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Missing Girls...

"In India, China and many other parts of the world today, girls are killed, aborted and abandoned simply because they are girls. The United Nations estimates as many as 200 million girls are missing in the world today because of this so-called 'gendercide' or femicide."


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Evelyn's curator insight, January 14, 8:37 AM

Girls should not be gone just because they're girls. Boys and girls are equal, girls shouldnt be treated different than boys because we are both equal. if girls were gone completly then they wont be able to have kids and family. imagine if your mom was abandoned just because she is a girl. how would that make you feel? 

Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 7, 10:30 PM

The way the people of China and India treat baby girls is upsetting. India and China eliminate more girls than the number of girls born every year in America; that is disturbing to think about. When a couple decides to have a child they should own up to the responsibility and take care of the baby despite the gender. I know of several people who adopted Chinese female children, luckily they had a chance at life, unfortunately, not many baby girls in China or India have that chance.  

                                                                                 

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 9:10 PM

Females might be the underdogs of men forever. Hopefully this is not the case but it just seems like it will be sometimes, doesn't it? Women have had issues with rights and equality from the beginning of time. Things need to change on a global scale for horrible situations like this to stop occurring so frequently.

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WomanStats Maps

WomanStats Maps | Global education = global understanding | Scoop.it

"The WomanStats Project is the most comprehensive compilation of information on the status of women in the world. The Project facilitates understanding the linkage between the situation of women and the security of nation-states. We comb the extant literature and conduct expert interviews to find qualitative and quantitative information on over 310 indicators of women's status in 174 countries. Our Database expands daily, and access to it is free of charge.  Click here if you are a new to the project."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 30, 2013 7:48 PM
I have linked to the WomanStats Project in the past because their global datasets and maps are perfect for get students to explore a potential topic that might be of interest to them.  I'm resharing this now because they have recently updated their maps page to include 28 statistical measures to indicate the status of women around the world (including this one on the gendered discrepancy of access to secondary education).  The WomanStats Project provides important data and maps regarding issues of gender, access and equity with a spatial perspective.

Mary Rack's curator insight, March 31, 2013 7:44 AM

Amazing and thought-provoking. 

Daniel Landi's curator insight, April 1, 2013 2:08 AM

Topic link: Population and Change: Gender

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The State of Women in the World

The State of Women in the World | Global education = global understanding | Scoop.it

Tags: gender, development, worldwide, poverty.


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Lauren Jacquez's curator insight, February 12, 2013 1:39 PM

Gender Development index - CHapter 9 materials

Amy Marques's curator insight, July 2, 2013 11:09 AM

This is a great represenaton for showing the unfortunate truth of the state women in the world today.

Shelby Porter's curator insight, November 4, 2013 11:15 AM

Why are women so unequal to men? Why are women in the Middle East seeing such bad treatment and unequality? How can we fix these problems?

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U.S. Intelligence Says Water Shortages Threaten Stability

U.S. Intelligence Says Water Shortages Threaten Stability | Global education = global understanding | Scoop.it

"Competition for increasingly scarce water in the next decade will fuel instability in regions such as South Asia and the Middle East that are important to U.S. national security, according to a U.S. intelligence report."

 

Geographic thinking is about uncovering the spatial connections between issues that on the surface might not seem related.  Multinational river basins are a perfect example of environmental resources that demand international cooperation for successful management, and it regions of scarcity and population growth, it is easy to envision clashing viewpoints on how to fairly share such resources.

 

Discussion questions: What geographic themes are evident in this article? What geographic problems could exacerbate the problem? What could alleviate these issues in the future?


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Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 23, 2:22 PM

Water is a huge resources and obviously something that we use everyday and in the US take for granted because there are many countries suffereing from sortages such as this nation. Which of the following it is threatening not just the stability of the nation but the stability of the people and the society that make up that nation.

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Percentage of Population Living in Poverty

Percentage of Population Living in Poverty | Global education = global understanding | Scoop.it

This interactive map shows national estimates of the percentage of the population falling below the poverty line.  That is a quite problematic situate to map, since the operational definitions of poverty vary considerably among countries.  Also, there are some counties without data (Central Africa, North Korea, etc.)  However, there is still considerable value to be gleaned from this map.  What regional patterns do you notice?  How will this map inform our understanding of migration patterns and political unrest?


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Ishwer Singh's curator insight, January 20, 7:26 AM

This map show that most countries in Africa and south America are suffering from poverty. The country suffering from the highest amount of poverty is Chad. it has 80% of its people in poverty and countries around Chad also experience high amounts of poverty. Many articles state that the government there is corrupted. i too believe that the government is corrupted. i hope that the government helps the people and not themselves. People are dying every minute in areas like this due to famine. there are many children who are left to fend for themselves and are abandoned at the very young age as their families couldnt afford to fill another mouth. i believe all this can end if the government does something for the people. 

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Does democracy stifle economic growth?

TED Talks Economist Yasheng Huang compares China to India, and asks how China's authoritarian rule contributed to its astonishing economic growth -- leading to a big question: Is democracy actually holding India back?

 

This compelling TedTalk explores the links between economic development and governmental style, oversight and influence.  While the speaker mainly discusses politics and economics in the context of China and India, Pakistan, Russia, North and South Korea are all mentioned.      


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Matt Mallinson's comment, November 21, 2012 11:11 AM
Democracy can stifle economic growth. War will definitely stifle economic growth. North Korea doesn't look like they're going to stop fighting South Korea, if only they would combine their lands, they would probably be a much better nation as one.
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What the world eats -- a week's worth of groceries

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Jen-ai's curator insight, May 1, 2013 10:03 AM

!  This is so informative.  

