Global Jargon
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Bizarre Borders


Via Seth Dixon
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Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, January 29, 2015 6:31 PM

Craziest thing I've ever seen!  The poor kids on Robert's Island that has to cross through Canada to go to school.  I think it's crazy that the borders were defined when they didn't even have a complete map.  Taking a guess obviously didn't work out.  It seems very difficult to define a border.  

WILBERT DE JESUS's curator insight, February 12, 2015 6:39 PM

Sometimes borders between frendly neighbours like Canada and USA are less protected than borders between countries with conflicts.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 4, 2015 10:01 PM
before watching this video, to be very honest, I thought we really did have the longest straightest possible border between two countries. What really blows my mind is that there is literally a gap between the two countries signifying the border. Another one is the random tip of land that goes into Canada, but it is not really land, it is a lake. But by far, the most bizarre border to me is the Point Roberts in Alaska, where the high school students have to actually pass international borders just to go to school.
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South Africa prays for Mandela's recovery - Aljazeera.com

South Africa prays for Mandela's recovery - Aljazeera.com | Global Jargon | Scoop.it
Aljazeera.com
South Africa prays for Mandela's recovery
Aljazeera.com
President office says 94-year-old anti-apartheid icon "responding positively" to treatment amid outpouring of support. Last Modified: 29 Mar 2013 10:43.
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Interactive Earth at Night

Interactive Earth at Night | Global Jargon | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
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Giovanni Della Peruta's curator insight, January 14, 2013 11:54 AM

Thanks to Nic Hardisty

Giovanni Della Peruta's comment, January 14, 2013 12:02 PM
Very good comment, Seth
سعيد محمد's comment, January 15, 2013 11:03 AM
ok
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Baby Boomers, Gen X, Gen Y: Who had the worst financial challenges? | Young Money | Personal Finance | Financial Post

Baby Boomers, Gen X, Gen Y: Who had the worst financial challenges? | Young Money | Personal Finance | Financial Post | Global Jargon | Scoop.it
Who had the worst financial challenges: Boomers, Generation X or Millennials?
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Ewarda O’Bara dies 42 years after slipping into coma | News | National Post

Ewarda O’Bara dies 42 years after slipping into coma | News | National Post | Global Jargon | Scoop.it
In 1970, Ewarda O'Bara was a student. She fell ill, threw up her medicine and fell into a coma.
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Mother’s fight to banish acorns from schoolyard goes too far: critics | Canada | News | National Post

Mother’s fight to banish acorns from schoolyard goes too far: critics | Canada | News | National Post | Global Jargon | Scoop.it
Donna Giustizia told her city council that the saplings dropping tree nuts onto school property pose a threat to young students with anaphylaxis-inducing allergies...
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Kim Jong-un’s hipster nephew Kim Han-sol labels North Korean leader a ‘dictator’ | World | News | National Post

Kim Jong-un’s hipster nephew Kim Han-sol labels North Korean leader a ‘dictator’ | World | News | National Post | Global Jargon | Scoop.it
Sporting thick framed glasses, two studs in his left ear and a trendy Western haircut, Kim Han-sol said he wished to "make things better" in his home country.
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Earth's Inconstant Magnetic Field And The Drift Of The Magnetic North Pole

Earth's Inconstant Magnetic Field And The Drift Of The Magnetic North Pole | Global Jargon | Scoop.it

Our planet's magnetic field is in a constant state of change, say researchers who are beginning to understand how it behaves and why.

 

Every few years, scientist Larry Newitt of the Geological Survey of Canada goes hunting. He grabs his gloves, parka, a fancy compass, hops on a plane and flies out over the Canadian arctic. Not much stirs among the scattered islands and sea ice, but Newitt's prey is there--always moving, shifting, elusive. His quarry is Earth's north magnetic pole. Scientists have long known that the magnetic pole moves. James Ross located the pole for the first time in 1831 after an exhausting arctic journey during which his ship got stuck in the ice for four years. No one returned until the next century. In 1904, Roald Amundsen found the pole again and discovered that it had moved--at least 50 km since the days of Ross.

