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Current affairs for students, parents, business professionals, teachers and psychologists.
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Can Meditation Make You More Compassionate?

Can Meditation Make You More Compassionate? | Global Insights | Scoop.it

In a number of religious traditions, it is believed that meditation can improve compassion. Now, a study in the journalPsychological Science finds hard evidence to back that claim.

 

Recent research has already suggested meditation can help individuals lower stress and ease physical disorders such as hypertension or arthritis. The new study extends those beneficial effects to interpersonal harmony and compassion. 

 

Researchers from Northeastern and Harvard universities, led by David DeSteno, Ph.D., invited participants to complete eight-week trainings in two types of meditation. After the sessions, they were put to a test.

 

By RICK NAUERT PHD Senior News Editor


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Nine Ways Successful People Defeat Stress

Nine Ways Successful People Defeat Stress | Global Insights | Scoop.it

1. Have self-compassion.

Self-compassion is, in essence, cutting yourself some slack. It's being willing to look at your mistakes or failures with kindness and understanding — without harsh criticism or defensiveness.Studies show that people who are self-compassionate are happier, more optimistic, and less anxious and depressed. That's probably not surprising. But here's the kicker: they are moresuccessful, too. Most of us believe that we need to be hard on ourselves to perform at our best, but it turns out that's 100 percent wrong. A dose of self-compassion when things are at their most difficult can reduce your stress and improve your performance, by making it easier to learn from your mistakes. So remember that to err is human, and give yourself a break.


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How Not to Raise a Bully: The Early Roots of Empathy

How Not to Raise a Bully: The Early Roots of Empathy | Global Insights | Scoop.it
State laws and school-district rules may help curb bullying on campus, but many researchers suggest a better way is not to raise a bully in the first place

 

In Athens, future leaders were brought up in a more nurturing and peaceful way, at home with their mothers and nurses, starting education in music and poetry at age 6. They became pioneers of democracy, art, theater and culture. "Just like we can train people to kill, the same is true with empathy. You can be taught to be a Spartan or an Athenian — and you can taught to be both," says Teny Gross, executive director of the outreach group Institute for the Study and Practice of Nonviolence in Providence, R.I., and a former sergeant in the Israeli army


By Maia Szalavitz
 


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The paradox of empathy: When empathy hurts | Counseling Today

The paradox of empathy: When empathy hurts | Counseling Today | Global Insights | Scoop.it

We normally think of empathy in counseling as a benevolent act in which the insightful counselor deeply understands the grateful client. Carl Rogers considered this empathic connection the centerpiece of a successful counseling relationship. He offered the following metaphor of the imprisoned client being emotionally liberated by the counselor:....

 

Such images of empathic connection have become common wisdom in the counseling profession. We strive for this empathic understanding of our clients to establish a warm and trusting relationship. But is it possible that instead of the client welcoming this level of closeness and understanding, he or she might regard the counselor’s ability to “see the whole person” as an intrusion?

 

Eric W. Cowan, Jack Presbury & Lennis G. Echterling


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Is Empathy the Antidote to Bullying?

Is Empathy the Antidote to Bullying? | Global Insights | Scoop.it

This idea of empathy is one that will not only have a bearing on our children's school lives, but also on the adults they will grow into being. The culture of bullying extends way beyond teasing in the schoolyard and far into the reaches of how our society operates.

 

Corporations bullying the planet and its resources for profit, politicians bullying citizens for control and dominance, police bullying peaceful protesters out of fear of revolution, countries bullying countries in the form of war. Many people excuse both bullying and this type of destructive systemic geopolitical activity as "human nature," but according to Jeremy Rifkin, author ofThe Empathic Civilization, empathy is our natural state of being.

 

Toni Nagy

 


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10 Keys to Real Entrepreneur Mentoring Satisfaction

Every entrepreneur can learn from a mentor, no matter how confident or successful they have been to date. Even one of the richest, Bill Gates, still values his friend Warren Buffett as his mentor. Yet these relationships require special efforts on both sides to be productive and satisfying. Mentoring is not as simple as one person giving the other all the right answers.

