Global education = global understanding
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Betting on llamas in Bolivia

In Bolivia llama prices are up and demand for shawls and scarves made from alpaca fibre is increasing. But how do smallholder farmers capitalise on these optimal market conditions?

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Tajik Remittances From Russia up 30%

Tajik Remittances From Russia up 30% | Global education = global understanding | Scoop.it
Tajik migrants working in Russia sent to $2.96 billion in remittances to their families in Tajikistan in 2011, over 30 percent more than the previous year, National Bank Deputy Chairman Malokhat Kholikzoda said on Thursday.

 

The higher the national dependence on remittances, the worse off the country is essentially at being economically independent and viable. 


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cookiesrgreat's comment, March 13, 2012 9:10 AM
Ots hard to imagine how Tajikistan can survive with their work force living otside the country
Derek Ethier's comment, October 18, 2012 1:23 AM
Tajikstan's plight symbolizes the problems most former Soviet Republics face in a post Soviet world. Almost all of these nations have an enormous reliance upon Russia in their day to day activities. As this article states, over $2.96 billion have been sent to Tajikstan from Tajiks working in Russia. Tajikstan's economy is going to tank if it's citizens continue to be so reliant on Russia.
Elizabeth Allen's comment, December 6, 2012 11:03 PM
Yes the remittance work will hurt Tajikstan's chances of economic success. But, the workers have to provide for their families. The workers need to self-preserve, with that in mind, it is natural for them not be concerned about their home country's economics.
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A Keyhole into Burma

A Keyhole into Burma | Global education = global understanding | Scoop.it
On my last afternoon in Bagan, I went in search of a meal that would serve as both lunch and dinner, before boarding my flight...

 

As a notoriously closed society, glimpses into Burma become all the more important as Burma shows signs of  (possibly) opening up politically for the first time in decades.


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Cam E's curator insight, April 8, 2014 12:23 PM

Yet another collection of pictures I'm scooping, but this time there's over 100 of them! Getting a western view into the insulated society of Burma is a rare opportunity, this shows some interesting pastimes such as Water buffalo surfing, but also things of major cultural significance, such as the importance of Buddhism.

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 23, 2014 4:41 PM

This article depicts the differences and the little things that we in the USA take for granted for instance in this case it is a cd that is known as the "Western" type of misc and mass media culture that has been transported in this Burmese society.  It truly is the little things such as the Robbie Williams CD that is being depicted as not only the Western musical society but also being grouped with Bob Marley songs that would depict from the Burmese translation the Western society. And even though the people in this society don't know what the lyrics mean they can still be moved by the melody.  

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, December 15, 2014 10:51 PM

I found the fact that the government of Burma banned certain music, it seems like an odd thing to refuse the people of the country, but we forget that it is the small things that we take for granted in the US, that are seen as luxuries in other parts of the world and that is an interesting idea to wrap your mind around.

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Haiti dreams of tourism revival

Haiti dreams of tourism revival | Global education = global understanding | Scoop.it
A few Haitian officials and Donna Karan are plotting one earthquake-rattled city’s transformation.

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The Difference between the United Kingdom, Great Britain and England Explained


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Al Picozzi's curator insight, October 7, 2013 12:10 AM

A great and entertaining way to explain this part of Europe.  I know I have in the past used the terms England, Great Britain and the United Kingdom to all refer to the same thing. It was also amazing to see that people are the same everywhere in that the people in Wales do not consider themselves British, much the same way the people in Sicily consider themselves Sicilain and not Italian. 

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 8, 2014 12:09 PM

As an outsider looking in the concept of the United Kingdom is a little confusing. We are taught to view Scotland as its own country, but they are countries within a larger structure. This video makes what would confuse many Americans and condenses it into a clear video that is just about 5 mins.

Kaitlin Young's curator insight, December 12, 2014 4:38 PM

Many people often interchange the UK, Great Britain, and England, but in reality, they all describe different different things. The UK is a country of four countries, each with equal power, including Scotland, Northern Ireland, England, and Wales but they are all considered British citizens.UK is a political term, describing a country. Great Britain is a physical geographical term describing the land mass containing Scotland, Wales, and England.  The British Isles refers to both Great Britain and the Island of Ireland. All of these terms describe different things, being characterized by either political affiliation or geographic characteristics. 

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Inca Girl, Frozen for 500 Years, Now On Display : Kim MacQuarrie’s Peru & South America Blog

Inca Girl, Frozen for 500 Years, Now On Display : Kim MacQuarrie’s Peru & South America Blog | Global education = global understanding | Scoop.it

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People Under 35 Have Never Seen Normal Global Temperatures

People Under 35 Have Never Seen Normal Global Temperatures | Global education = global understanding | Scoop.it
“If you’re younger than 26, you have never seen a month where the global mean was as cold as the 161 year average,” observes Robert Grumbine.

