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WomanStats Maps

WomanStats Maps | Global education = global understanding | Scoop.it

"The WomanStats Project is the most comprehensive compilation of information on the status of women in the world. The Project facilitates understanding the linkage between the situation of women and the security of nation-states. We comb the extant literature and conduct expert interviews to find qualitative and quantitative information on over 310 indicators of women's status in 174 countries. Our Database expands daily, and access to it is free of charge.  Click here if you are a new to the project."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 30, 2013 7:48 PM
I have linked to the WomanStats Project in the past because their global datasets and maps are perfect for get students to explore a potential topic that might be of interest to them.  I'm resharing this now because they have recently updated their maps page to include 28 statistical measures to indicate the status of women around the world (including this one on the gendered discrepancy of access to secondary education).  The WomanStats Project provides important data and maps regarding issues of gender, access and equity with a spatial perspective.

Mary Rack's curator insight, March 31, 2013 7:44 AM

Amazing and thought-provoking. 

Daniel Landi's curator insight, April 1, 2013 2:08 AM

Topic link: Population and Change: Gender

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Earth's City Lights

Earth's City Lights | Global education = global understanding | Scoop.it
NASA's Visible Earth catalog of NASA images and animations of our home planet...

 

This classic image is full of classroom applications.  The first impulse of most students is to note that this image will show us where people live, where the cities are or some other comment that speaks to the magnitude of the population in the white areas.  Let them analyze this for more time, and they'll notice that population isn't the whole story of this image.  A place like India shines, but less brightly than the eastern part of the United States.  I like to point out that South Korea appears to be an island (because North Korea is literally blacked out).  Politics, development, affluence and population information are all embedded in this image.  As with all maps, the more information you have about the place in question (in this case, Earth), the more meaningful information you can extract out of the map. 

 

Tags: remote sensing, worldwide, consumption, poverty, population, spatial, political, regions.


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Matt Mallinson's comment, September 18, 2012 12:35 PM
This image is pretty amazing to see. It shows what parts of the world are more modernized just by the lights seen from space. Looking at the U.S. and Europe, they are lit up very bright because they are richer parts of the world. As you look at places like Africa and some parts of South America, they are shown in darkness due to poorer areas in those regions.
Michelle Carvajal's comment, September 18, 2012 6:07 PM
I was impressed with the explanation of this picture especially for the simple fact that I thought it was a picture that depicted the population of certain areas of each country. Places like Africa, Brazil, areas of Mexico, and Southern US are not lit because of the areas of forest, desert and less population. Very nice picture. -Michelle Carvajal-
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The Difference between the United Kingdom, Great Britain and England Explained


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Al Picozzi's curator insight, October 7, 2013 12:10 AM

A great and entertaining way to explain this part of Europe.  I know I have in the past used the terms England, Great Britain and the United Kingdom to all refer to the same thing. It was also amazing to see that people are the same everywhere in that the people in Wales do not consider themselves British, much the same way the people in Sicily consider themselves Sicilain and not Italian. 

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 8, 12:09 PM

As an outsider looking in the concept of the United Kingdom is a little confusing. We are taught to view Scotland as its own country, but they are countries within a larger structure. This video makes what would confuse many Americans and condenses it into a clear video that is just about 5 mins.

Kaitlin Young's curator insight, December 12, 4:38 PM

Many people often interchange the UK, Great Britain, and England, but in reality, they all describe different different things. The UK is a country of four countries, each with equal power, including Scotland, Northern Ireland, England, and Wales but they are all considered British citizens.UK is a political term, describing a country. Great Britain is a physical geographical term describing the land mass containing Scotland, Wales, and England.  The British Isles refers to both Great Britain and the Island of Ireland. All of these terms describe different things, being characterized by either political affiliation or geographic characteristics. 

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The Difference between the United Kingdom, Great Britain and England Explained


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Al Picozzi's curator insight, October 7, 2013 12:10 AM

A great and entertaining way to explain this part of Europe.  I know I have in the past used the terms England, Great Britain and the United Kingdom to all refer to the same thing. It was also amazing to see that people are the same everywhere in that the people in Wales do not consider themselves British, much the same way the people in Sicily consider themselves Sicilain and not Italian. 

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 8, 12:09 PM

As an outsider looking in the concept of the United Kingdom is a little confusing. We are taught to view Scotland as its own country, but they are countries within a larger structure. This video makes what would confuse many Americans and condenses it into a clear video that is just about 5 mins.