 

 


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Molding Future Leaders: 4 Tips for Mentoring Young Professionals

Molding Future Leaders: 4 Tips for Mentoring Young Professionals | Global Insights | Scoop.it
Here on ToddNielsen.com, we often discuss how we can develop leadership qualities within ourselves and within organizations. Established leaders, also have an obligation to pass the baton and help develop leadership in others.

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Mentoring in the Workplace: Empathy by the Back Door

Mentoring in the Workplace: Empathy by the Back Door | Global Insights | Scoop.it

While there are many private sector mentoring programmes in place, these are too often seen as 'nice-to-have', but not essential.

 

Successful mentoring relationships often transcend this as mentors gain an understanding of the world view of another generation and equally, mentees can help senior colleagues to see new perspectives and shifts in societal behaviour, for instance, the growing importance of social networks. These partnerships, inevitably, bring a new level of empathy into the workplace as greater understanding between groups of people develops. This empathy can increase mutual respect for co-workers and remind us of the nuances of an individual's needs, as opposed to just focusing on generic rules and regulations.

 

Rose Schreiber
Consultant 


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11 Health Benefits Of Dragon Fruit | American Anti Aging Mag

11 Health Benefits Of Dragon Fruit | American Anti Aging Mag | Global Insights | Scoop.it

The nutritional benefits of dragon fruit makes it a very popular choice among people. Discover the benefits of this exotic fruit.


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Top 10 Richest Vitamin C Food

Top 10 Richest Vitamin C Food | Global Insights | Scoop.it
Vitamin C Vitamin C, also known as ascorbic acid, is a water-soluble vitamin.

 

Guavas are often marketed as “superfruits”, being rich in Vitamins A and C, and if the seeds are eaten too, omega-3 and omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids and especially high levels of dietary. Guava contains over four times more Vitamin C than orange and also has good levels of the dietary minerals, potassium, magnesium, and generally a broad, low-calorie profile of essential nutrients.

 

Guava is a nutritious fruit which has numerous health benefits. It is considered a super fruit for its rich antioxidants, including vitamin C, polyphenols and caratenoids. The guava fruit is most plentiful in tropical climates such as Florida and Central America. It has a sweet flavor and ranges in color from green to red. You can drink the juice of raw guavas or guava leaves. You can also consume guava raw, as you would any other citrus fruit.

 

Vitamin C is an important antioxidant found in abundance in the guava fruit. Guavas contain even more vitamin C than oranges. One guava fruit contains approximately 377mg of vitamin C. Vitamin C supports your immune system by protecting it against pathogens and fighting disease. Just one guava provides you with more than 100 percent of the USDA recommended daily intake of vitamin C. Guavas average four to five times more vitamin C per serving than other citrus fruits.

Other Antioxidants

Guava contains both carotenoids and polyphenols. Carotenoids and polyphenols act as antioxidants and support your immune system by eliminating free radicals and protecting your body's cells against damage. Carotenoids are especially important for ocular health and skin health. Both carotenoids and polyohenols have also been thought to prevent certain types of cancer (especially breast cancer and skin cancer). These potent antioxidants are only found in plant sources. Look for guavas that are a reddish-orange color. These contain the most carotenoids and polyphenols.

Minerals

Guava contains important minerals, including potassium in the amount of 688 mg, which is 20 percent of the USDA recommended value. Guava also contains copper in the amount of 0.4 mg, which is 19 percent of the USDA recommended value. Potassium is important for a variety of metabolic functions in your body. It transmits brain signals and maintains your blood osmotic balance. Potassium also regulates your heart function. Copper is an important essential mineral that supports your vital organs, bones and tissue. Copper also helps break down enzymes in order for you to use nutrients more efficiently.

Eating just one serving of guava every day can increase your immune system function and your overall health. Try topping your salads with diced guava, or using guava juice in your smoothies.


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Is Watermelon Good for You? • Find Out Here!