Laurie Diamond's curator insight, May 3, 2013 9:03 AM

An interesting look and different cultures

Samuel Yeats's curator insight, May 8, 2013 12:40 AM

Q1) How does this slideshow depict the differing socioeconomic situations of countries around the world? (Use the example of at least 2 countries)

Q2) Do you think that the image of an Australian weekly diet is accurate to your own family and why?

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Japan's Geographic Challenge

Stratfor examines Japan's primary geographic challenge of sustaining its large population with little arable land and few natural resources. For more analysi...

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Kevin Cournoyer's comment, May 1, 2013 12:51 AM
Unlike other larger, more geographically diverse countries, Japan is faced with the problem of a general lack of farmable land and natural resources. The fact that the country is itself an island does not make things any easier for it in an economic sense. The way the country is divided up also makes for a difficult political situation, as mountain ranges create division, and therefore, political disunity.
The proximity of the Korean peninsula and China to Japan is also important to examine. Whenever Japan wishes to acquire natural resources and other economically beneficial materials, Korea is the conduit through which Japan tends to invade the mainland, usually China. Because of this, we can see how Japan’s geographic location may cause strained relationships with its neighbors, both politically and economically. Alienating two of its closest neighbors would clearly be a disastrous move for Japan, but it may be seen as necessary due to its unfortunate geographic location.
Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, November 27, 2013 5:31 PM

It would make sense to me that for a place like Japan to sustain itself successfully, it would have to have some help from other areas with more resources.  Again with the concept- people don't choose to be born, or where they are born... To be born in Japan is as unchosen by that person as it would be in any other country.  I don't think people should have to pay for resources that they do not have available, especially because they are on an island/island chain that simply doesn't have what they need.  I am really repulsed by the bartering system because of absolute indication of beyond excessive surplus and profit and greed and all that garbage that humanity reeks of.  Yeah some people are happy, but we could be completely unburdened of all negativity if we banded together to rid the world of negativity itself.  I know that Japan would be happy to receive everything that they need for no cost, but I also know that many people would be willing to work, and more willing to work, if they didn't have expenses to pay for... it would really be serving their life's purpose as a component of humankind if they worked to help others, rather than to pay their monthly rent.  I don't have a clue how I would go about organizing a movement to transform this idea into a reality, but I'll work on that.  In the mean time, I would advise supranationalism for Japan, and hope that with the alliance of other countries, they can band together and make deals that work for the greater good of their country, population, and the world.

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, April 10, 10:58 AM

This short video did a great job in explaining why Japan became expansionist in the decades leading up to WW II.  The mountainous nature of the islands and lack of arable land challenges Japan to provide food for its people.  To understand Japan you must understand her geography, this helps to understand why a country acted the way it did in the past and can be a predictor of future actions. 

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5 Ideas That Are Changing the World: The Case For Optimism

5 Ideas That Are Changing the World: The Case For Optimism | Global education = global understanding | Scoop.it
From technology to equality, five ways the world is getting better all the time...

 

This article by former President of the United States Bill Clinton, outlines numerous ways that globalization can improve the world, especially in developing regions.  He uses examples from around the world and includes numerous geographic themes. 

 

Technology-Phones mean freedom Health-Healthy communities prosper Economy-Green energy equals good business Equality-Women rule Justice-The fight for the future is now

 

Tags: technology, medical, economic, gender, class, globalization, development, worldwide.   


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Percentage of Population Living in Poverty

Percentage of Population Living in Poverty | Global education = global understanding | Scoop.it

This interactive map shows national estimates of the percentage of the population falling below the poverty line.  That is a quite problematic situate to map, since the operational definitions of poverty vary considerably among countries.  Also, there are some counties without data (Central Africa, North Korea, etc.)  However, there is still considerable value to be gleaned from this map.  What regional patterns do you notice?  How will this map inform our understanding of migration patterns and political unrest?


Via Seth Dixon
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Ishwer Singh's curator insight, January 20, 7:26 AM

This map show that most countries in Africa and south America are suffering from poverty. The country suffering from the highest amount of poverty is Chad. it has 80% of its people in poverty and countries around Chad also experience high amounts of poverty. Many articles state that the government there is corrupted. i too believe that the government is corrupted. i hope that the government helps the people and not themselves. People are dying every minute in areas like this due to famine. there are many children who are left to fend for themselves and are abandoned at the very young age as their families couldnt afford to fill another mouth. i believe all this can end if the government does something for the people. 

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Solar power cheaper than fossil fuels for 1.3 billion people

Solar power cheaper than fossil fuels for 1.3 billion people | Global education = global understanding | Scoop.it

"Here in the U.S., we're used to thinking about solar power as one of those happy eco-friendly things that we'd all totally be using except for the fact that it's so much more expensive than fossil fuels. In the developing world, though, it's exactly the opposite: solar power is gaining ground with 1.3 billion people simply because it's the cheapest way to go." 

 

Geographic thinking begins with erasing some old assumptions.  Just because something is true in a given time and place, does not make it true in all times and in all places. 


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Jen Smith's comment, January 30, 2012 2:25 PM
With huge successes with solar power like this in Africa, the poorest continent in the world, it makes me really honestly wonder what is taking the United States so long to at least -try- to implement some sort of energy solution such as this. Relying on fossil fuel forever is just not feasible.