Kaitlin Young's curator insight, December 12, 4:38 PM

Many people often interchange the UK, Great Britain, and England, but in reality, they all describe different different things. The UK is a country of four countries, each with equal power, including Scotland, Northern Ireland, England, and Wales but they are all considered British citizens.UK is a political term, describing a country. Great Britain is a physical geographical term describing the land mass containing Scotland, Wales, and England.  The British Isles refers to both Great Britain and the Island of Ireland. All of these terms describe different things, being characterized by either political affiliation or geographic characteristics. 

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Internat'l agreement to end child soldiers

With #stopkony trending on twitter, there is growing interest in the concept of child soldiers.  This is a great video to discuss the issue beyond Central Africa and other international efforts to end the use of child soldiers. 


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Zetas Mexico's 'biggest cartel'

Zetas Mexico's 'biggest cartel' | Global education = global understanding | Scoop.it
The Zetas are now the largest cartel in Mexico, overtaking their bitter rival, the Sinaloa cartel, a report by US security firm Stratfor suggests. 

 

When the Sinaloa cartel was the 'big dog,' they had a tacit understanding with the government and the government would target other drug syndicates and basically leave the important members of 'La Federacion' alone.  The Sinaloans operate primarily through bribery and corruption while the Zetas specialize in horrific brutality.  Now that the Zetas have muscled their way into more turf and more influential networks, how will that reshape the geopolitical paradigm?  What with the effect be for Mexican citizens and for those on both sides of the border?   This is not a good turn of events.


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Joshua Choiniere's comment, September 26, 2012 11:36 AM
The Zetas through the use of extreme force have become one of the most powerful and feared cartels in Mexico. Instead of bribeing groups or polticians they use kidnapping, rape, death to achieve what they want. This is incredible dangerous for not only Mexico but for the World because as this article says they are pushing into South American and exporting into other parts of the world. So I think this problem is not only the Mexican Goverments problem but everyones, we all should put a stop to this sort of group.
James Hobson's curator insight, September 23, 12:21 PM

(Mexico topic 5)

It seems to me that as Mexico's economy evolves, so do its drug cartels. Just as businesses expand and take monopoly over smaller ones, it looks like the same process is occurring with cartels. My educated guess would be that this is not just a coincidence, but rather the two are strongly correlated and interconnected. Though I  am not an expect on the topic and there is surely much to be researched, I believe that advances in infrastructure such as the Internet, telecom, and freeways (to name just a few) benefit both the legal economy and illegal cartels by being utilized and exploited in the same manner.

Shanelle Zaino's curator insight, October 16, 9:01 PM

This is an interesting piece. My question is :since it was written over 2 years ago have things made a turn for the better? Has violence decreased ?Has there been a decrease in the amount of drugs being smuggled? This article talks about the decrease in the US ,what about  Europe or Australia?  Is the government doing everything it can? So many questions I feel this article left me with more uncertainty then information.

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Human Conflict Seen From Space

Human Conflict Seen From Space | Global education = global understanding | Scoop.it

I'll let Douglas Keeney's own words and this image speak for themselves: "The geography of human conflict as seen from space at night. The Strait of Hormuz as seen at night from the space station is a beautiful lesson in the geography of conflict. How much we learn by simply tracing the fingers of human populations as seen superimposed over the geography of Earth. Enjoy." 

-From Lights of Mankind: Earth at Night From Space

 

What would a picture look like from a drone's perspective?  Where are these places that are being targeted?  This Instagram account is incredibly thought-provoking and informative.


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U.S. Intelligence Says Water Shortages Threaten Stability

U.S. Intelligence Says Water Shortages Threaten Stability | Global education = global understanding | Scoop.it

"Competition for increasingly scarce water in the next decade will fuel instability in regions such as South Asia and the Middle East that are important to U.S. national security, according to a U.S. intelligence report."

 

Geographic thinking is about uncovering the spatial connections between issues that on the surface might not seem related.  Multinational river basins are a perfect example of environmental resources that demand international cooperation for successful management, and it regions of scarcity and population growth, it is easy to envision clashing viewpoints on how to fairly share such resources.

 

Discussion questions: What geographic themes are evident in this article? What geographic problems could exacerbate the problem? What could alleviate these issues in the future?


