Global Interconnections and Interdependence
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Overseas Aid

Overseas Aid | Global Interconnections and Interdependence | Scoop.it
Lots of people give money to help poor countries overseas. But how much is the right amount? Well that's a question the Government has been asking recently as it decides how much of its budget should be given to foreign aid. Let's take a look.
T.Heynes's insight:

Outcome: SSS3.7 Describes how Australian people, systems and communities are globally interconnected and recognises global responsibilities.

 

Content: Global interconnections and interdependence, eg communications, trade, international human rights agreements and organisations

 

The Behind the News video looks at how Australia spends the 5.7 billion dollars that will go towards foreign aid.

 

Watch the first 18 seconds of the video and then stop it on the “What would you spend the country's money on? Use this question to start a discussion about what the students would spend the money on if they had a choice. Draw a brainstorm on the board or on a big sheet of paper so that students can reflect on this while watching the rest of the video.

 

“Teachers need to be responsible for the pupils learning with technology. Educators need to be aware of the multifaceted nature of the process of learning with technology” (Younie, 2001). By having a video and then using the many different resources that go along with the BTN video so there is significant scope for educators to take the activities in any direction.

 

Australia “has stressed humanitarian concerns for the alleviation of poverty as being of primary importance” (Eldridge, 1985) for its aid programs. After all the activities, have a series of debates around the question “Should Australia give aid to other countries” where students may be able to argue other reasons to give aid (other than to end poverty), getting students to think about the positives and negatives of overseas aid and about its consequences, again both good and bad. If students hand in a transcript of their argument, the teacher can assess them on their persuasive texts, a component of the English curriculum (EN3-2A and EN3-8D).

 

This links to SSS3.7 as it shows that there is a connection between countries, an interdependence, where we offer aid and other services to improve the quality of life of other people. This, I feel, links to international human rights agreements.

 

Resources

Eldridge, P. (1985). The Jackson report on Australia's overseas aid program: Political options and prospects, Australian Outlook, 39, 23-32.

 

Younie, S in Leask, M. (2001). Issues in Teaching Using ICT. New York, NY: Taylor & Francis Group.

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Didj "u" Know - Big Artie: the Rugby League work of art

Arthur Beetson is quite literally a living legend A Rugby League Immortal who as a player and coach accomplished everything there is to achieve in his chosen sport
T.Heynes's insight:

Outcome: SSS3.7 Describes how Australian people, systems and communities are globally interconnected and recognises global responsibilities.

 

Content: Global interconnections and interdependence, eg communications, trade, international human rights agreements and organisations

 

This resource is an information page about Arthur Beetson, an Indigenous Rugby League player. The main focus of this resource is “Education…to develop and enhance cultural knowledge, understanding and respect for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people” (Oliver, 2013).

 

I think that it is extremely important to have an indigenous perspective on the curriculum, as it allows students to broaden their thinking on topics. Sport, where every child has some form of interest, can be used as a springboard into other activities to do with Indigenous Australians, especially for a group task researching famous Indigenous athletes. After reading the information together, compile an information sheet about Artie Beetson using a template, which will be given to students. Then supply a list of athletes and in groups of 2 or 3 get students to research one of the athletes and their achievements, recording information on the  template given. If you have another passion involving Indigenous Australians, for example in the fields of music or art, then this activity can be modified to use that knowledge.

 

Some athletes that could be researched are: Jesse Williams, Cathy Freeman, Nova Peris-Kneebone, Jade North, Lewis Jetta, Adam Goodes, Anthony Mundine, Evonne Goolagong, Lionel Rose, Greg Inglis, Jamal Idris or Kurtley Beale. After a set time period, come back together and get the students to present their information to others. An oral presentation about each athlete would link in to the literacy outcomes of talking and listening, although a presentation can be in any format you wish. Using descriptive assessment, makes explicit what the students need to know and be able to do (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011) and by using the template to gather all the information that you will be looking for when assessing, allows for creativity in the type of assessment you wish students to produce.  A fun way to display the information is for students to make a short film presenting their information.

 

This links to SSS3.7 as sport is a global phenomenon. Most of these athletes are involved in global sports and involved in tournaments/meets worldwide ie. Jade North is a Socceroo, showing the global interconnectedness of people.