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Syria assault enters fourth day

Syria assault enters fourth day | Global education = global understanding | Scoop.it
An assault by the Syrian army on the restive city of Homs enters its fourth day as Russia's foreign minister is due in Damascus for talks.
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Carpathian Melodies

Andrei Pidkivka on folk flutes from the Carpathian Mountains in Ukraine. Solomiya Gorokhivska on violin.
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World News - Britain, France hit by new snow as Europe freeze ...

World News - Britain, France hit by new snow as Europe freeze ... | Global education = global understanding | Scoop.it
Bitterly cold weather sweeping across Europe claimed more victims on Sunday and brought widespread disruption to transport services, with warnings that the chilling temperatures would remain into next week.
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Imran Khan Warns Afghanistan Could Slip Into Civil War When Nato Forces Leave | World News | Sky News

Imran Khan Warns Afghanistan Could Slip Into Civil War When Nato Forces Leave | World News | Sky News | Global education = global understanding | Scoop.it
Imran Khan, the former Pakistan cricket captain turned politician, says he fears Afghanistan could slide into civil war once Nato forces leave for good.
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European chill moves west, 122 die in Ukraine | Top News | Reuters

KIEV (Reuters) - Bitterly cold weather that has claimed hundreds of lives in eastern Europe swept westwards over the continent on Saturday, blanketing Rome's Colosseum with snow for the first time in three...
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A new banana species?

A new banana species? | Global education = global understanding | Scoop.it

The announcement of Musa serpentina as a new species of banana sparks a discussion on its true identity.


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Drought led to demise of ancient city of Angkor

Drought led to demise of ancient city of Angkor | Global education = global understanding | Scoop.it
The ancient city of Angkor — the most famous monument of which is the breathtaking ruined temple of Angkor Wat — might have collapsed due to valiant but ultimately failed efforts to battle drought, scientists find.

 

Why do societies collapse?  Often they are overextended, consume too many resources for their hinterland network to supply or they aren't able to adapt to changes to the system.  Angkor Wat, the largest urban complex of the pre-industrial world, collapsed primarily due to drought conditions and a changing ecology.  Without sufficient water resources, the network collapsed.  What other environment 'collapses' can you think of?   


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Cam E's curator insight, April 8, 2014 12:29 PM

It's easy to forget that for most of history, even the greatest of empires were subject to the whims of the climate. The ability to survive in places where humans really shouldn't thrive is only a recent development thanks to technology, but a drought is something the mightiest army can't fight, and all the wealth in the world will not stop, without the right technology.

James Hobson's curator insight, December 4, 2014 9:12 PM

(Southeast Asia topic 10 [independent topic 2])

Naturally, that which fails to adapt to its environment will not survive. Such was the likely fate of Angkor. But was this early industrial area the cause of its own drought demise? I'll answer this question with another modern one: Are booming metropolises of today having an impact on their environment? Look at the American Southwest, where the booming populations of Las Vegas and Phoenix, and the water use that goes along with it, are slowly sucking dry Lake Mead. Though in both cases the climate is becoming drier itself, adaptations could be the remedy. Just as the inhabitants of Easter Island caused their own demise as well, it truly pays to learn from the past and take proactive precautions to prevent such worse-case scenarios. Luckily today there is knowledge to do such that, and now the issue goes to getting that message acknowledged and acted upon.

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 15, 2014 2:37 PM

This reminds me of the theories as to why Easter Island fell. Although what many people know of Easter Island is the giant heads, there was once a flourishing civilization in the area but many scholars theorize that they deforested the island to a point that they ran out of resources and had to flee to survive.

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Pakistan Trees Cocooned in Spider Webs

Pakistan Trees Cocooned in Spider Webs | Global education = global understanding | Scoop.it
Documented by an aid worker, millions of spiders took to the trees to spin their webs after heavy floods inundated Pakistan in 2010.

 

Besides being an aesthetic wonder, this image is a great way to start a discussion about so many distinct issues.  The floods of 2010 devasted the human population, killing over 2,000.  These same floods also altered the ecosystem as spiders have needed to adapted to their new inundated landscape as well.  For the human population, this has had the shocking benefit of lowering the incidents of malaria since the spiders have more effectively limited the mosquito population.  Interconnections...geographic information is a spiderweb of interconnections between nature and humanity.     