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Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 23, 2:22 PM

Water is a huge resources and obviously something that we use everyday and in the US take for granted because there are many countries suffereing from sortages such as this nation. Which of the following it is threatening not just the stability of the nation but the stability of the people and the society that make up that nation.

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The Difference between the United Kingdom, Great Britain and England Explained


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Al Picozzi's curator insight, October 7, 2013 12:10 AM

A great and entertaining way to explain this part of Europe.  I know I have in the past used the terms England, Great Britain and the United Kingdom to all refer to the same thing. It was also amazing to see that people are the same everywhere in that the people in Wales do not consider themselves British, much the same way the people in Sicily consider themselves Sicilain and not Italian. 

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 8, 12:09 PM

As an outsider looking in the concept of the United Kingdom is a little confusing. We are taught to view Scotland as its own country, but they are countries within a larger structure. This video makes what would confuse many Americans and condenses it into a clear video that is just about 5 mins.

Kaitlin Young's curator insight, December 12, 4:38 PM

Many people often interchange the UK, Great Britain, and England, but in reality, they all describe different different things. The UK is a country of four countries, each with equal power, including Scotland, Northern Ireland, England, and Wales but they are all considered British citizens.UK is a political term, describing a country. Great Britain is a physical geographical term describing the land mass containing Scotland, Wales, and England.  The British Isles refers to both Great Britain and the Island of Ireland. All of these terms describe different things, being characterized by either political affiliation or geographic characteristics. 

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Invisible Children: Kony 2012

KONY 2012 is a film and campaign by Invisible Children that aims to make Joseph Kony famous, not to celebrate him, but to raise support for his arrest and set a precedent for international justice.

 

This needs to be included for many reasons.  1) The geopolitical problem of child soldiers and endemic warfare in Sub-Saharan Africa needs to be analyzed from a spatial and geographic perspective.  2) The social media aspects of this campaign highlight many of the traits of globalization and is a major online movement right now. 3) This would be a perfect opportunity to have a political activist moment in your class (seriously, who isn't opposed to mass murder?).  4) We can teach our classes that geographers are not just going to learn about all the crap that is wrong with our Earth...we are going to fix it and use our resources to improve the human condition. 

 

For a cultural analysis of the this video, see this NPR article. Yes the video is filled with oversimplifications and a poor cultural lens, but it has started a conversation and a conversation with students that I feel is worth having.

http://www.npr.org/blogs/thetwo-way/2012/03/08/148235430/while-controversial-kony-2012-has-put-focus-on-atrocities

 

The site mentioned in the video is:  http://www.invisiblechildren.com

 

For my cultural musings on the video, see the comments section. 

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Maegan Connor's curator insight, December 17, 2013 8:22 PM

I was really glad to find this video on Professor Dixon's scoop it page because even after all that happened concerning the facts behind the video, it was still a very important part of 2012.  This video was not truthful as many later discovered and the man who led the movement was later arrested for indecency, bashing some of his credibility, but this video still drew uncountable amounts of attention to the poor people of Africa and the genocide and suffering of child soldiers. 

It is important for people to be aware of the problems in other parts of the world, especially senseless violence that has taken place in several African countries so this video did the world a service by alerting teens and adults to the horrors that take place on a continent that looks hopeless to the foreign eye.

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Does democracy stifle economic growth?

TED Talks Economist Yasheng Huang compares China to India, and asks how China's authoritarian rule contributed to its astonishing economic growth -- leading to a big question: Is democracy actually holding India back?

 

This compelling TedTalk explores the links between economic development and governmental style, oversight and influence.  While the speaker mainly discusses politics and economics in the context of China and India, Pakistan, Russia, North and South Korea are all mentioned.      


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Matt Mallinson's comment, November 21, 2012 11:11 AM
Democracy can stifle economic growth. War will definitely stifle economic growth. North Korea doesn't look like they're going to stop fighting South Korea, if only they would combine their lands, they would probably be a much better nation as one.
Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 15, 2:17 PM

For Americans the idea that democracy can be anything but sunshine and rainbows is a hard pill to swallow. There is evidence that supports the contrary. Although democracy has the moral high ground, authoritative governments can grow at a faster rate because it does not have to address resistance where democracy fosters debate and dissent. In India, millions of people will not agree on everything and therefore progress can be slow going.