Is Watermelon Good for You? • Find Out Here! | Global Insights | Scoop.it
Learn about the benefits of eating watermelon, including how this juicy fruit is packed with antioxidants such as beta-carotene, lycopene, and vitamin C!
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Quick Bytes: Pomegranate

Quick Bytes: Pomegranate | Global Insights | Scoop.it
There are many pomegranate health benefits. The pomegranate is a type of fruit that is becoming more and more popular. Fruit is loaded with vitamins, minerals, fiber, and antioxidants that are essential for good health and optimal growth.

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Cherries – More Than Just Antioxidants - Analyst Insight from Euromonitor International

Cherries – More Than Just Antioxidants - Analyst Insight from Euromonitor International | Global Insights | Scoop.it
Euromonitor International explores the health benefits of cherries and analyses the fruit's promising growth areas, such as sports nutrition, pain management and combating sleeplessness.

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Enlightening research shows meditation boosts compassion

Enlightening research shows meditation boosts compassion | Global Insights | Scoop.it
Psychology professor David DeSteno’s lab is the first to study the social implications of meditation, a practice well known to improve one’s physical and psychological well-being.

 

In a new study led by Condon, DeSteno’s team in the Social Emo­tions Group showed that even a brief period of med­i­ta­tion training is indeed enough to boost one’s com­pas­sion toward a suf­fering stranger more than five­fold. The results will soon be pub­lished in the journalPsy­cho­log­ical Sci­ence.

With funding from the Mind and Life Institute, DeSteno’s team recruited more than three dozen indi­vid­uals inter­ested in pur­suing med­i­ta­tion training. 

 

 Now DeSteno’s team is pur­suing research on the mech­a­nisms behind the observed phe­nom­enon. For instance, it could be related to a height­ened aware­ness of one’s sur­round­ings or an increased sense of empathy. 

 

by Angela Herring


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Eileen Cardillo's curator insight, April 7, 2013 9:32 AM

This study seems of interest for two reasons: 1) it considers compassionate behavior in a more ecologically valid way than behavioral experiments to date, and 2) the increased probability of a compassionate response was observed in meditators who both did and did not have compassion explicitly integrated into their training. This latter effect indicates that attention training is sufficient to increase pro-social behavior. No special affective or ethical instruction was necessary to change participants' social norms; rather, the change fell naturally out of the attention practice.

 

Data of this sort suggests that explicit ethical training (sila) may not be necessary to elicit increased pro-social behavior, an important finding for those (like me) interested in teaching meditation in a secular fashion. My working hypothesis is that changes in ethical behavior and values are a predictable byproduct of the cultivation of attention and awareness, a lawful relationship that is highly probable even if not absolute. In western psychology we distinguish detached, cognitive capacities like attention from affective, value-laden ones like compassion or empathy. Perhaps, however, awareness is the real backbone of moral character, scaffolding the emergence of pro-social traits like compassion.  I look forward to reading the actual paper when it's out and, fingers crossed, seeing it replicated and extended. 

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How to Create a Compassion Placebo | Placebo Effect

How to Create a Compassion Placebo | Placebo Effect | Global Insights | Scoop.it

This article demonstrates how lessons of placebo effect can support people in creating "compassion placebos" and living more compassionate and loving lives...

 

Each of us has all the tools we need to bring compassion into our lives and the world. All it requires is that we hone the lessons of the placebo effect, and actively seek to surround ourselves with compassionate observations, beliefs, and actions (i.e. create a “compassion placebo”). In doing so, we won’t just be changing the quality of our own lives, we will be doing our part in stewarding the world toward a global compassion it must find if so that we may hand a sustainable, loving world to our grandchildren and great-grandchildren.

 

Danial


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» News on Couples and Empathy: Reader Beware - Parenting Tips

» News on Couples and Empathy: Reader Beware - Parenting Tips | Global Insights | Scoop.it
The importance of empathy for marital satisfaction and some differences between men and women in new research.

 

The results of a new research study underscoring the importance of empathy for marital satisfaction, just hit the web and weekly news magazines. Before you ask yourself why in God’s name we needed research to confirm such an obvious observation, let me explain how I came upon this and why I chose to write about it.