 

Resources

Oliver, M. (2013). Brisbane centre a leader in curriculum-based Indigenous studies [online]. Independent Education, 43, 8-9.

 

Gilbert, R., & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching society and environment (4th ed.). South Melbourne, Vic.: Cengage Learning

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Refugees | Global Education

Refugees | Global Education | Global Interconnections and Interdependence | Scoop.it
T.Heynes's insight:

Outcome: SSS3.7 Describes how Australian people, systems and communities are globally interconnected and recognises global responsibilities.

 

Content: Global interconnections and interdependence, eg communications, trade, international human rights agreements and organisations

 

Refugees and their treatment, as well as their reasons for fleeing their homeland, are an important topic for many students. 1 in 4 Australians are migrants, and many can identify with the plight of refugees either in their immediate family or in their family history.

 

The Global Education page that has been posted here has a number of teaching activities that can be applied to the refugee case study, which is linked at the top of the page (or can be found at: http://www.globaleducation.edu.au/case-studies/burmese-refugees.html). The activities I have chosen focus on the Myanmar case study. As of March 31st, 2014 “There are an estimated 640, 747 internally displayed persons in Myanmar and 415, 373 refugees originating from the country” (Jolliffe, 2014), therefore ‘Activity 1: Experience flight’ is a good activity to start with.

 

“For children to have affective resonance with the curriculum they must feel some real connection to what is placed before them” (Dufficy, 2005) so before reading any case studies or watching any videos, the ‘reflect and imagine’ activities force students to create a personal connection to those people considering and attempting to flee their countries, giving them this ‘real connection’ to the issue. Students will come to class with different understandings and ideas about the needs of refugees and by imagining an experience of being forced to leave home to seek safety, those who say that they’d take a laptop, all their necklaces and their entire wardrobe will soon understand that the situation these people are in and the choices they need to undertake aren’t trivial but indeed, life and death situations. The rest of the activities then build on this understanding, with opportunities for individual, partner and small group work at various stages with a number of cross curricula links.

 

This resource links to SSS3.7 as refugees come under a number of human right agreements, which Australia, among other nations, has signed.

 

Resources

Jolliffe, K. (2014). Ceasefires and Durbale Solutions in Myanmar: a lessons learned review. United Nations high Commissioner for Refugees, 271.

 

Dufficy, P. (2005). Designing learning for diverse classrooms. Sydney, NSW: PEETA.

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Earth Hour 2014 Spider-Man Global Highlights

Earth Hour 2014 has completed a record journey across the planet, uniting people from 162 countries and territories in more than 7000 cities and towns. With ...
T.Heynes's insight:

Outcome: SSS3.7 Describes how Australian people, systems and communities are globally interconnected and recognises global responsibilities.

 

Content: Global interconnections and interdependence, eg communications, trade, international human rights agreements and organisations

 

Earth Hour is a worldwide movement organised by WWF. The event encourages individuals, communities, households and businesses to turn off their non-essential lights for one hour, from 8:30 to 9:30 p.m. on the last Saturday in March, as a symbol of their commitment to the planet. This 3 minute Youtube video shows how some of the 7000 cities that participate in Earth hour approached this event in 2014. 

 

Earth Hour founder and Executive Director Andy Ridley says “everyone from citizens to businesses, school children to world leaders, need to believe they can make a difference” (Business World, 2012). I have found that over the last few years Earth Hour has become a more popular event, yet there are still millions of people who don’t participate. The importance of students developing ‘digital literacies’ is emphasized by Lankshear and Knobel (2006) through the suggestion of engaging them with a vast array of texts in the classroom that use digital technology. By using this video and getting students to analyse why this is the case is an important step, to their education, as only by understanding why people do things can we attempt to change the situation.

 

After watching the video, students in this stage 3 class can be involved in creating a school event based around the idea of Earth Hour, such as going without technology for a day and therefore saving power, or reducing the amount of waste they produce that goes into landfill. These simple events or programs can be created by students and implemented, helping students recognise that they are global citizens. Some fundraising can also be undertaken, with proceeds being sent to WWF.

This links to SSS3.7 as it shows interconnections across the world through a global organisation – WWF.

