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IB Part 3: Global Interactions
IB Geography Higher Core Unit
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Ship Shipping Ships

Ship Shipping Ships | IB Part 3: Global Interactions | Scoop.it

"This is a ship-shipping ship, shipping shipping ships."


Via Seth Dixon
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jim dzialo's curator insight, October 16, 2013 2:54 PM

Pretty sure that doesn't fit in the panama canal

 

L.Long's curator insight, February 16, 4:28 AM

The two industries that are the real backbone of globalization are transportation and communication.  What has accelerated the pace of global interconnectedness is the scale of these devices and their ubiquity in facilitating massive global commerce.

Shanelle Zaino's curator insight, September 10, 2:33 PM

#shippingships

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Globalization

The world is becoming more and more interconnected. Globalization changes how people consume, work and live almost everywhere on the world. Today, many economic, political, cultural or ecological relationships are not explainable from a national perspective. At the same time, a controversial debate about the consequences of globalization has begun.

 

Questions to ponder: What are the driving forces behind globalization? What areas are most impacted by globalization?  How does globalization benefit some, and adversely impact others? Why?

 


Via Seth Dixon, Marc Crawford , Mankato East High School
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Kyle Toner's comment, September 10, 2012 12:31 PM
Globalization is an overall positive drive. In time globalization needs to mold developing countries who are in need of a better political and economical system
Sheyna Vargas's comment, September 10, 2012 1:16 PM
After watching this video, it is becoming clear that Globalization isn't just one-sided. While making it easier to connect with people all around the world and lowering costs for businesses, it is also causing harm to less developed countries. The question that pops into my head is, "Does the ends justify the means?" One could argue either point.
First, Globalization has made the world a "smaller" place. Not only is it easier to communicate with one another on different sides of the world but it’s also easier and cheaper to transport goods across nations and bodies of water. These are obviously benefits to both the developed countries and lesser developed countries in getting goods in timely fashions and producing jobs in both areas. Globalization also creates competition amongst developing nations to learn or advance in new skills to bring and/or keep jobs in their country/area.
On the other hand, Globalization is also wreaking havoc on cultural diversity around the global with Western music, food, and products becoming more available. Western culture is basically looked upon as the “money making” culture. Globalization, by creating competition is also harming local business in newly developing countries. This drives the prices down for the local businesses and makes them work for less.
Maricarmen Husson's curator insight, May 3, 2013 11:39 AM

Globalización Globalization

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Economics behind Gangnam Style

The viral hit isn't a fluke. South Korea has been cultivating a global music business for decades.

 

You may already know that I've been fascinating watching the cultural diffusion of Gangnam Style throughout the world as mentioned previously.  This NPR podcast looks at the economic infrastructure of the South Korean music industry that explains in greater detail how this video went viral.  The distribution of this video is dependent in part on the technological sophistication and economic strategies of South Korea to associate their brands with cultural cachet.  

 

Tags: popular culture, industry, diffusion, globalization, technology, economic, unit 6 industry.


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America and the West’s dirty little secret

America and the West’s dirty little secret | IB Part 3: Global Interactions | Scoop.it
By importing goods from polluting factories in Asia, Americans and others in developed countries underwrite carbon emissions...

 

This is a compelling question: are reductions in greenhouse gases best measured by production or consumption?  The question that this article is posing is essentially trying to find blame for greenhouse gas emmision, but thinking geographically, ponders where along the commodity chain should the bulk of the blame be placed.  What do you think?  


Via Seth Dixon, Evie Plumb
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