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Kaitlin Young's curator insight, December 12, 2014 2:29 PM

Intense flooding occurring in December 2010 left 2,000 people dead in Pakistan. The flood waters left both the people, and the insects, with no where to go. Spiders, trying to escape from the flood waters, climbed into trees and bushes in order to avoid drowning. Almost every type of vegetation was covered in webs, making the landscape appear as though it was planed in cotton candy trees. While definitely peculiar, the massive amounts of spider webbing averted a mosquito crisis. While something positive did come from this occurrence, most of the trees were killed since their leaves were smothered by the webbing and unable to collect sunlight. Now the landscape contains little to know shade for the people living their. 

 

When observing geographies, it is important to understand not just the people, but the other organisms that affect a place, and how they too can make an effect. 

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 16, 2014 8:19 AM

These floods damaged the ecosystems in Pakistan. It also manipulated the natural order of things. With he heavy floods lots of mosquito were attracted by the water and then millions of spiders followed for food. What resulted are these remarkable images. For those who suffer from arachnophobia this may their worst nightmare but it has an odd beauty to it.

Matt Ramsdell's curator insight, December 14, 2015 2:37 PM

After floods devastated Pakistan many of the animals and people had to adapt to some new surroundings. Spiders took to the trees and made webs of massive size. The spiders created a better environment because not only were the spiders eating the mosqitos and the bugs but they were also eating the disease malaria contributing to a more healthy and stable environment.

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Agriculture and climate change in India

Agriculture and climate change in India | Global education = global understanding | Scoop.it

We stress the importance of germplasm. Wild and extant varieties have traits tolerant to high temperature, elevated CO2 etc. These might have been discarded in the past due to low yield potential but can be made use of today as parents for the breeding of tolerant varieties to climate change. There is a need to revisit gene banks with a view to searching for unique traits required for climate change. In this search, indigenous knowledge and farmer’s wisdom have immense value.


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Cam E's curator insight, April 1, 2014 11:10 AM

I really like the idea behind India's innovation to combat climate change. They're looking to the past and using the more ancient techniques and knowledge which has existed on the Earth in the past, rather than creating an entirely new species of crop which we would not know the long-term effect of.

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World Maps - geography online games

World Maps - geography online games | Global education = global understanding | Scoop.it
World geography quizzes galore - over 250 fun online map games teach capitals, country locations, and more. Also info on the culture, history, and much more.

 

A good way to practice for the map quizzes.


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Do the dead outnumber the living?

Do the dead outnumber the living? | Global education = global understanding | Scoop.it
The population of the planet reached seven billion in October last year, according to the United Nations. But what's the figure for all those who have lived before us?

 


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Seth Dixon's comment, February 6, 2012 8:52 PM
Very short answer: no. Yet, how many people have lived in human history? What are the estimates? This article is worth exploring to not at other population issues and debates.
Em Marin's comment, February 7, 2012 11:09 AM
wow... it is so mind boggling just thinking about how I am just one person, amongst billions, and billions more that have since passed. It certainly makes me question my existance and significance or lack there of...
melissa Marin's comment, February 7, 2012 11:10 AM
wow... it is so mind boggling just thinking about how I am just one person, amongst billions, and billions more that have since passed. It certainly makes me question my existance and significance or lack there of...
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Apple manufacturing plant workers complain of long hours, militant culture - CNN.com

Apple manufacturing plant workers complain of long hours, militant culture - CNN.com | Global education = global understanding | Scoop.it
Miss Chen stares curiously at the iPad. Even though she works overtime in a factory in southwestern China that manufactures them, she's never seen the finished product.
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Odessa Philharmonic Orchestra at the 20th Anniversary Concert of U.S.-Ukrainian Relations.mp4

Ukraine's Odessa Philharmonic Orchestra under their dynamic American chief, Hobart Earle performing at the concert organized by the. U.S. Embassy Kyiv to mar...
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Global competency still an issue at universities | USA TODAY College

Global competency still an issue at universities | USA TODAY College | Global education = global understanding | Scoop.it
Despite technology bringing worlds together, many students lack basic knowledge of international affairs.
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Romania PM Boc resigns after protests

Romania PM Boc resigns after protests | Global education = global understanding | Scoop.it
BUCHAREST (Reuters) - Romania's Prime Minister Emil Boc resigned on Monday after weeks of nationwide protests against his tough austerity measures and before a parliamentary election due late this year.It (Romania PM Boc resigns after protests
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Famine ends in Somalia, as drought looms in West Africa

Famine ends in Somalia, as drought looms in West Africa | Global education = global understanding | Scoop.it
Aid groups say that improved harvests and food donations have ended risk of starvation, but warn that ongoing war in Somalia could still reverse gains made.
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