 

For more information about countries that participate in Earth Hour visit http://www.earthhour.org/earth-hour-around-world

 

Resources

Business World. (2012). Earth Hour Reaches Space! Business World Publishing Corporation.

 

Lankshear, C., & Knobel, M. (2006). New literacies everyday practices and classroom learning (2nd ed.). Maidenhead: Open University Press.

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DUST - Picture Book

DUST - Picture Book | Global Interconnections and Interdependence | Scoop.it

'For all children who do not wake up safe and comfortable'
(Cover inscription)

This picture book is poignant and confronting, inspired by famine and crisis, and emotively depicts the death of a child. The book was written and illustrated in response to the food shortages affecting 3.6 million people in Niger in 2005. The proceeds from the sale of the book go to ‘Save the Children Australia’, to provide aid to those who need it most.   

 

It is the simplicity of the text and the quality of the images that make this book so powerful. The book is distressing, but so is the plight of the people it represents. It is about stillness, and sadness and the impact of hunger, but leaves us with the feeling that we can change. The second to last image I think is the most confronting, a man scrapes his leftover food into the bin where there is a newspaper with the headline ‘Famine claims more...” the image is accompanied by the text, “the world has shut its ears and moved on”.

This book would be helpful in understanding the seriousness of the situations that require international aid. It is about a child, and therefore should resonate with the children in the class, and although it is sad, there is still hope at the end, that we might be able to change it if we change ourselves. The book could address more outcomes than SSS3.7 and SSS3.8 depending on how it was used.

 

Students could create their own images to tell a similar story about a current aid issue. They could gather information from NGOs (including save the children) and other sites (such as AusAID and news sites) to locate and find out about the situation, before presenting their case study visually. 

 


Via Michelle Wheeler
T.Heynes's insight:

Outcome: SSS3.7 Describes how Australian people, systems and communities are globally interconnected and recognises global responsibilities.

 

Content: Global interconnections and interdependence, eg communications, trade, international human rights agreements and organisations

 

“In a perfect world, this book would not exist. But we do not live in a perfect world. Even if we all learn to live in peace, there will still be millions of people who need our help.” (back cover).  This picture book depicts the plight of a child who is struggling to survive with the resources that they have, highlighting the need for overseas aid for development. Development is “'the way in which the quality of human life and society is improved' and as integrally linked to both growth and equity” (Eldridge, 1985).

 

The subject matter is emotionally confrontational, based on the 2005 drought in Niger, which in itself is enough to drive the message home that Australia should give aid to other countries in need. The book has many illustrators, who hadn’t seen the other pages of the book before submitting their work, which means is that there is little linking the illustrations together except for the theme of famine and the need for aid. For this reason, you will have to judge whether this book is suitable for your stage 3 class as, due to this subject matter, it won’t be a book that can be used with all children.

 

If you do use this resource though, visual literacy (which can be found under EN4-2A) is an important skill that can be developed, as there are few words in the book and the pictures are the main form of conveying the story. Starting a discussion about other global issues that need Australia’s aid can end with students creating their own version of the book. As a class, students can decide on another aid issue that has been talked about and write a short 20 line story (or however many students there are in the class) so that each student gets a line on which they create an accompanying image. This gets students thinking about their visual literacy while ascertaining their level of understanding about the topic. There is a need to examine the complex relations between pedagogy, technology and learners, whilst remembering that technology itself…is embedded in existing social relations which can replicate existing inequaliites”  (Younie, 2001, p.211) when using ICT in education. By having a resource that can be accessed without technology, which anyone can access, you are eliminating this inequality.

 

This links to SSS3.7 as various charity organisations are involved in the interconnections and interdependence of countries. The proceeds of the book go towards the ‘Save The Children’ charity (since being published in 2007, the book has raised over A$250,000 according to Colin Thompson’s website) highlighting the aid connections Australia has with other countries in order to improve their quality of life.

 

Resources

Eldridge, P. (1985). The Jackson report on Australia's overseas aid program: Political options and prospects, Australian Outlook, 39, 23-32.

 

Younie, S in Leask, M. (2001). Issues in Teaching Using ICT. New York, NY: Taylor & Francis Group.

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