 

By DEBRA MANCHESTER MACMANNIS, LCSW


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Sign of empathy: These monkeys mimic faces

Sign of empathy: These monkeys mimic faces | Global Insights | Scoop.it

The ability to mimic the facial expressions of others is thought to be linked to empathy. It's known that humans and orangutans "ape" each other in this way, but gelada monkeys appear to do it too, a new study shows.

 

"This mimicry relates to an internal emotional connection," said neuroscientist Pier Francesco Ferrari of the University of Parma in Italy, who co-authored the study published March 28 in the journal Scientific Reports. It shows that "basic forms of empathy are present in other species that are not apes," Ferrari told LiveScience.

 

 By Tanya LewisLiveScience 


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"Empathy is the invisible force that holds society together"

"Empathy is the invisible force that holds society together" | Global Insights | Scoop.it
For four centuries, we have embraced a narrow view of human nature. Roman Krznaric has set out to widen our perspective. He talked with Martin Eiermann about human empathy, self-absorbed psychologists, and the importance of a little bit of madness.

 

"Empathy is the invisible force that holds society together"

For four centuries, we have embraced a narrow view of human nature. Roman Krznaric has set out to widen our perspective. He talked with Martin Eiermann about human empathy, self-absorbed psychologists, and the importance of a little bit of madness.

 

 see Culture of Empathy Builder: Roman Krznaric 
http://bit.ly/yogvQs


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Kieran Sheedy's comment, March 30, 2013 2:06 PM
Empathy is indeed the root of civilisation, but it has a dark side. http://prezi.com/inuyaikepkgp/empathy-civilisation/
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5 Methods for Social Leadership: Try Reverse Mentoring - Forbes

5 Methods for Social Leadership: Try Reverse Mentoring - Forbes | Global Insights | Scoop.it
How do you build real trust in a workplace that is both social and multi-generational? Reverse mentoring is one way to do it while creating space to build enduring relationships that transcend age and pay grade.

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Meet me at the prison gates: how mentoring can give hope and help - and save the taxpayer billions

Meet me at the prison gates: how mentoring can give hope and help - and save the taxpayer billions | Global Insights | Scoop.it
Colin Lambert hated prison. “Even when I was in Borstal as a kid, I hated it. I swore I would never be coming back.”

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The Misery of Mentoring Millennials

The Misery of Mentoring Millennials | Global Insights | Scoop.it
Younger workers are shunning the one-on-one mentorship model of the past in favor of a social network

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Don Dea's curator insight, March 23, 2013 2:55 AM

For a new generation of workers, the idea of seeking out a single career confidant is as old-fashioned as a three-martini lunch. Sure, seasoned professionals still offer valuable wisdom to those on the way up

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Health Benefits of Lime | Fruit | Health Benefits

Health Benefits of Lime | Fruit | Health Benefits | Global Insights | Scoop.it
The health benefits of lime include weight loss, skin care, good digestion, relief from constipation (I eat limes.

Health Benefits of Lime | Fruit | Health Benefits - http://t.co/YSMNxh9N)...

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Benefits of Blackberries

Benefits of Blackberries | Global Insights | Scoop.it
New analysis is under way on the health benefits of blackberry fruit. The blackberry fruit is known to consist of polyphenol antioxidants. A polyphenol antioxidant is a type of antioxidant recognized...

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Prickly Pear Health Benefits

Prickly Pear Health Benefits | Global Insights | Scoop.it
Prickly Pear Health Benefits. The fruit of the prickly pear cactus is rich in magnesium, an essential mineral that contributes to the activities of enzymes, promotes healthy heart and kidney function and helps your body produce energy.

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Watermelon Can Improve Heart Health While Controlling Weight Gain

Watermelon Can Improve Heart Health While Controlling Weight Gain | Global Insights | Scoop.it

Although apples are the most commonly known fruit to give people great health benefits, a new study has found that eating watermelon can play a significant role in cardiovascular health.

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