5.6 Billion in Probes

Banks to Pay $5.6 Billion in Probes | Global Management | Scoop.it
The five big banks will plead guilty to criminal charges to resolve a U.S. investigation into whether traders colluded to move foreign-currency rates for their own benefit.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Santanu Borah
Scoop.it!

Brazil Bribery Inquiry Targets Top Politicians

Brazil Bribery Inquiry Targets Top Politicians | Global Management | Scoop.it
The leaders of both houses of Congress are among those to be investigated, by order of the Supreme Federal Tribunal, the nation’s highest court.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Santanu Borah
Scoop.it!

10 big international exits by retailers

10 big international exits by retailers | Global Management | Scoop.it
Target's Canada exit is the latest example of retailers beating a retreat. Here are 10 more companies who said sayonara, auf wiedersehen and adios to international markets.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Santanu Borah
Scoop.it!

In Luanda, the Rich Feast, the Poor Scramble

In Luanda, the Rich Feast, the Poor Scramble | Global Management | Scoop.it
The Angolan metropolis is the world’s most expensive for expats
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Santanu Borah
Scoop.it!

Yum! to Bring First KFC to Myanmar in 2015

Yum! to Bring First KFC to Myanmar in 2015 | Global Management | Scoop.it
Oct. 13 (Bloomberg) -- Bloomberg's Haslinda Amin reports on Yum! Brands' plan to open the first KFC restaurant in Myanmar in 2015. She speaks with Bloomberg's Rishaad Salamat on "On The Move Asia." (Source: Bloomberg)
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Santanu Borah
Scoop.it!

Where U.S.-Cuba relations stand and what may change

Where U.S.-Cuba relations stand and what may change | Global Management | Scoop.it
President Obama announced sweeping changes to U.S. policy with Cuba on Wednesday, moving to normalize relations with the island nation.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Santanu Borah
Scoop.it!

Inside a Chinese Test-Prep Factory

Inside a Chinese Test-Prep Factory | Global Management | Scoop.it
Thousands of students travel to Maotanchang to spend 16 hours a day, seven days a week, studying for the biggest test of their lives.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Santanu Borah
Scoop.it!

Not just Wal-Mart: Dozens of U.S. companies face bribery suspicions

Not just Wal-Mart: Dozens of U.S. companies face bribery suspicions | Global Management | Scoop.it
Deere, Hewlett-Packard, Las Vegas Sands, Qualcom and many others are also under investigation for violations of the U.S. Foreign Corrupt Practices Act.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Santanu Borah
Scoop.it!

Inside the Chinese Boom in Corporate Espionage

Inside the Chinese Boom in Corporate Espionage | Global Management | Scoop.it
Chinese corporate espionage is "the greatest transfer of wealth in history," says the U.S. National Security Agency's director. And growing evidence says China's intelligence agencies are involved
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Santanu Borah
Scoop.it!

Anti-Immigration Rallies in Germany Defy Calls to Desist

Anti-Immigration Rallies in Germany Defy Calls to Desist | Global Management | Scoop.it
Despite the calls from Chancellor Angela Merkel appealing to Germans to avoid the marches and their organizers, demonstrators gathered against “economic refugees.”
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Santanu Borah
Scoop.it!

Adidos and Hotwind? In China, Brands Adopt Names to Project Foreign Flair

Adidos and Hotwind? In China, Brands Adopt Names to Project Foreign Flair | Global Management | Scoop.it
Chinese retailers, trying to appeal to shoppers who prefer goods made overseas, choose brand names that sound foreign, even if they don’t make sense in a foreign language.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Santanu Borah
Scoop.it!

African countries adopt hi-tech tourism

African countries adopt hi-tech tourism | Global Management | Scoop.it
Africa's tourism industry is booming thanks to resurgent national economies, rising visitor numbers and more effective use of technology.
more...
No comment yet.