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Nogales, Mexico: A Few Steps, and a Whole World Away

Nogales, Mexico: A Few Steps, and a Whole World Away | Global education = global understanding | Scoop.it
A writer who has crossed many borders finds the one between Nogales, Ariz., and Mexico to be the oddest frontier of all.

 

Given that most of the articles concerning the border these days reflect on the policing of the border, the illegal flow of people, drugs or guns across the border, or the violence in the borderlands, this is refreshing change of pace.  Paul Theroux focused on the cultural connections that form, not in spite of the border, but because of the border and the cultural vibrance of Nogales, Sonora. 


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Sheyna Vargas's comment, September 19, 2012 1:21 PM
Everyone is always talking and writing about Mexicans crossing the border, taking jobs, and smuggling drugs into the US. It’s nice to find an article showing their humility and kindness to others. These people in this town just over the border are trying to improve it by adding security, school programs, and keeping their town clean.

I think there’s so much that can be learned from this article. As Theroux states, “the neighborhoods just across the fence are not representative of the town at large, which is a lesson in how to know another country: stay longer, travel deeper, overcome timidity.” So, while, yes, there are dangerous areas in Mexico, not every town is the same. Not all Mexicans are dangerous drug dealers who want to steal your job.
Jessica Martel's curator insight, February 7, 2013 5:45 PM

cool

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Zetas Mexico's 'biggest cartel'

Zetas Mexico's 'biggest cartel' | Global education = global understanding | Scoop.it
The Zetas are now the largest cartel in Mexico, overtaking their bitter rival, the Sinaloa cartel, a report by US security firm Stratfor suggests. 

 

When the Sinaloa cartel was the 'big dog,' they had a tacit understanding with the government and the government would target other drug syndicates and basically leave the important members of 'La Federacion' alone.  The Sinaloans operate primarily through bribery and corruption while the Zetas specialize in horrific brutality.  Now that the Zetas have muscled their way into more turf and more influential networks, how will that reshape the geopolitical paradigm?  What with the effect be for Mexican citizens and for those on both sides of the border?   This is not a good turn of events.


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James Hobson's curator insight, September 23, 2014 12:21 PM

(Mexico topic 5)

It seems to me that as Mexico's economy evolves, so do its drug cartels. Just as businesses expand and take monopoly over smaller ones, it looks like the same process is occurring with cartels. My educated guess would be that this is not just a coincidence, but rather the two are strongly correlated and interconnected. Though I  am not an expect on the topic and there is surely much to be researched, I believe that advances in infrastructure such as the Internet, telecom, and freeways (to name just a few) benefit both the legal economy and illegal cartels by being utilized and exploited in the same manner.

Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, March 1, 2015 7:16 PM

I've often wondered why the government can't get things under control in Mexico.  These cartels are awful!  Mexico will never get better till the Zetas are put out of operation.  Its also come down to supply and demand.  Until we stop demanding drugs then I guess they will keep supplying them to the US.  Legalizing pot has to put some sort of crimp into the supply/demand of it in the US.  I wonder what the dollar amount is?  The news out of Mexico about the brutality of the cartels scares me into not visiting Mexico.  It has to have some impact on tourism.  

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 6, 2015 6:14 PM

After reading the article and learning that just one cartel alone runs in more than half of Mexico is astounding. For one cartel to place it's mark like that must mean something bad in this case. They also seem to be much more brutal because the article says that violence gives them advantage over a rival gang Sinaloa who uses bribery. That is probably how they gained so much advantage over others. They probably get their violence because they are mostly ex- spec ops soldiers. With expansion into South America, middlemen are eliminated, which in turn makes more profit for the two prominent cartels. Also, because of our stepping up on border enforcement, the cartels have expanded to overseas where the market is more open.