 

The pole kept going during the 20th century, north at an average speed of 10 km per year, lately accelerating "to 40 km per year," says Newitt. At this rate it will exit North America and reach Siberia in a few decades. Keeping track of the north magnetic pole is Newitt's job. "We usually go out and check its location once every few years," he says. "We'll have to make more trips now that it is moving so quickly." Earth's magnetic field is changing in other ways, too: Compass needles in Africa, for instance, are drifting about 1 degree per decade. And globally the magnetic field has weakened 10% since the 19th century. When this was mentioned by researchers at a recent meeting of the American Geophysical Union, many newspapers carried the story. A typical headline: "Is Earth's magnetic field collapsing?" Probably not. As remarkable as these changes sound, "they're mild compared to what Earth's magnetic field has done in the past," says University of California professor Gary Glatzmaier.

 

Sometimes the the whole magnetic field of Earth completely flips. The north and the south poles swap places. Such reversals, recorded in the magnetism of ancient rocks, are unpredictable. They come at irregular intervals averaging about 300,000 years; the last one was 780,000 years ago. Are we overdue for another? No one knows.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald, ABroaderView, Sakis Koukouvis
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Robert T. Preston's curator insight, June 2, 2013 2:18 PM

The magnetic North Pole is ever on the move, and always has been.  See where it's been, where it's headed, and get a glimpse into why.

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BREAKING: Car Chase Suspect Commits Suicide On Live TV

BREAKING: Car Chase Suspect Commits Suicide On Live TV | Global Jargon | Scoop.it
A long car chase with a Dodge Caliber in Phoenix, Ariz., ended with the suspect shooting himself in the head on live TV, appearing to commit suicide.
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Gossip turn down the punk, for now | Music | Arts | National Post

Gossip turn down the punk, for now | Music | Arts | National Post | Global Jargon | Scoop.it
“We used a pop producer so it inevitably came out with more pop than our other records.”...
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Red Bull heir Vorayuth Yoovidhya pays $97,000 to family of man he is alleged to have killed with a $1M Ferrari | World | News | National Post

Red Bull heir Vorayuth Yoovidhya pays $97,000 to family of man he is alleged to have killed with a $1M Ferrari | World | News | National Post | Global Jargon | Scoop.it
'How could a sports car be more expensive than a man’s life?
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To avoid sex assault, don't dress "like a whore": Krista Ford

To avoid sex assault, don't dress "like a whore": Krista Ford | Global Jargon | Scoop.it
As Toronto Mayor Rob Ford's niece Krista advises women to avoid sexual assault - by not dressing like “whores” - a recent victim offers a personal response.

Via Obert Madondo
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The New World

The New World | Global Jargon | Scoop.it
An interactive series of maps show possible new additions to the world’s list of independent nations.

 

This is great way to show examples of devolution and political instability.  Included are 11 potential scenarios where further fragmentation/disintegration might occur or even greater regional integration that would redraw the map.  These case studies include: Somalia, Korea, Azerbaijan, Belgium and the Arabian Gulf Union.

 

Tags: political, devolution, supranationalism, war, autonomy, unit 4 political.


Via Seth Dixon
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Benjamin DeRita's comment, September 23, 2012 9:36 PM
Very interesting and informative piece, I found slide (10) especially intriguing with its discussion on the possibility of China claiming parts of Siberia.
Anna Sasaki's curator insight, March 24, 2015 8:53 AM

This article is probably one of my favorites I have read so far. It describes perfectly the political instability still present in the world, and that the globe and its boundaries are constantly changing, never staying put for too long. It surprised me at the new borders which most likely are going to happen, such as the unification of parts of Pakistan and Afghanistan. Also, the fact that South Korea is subtly getting ready for the reunification of North and South Korea. Also, there may be devolution in Mali and splintering devolution in the Congo's.

This shows devolution as the power in these nations in which are breaking up, such as Belgium and the Flemish peoples. It shows the centrifugal forces behind the breakup of nations, such as ethnicities which vary, or the centripetal forces which bring nations together such as the combination of South and North Korea. 

Caroline Ivy's curator insight, May 21, 2015 11:12 AM

Devolution/Fragmentation

 

This article is about nations that could become potentially independent in the near Future, whether due to chronic ethnic incoherence, redrawn governemnt policies, or a growing stateless nation group. Some examples given are an independent Khurdistan, a larger Azerbaijan, and the split of Belgium. 

 

Centrifugal forces are the root of conflict in many countries. These forces include ethnic variety, lack of common language, political instability. These are what may be causing a split in both Belgium (developed country) and Somalia (developing country). There may also be a unification of countries—the map gives an example of the Saudia Arabia, Oman, Yemen, Bahrain, and other melding into one Arabian Gulf Union, of China absorbing Siberia. This does not necessarily herald the presence of centripetal forces, as these countries may be the result of military conquest. 

 

 

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Top five regrets of the dying

Top five regrets of the dying | Global Jargon | Scoop.it
A palliative nurse has recorded the most common regrets of the dying. What would your biggest regret be if this was your last day of life?
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The inconvenient truth about fuel economy

The inconvenient truth about fuel economy | Global Jargon | Scoop.it
More than 300,000 visitors are expected to prowl the halls of the Metro Toronto Convention Centre over
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Former library CEO Barry Holmes named top squanderer of public dollars

Former library CEO Barry Holmes named top squanderer of public dollars | Global Jargon | Scoop.it
Congratulations, Barry Holmes, you've been nominated for an award -- for wasting taxpayer money. Maclean's magazine has declared the former CEO of the...
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‘Secret Santa’ storms through Sandy-battered New York handing $100 bills to strangers | Photos | National Post

‘Secret Santa’ storms through Sandy-battered New York handing $100 bills to strangers | Photos | National Post | Global Jargon | Scoop.it
A wealthy Missouri man posing as 'Secret Santa' stunned New Yorkers, handing $100 bills in Staten Island who had lost everything to Superstorm Sandy...
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Osama bin Laden’s burial detailed in internal military emails | World | News | National Post

Osama bin Laden’s burial detailed in internal military emails | World | News | National Post | Global Jargon | Scoop.it
The heavily blacked-out emails, which detail traditional Islamic death procedures, are the first public disclosure of government information about the al-Qaeda leader's demise...
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Justin Trudeau tiptoes cautiously into the realm of substance | Full Comment | National Post

Justin Trudeau tiptoes cautiously into the realm of substance | Full Comment | National Post | Global Jargon | Scoop.it
He’s against the route now proposed for the Northern Gateway pipeline, though not against pipelines per se; he’s against his father’s National Energy Program,opposes toughening Quebec’s language law, and supports the middle class.
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'Home Rule' plan to be unveiled

'Home Rule' plan to be unveiled | Global Jargon | Scoop.it
Scotland would raise around two thirds of all the money it spends, under proposals due to be unveiled by the Scottish Liberal Democrats.
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Most overrated jobs in 2012 | Business Insider | Financial Post

Most overrated jobs in 2012 | Business Insider | Financial Post | Global Jargon | Scoop.it
These sought-after positions aren't as fascinating as they initially appear — mainly because they share characteristics such as high levels of stress, long hours and tough job market competition...
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Why Canada should not have banned ‘bath salts’ | Full Comment | National Post

Why Canada should not have banned ‘bath salts’ | Full Comment | National Post | Global Jargon | Scoop.it
Are we any safer now that Canada has banned the designer drug du jour? Not likely. But organized criminals stand to get a lot richer.
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Yearbook, Sept. 23: Rheaume makes history

Yearbook, Sept. 23: Rheaume makes history | Global Jargon | Scoop.it

Sept. 23, 1992: Months after helping the Canadians win the gold medal at the IIHF women's world championship, goaltender Manon Rheaume found herself in a rather different forum: Expo Hall in Tampa, Fla., where she became the first woman to play in...


Via Jeremy Wilkins
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Ayn Rand: Still the most dangerous woman in America | FP Comment | Financial Post

Ayn Rand: Still the most dangerous woman in America | FP Comment | Financial Post | Global Jargon | Scoop.it
Judging by the barrage of attacks and references in the media, one can only conclude that Ayn Rand is a pervasive and increasingly powerful force in U.S.
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