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Bolivia: A Country With No McDonald’s

Bolivia: A Country With No McDonald’s | Global education = global understanding | Scoop.it
What America can learn from one of the most sustainable food nations on Earth.

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Jess Deady's curator insight, February 20, 3:27 PM

McDonalds is a social and economical chain restaurant that has not made its way to Bolivia. Sure, they like hamburgers but they prefer to get them from the women hawking them on the streets. Who can blame them? When is the last time you bought something that was made in America? Probably a couple weeks or months even. Cultural traditions are fading out fast and moves like this are what will keep Bolivians culturally enabled.

Paige Therien's curator insight, March 1, 1:21 PM

There is much valuable information to learn from other countries and cultures, especially when it comes to food because subsistence greatly shapes a culture.  Of course, the United States is very different than Bolivia in terms of culture and geography, but there is a lot to take away from the structural rejection of McDonalds in Bolivia.  Bolivia has taken advantage of the altitudinal zonation that is characteristic of their mountainous country; they have formed a system of reciprocity which fosters strong community and leaves no room for giant food corporations such as McDonald.  If people in the United States want a change in their food systems, the first step is rejecting the systems that should not play a role, but currently do.  Institutions like McDonalds have allowed people to be so far removed from their food sources, and ultimately, an important characteristic unique to humanity (food producers).

Amy Marques's curator insight, April 24, 6:41 AM

       It's interesting that globalization is one of the reasons for the growth of fast food chains like McDonald’s around the world. It’s hard for countries to turn down a food company who really does configure their menu to the consumers their serving. I find it interesting that Bolivia found a way to resist this. Its topography is what made the last store close in 2002. McDonald’s couldn’t survive in the mountainous country with the Andes and the Amazon. They were able to resist because the nation always prioritized local control of its food system and eating healthy. Its people value food, food producers, and their ecosystems

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Catholic Demographics

Catholic Demographics | Global education = global understanding | Scoop.it
Infographics showing the distribution of the Roman Catholic population in the world, where it has risen and fallen in recent years.

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Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, February 11, 9:29 AM

As the Roman Catholic population decreases in Europe, it drastically increases in Africa. However, Latin America still holds the largest population of Catholics according to the Vatican.

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, February 28, 7:33 PM

This infographic shows the changing world Catholic demographic. South America is home to by far the largest Catholic population in the world where once Europe was. Now Europe has a rapidly declining Catholic population over the past 40 years (probably due to declining religiosity and low birth rates) while Africa, particularly in DR Congo, is seeing the most rapid increase in Catholics (likely due to missionaries and converts). Interestingly, there's a growing number of Catholics in Asia, possibly due to missionaries or just migration.

Lona Pradeep Parad's curator insight, May 27, 4:37 PM

This is a distribution map, showing how Catholicism is spread throughout the world. It is a choropleth map and a bar graph on the side.

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Religious architecture of Islam

Religious architecture of Islam | Global education = global understanding | Scoop.it
Read Religious architecture of Islam for travel tips, advice, news and articles from all around the world by Lonely Planet...

 

This is an excellent article that can be used in a thematic class for analyzing religion, the human landscape, the urban environment and cultural iconography.  For a regional geography class, this show great images from Indonesia, Spain, Egypt, Syria and Israel/Palestine.  


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Quran Coaching's curator insight, August 4, 12:03 PM

The Quran-Coaching is the best platform for the quran learning by taking online quran classes.
www.qurancoaching.com

Quran Coaching's curator insight, August 12, 11:14 AM

The Quran-Coaching is the best platform for the quran learning by taking online quran classes.
http://goo.gl/st4aLZ
Like/Share/Comment.
#quran #onlineQuran #islam #Tajweed

Quran Coaching's curator insight, August 21, 11:10 AM

The Quran-Coaching is the best platform for the quran learning by taking online quran classes.
http://goo.gl/st4aLZ
Like/Share/Comment.
#quran #onlineQuran #islam #Tajweed

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Nogales, Mexico: A Few Steps, and a Whole World Away

Nogales, Mexico: A Few Steps, and a Whole World Away | Global education = global understanding | Scoop.it
A writer who has crossed many borders finds the one between Nogales, Ariz., and Mexico to be the oddest frontier of all.

 

Given that most of the articles concerning the border these days reflect on the policing of the border, the illegal flow of people, drugs or guns across the border, or the violence in the borderlands, this is refreshing change of pace.  Paul Theroux focused on the cultural connections that form, not in spite of the border, but because of the border and the cultural vibrance of Nogales, Sonora. 


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Sheyna Vargas's comment, September 19, 2012 10:21 AM
Everyone is always talking and writing about Mexicans crossing the border, taking jobs, and smuggling drugs into the US. It’s nice to find an article showing their humility and kindness to others. These people in this town just over the border are trying to improve it by adding security, school programs, and keeping their town clean.

I think there’s so much that can be learned from this article. As Theroux states, “the neighborhoods just across the fence are not representative of the town at large, which is a lesson in how to know another country: stay longer, travel deeper, overcome timidity.” So, while, yes, there are dangerous areas in Mexico, not every town is the same. Not all Mexicans are dangerous drug dealers who want to steal your job.
Jessica Martel's curator insight, February 7, 2013 2:45 PM

cool

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"I Love you" in 100 Languages

100 ways to say 'I love you' from places all around the world.  Happy Valentine's Day!  What is culturally specific about this holiday?  What aspects of this holiday are seen in all cultures around the world?


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Melissa Marin's comment, February 16, 2012 4:15 PM
I think most cultures probably celebrate some sort of valentine's day. Colombia for instance celebrates "el dia del amor y la amistad" - this is our equivalent to valentine's day and is celebrated in a different month
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Born in the USA, Made in France

Born in the USA, Made in France | Global education = global understanding | Scoop.it
Born in the USA, Made in France: How McDonald's Succeeds in the Land of Michelin Stars by Knowledge@Wharton, the online business journal of the Wharton School.

 

While many portray McDonald's as the embodiment of all that is wrong with globalization, the diffusion of McDonald's is not a simple replication of the American fast food chain and exporting it elsewhere...a lot of local adaptations on a global model is part of McDonald's successful economic model.   Although I'm not a fan of the word "glocalization" to describe how local flavor adds spice to globalized phenomenon, it most certainly fits here.   


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WomanStats Maps

WomanStats Maps | Global education = global understanding | Scoop.it

"The WomanStats Project is the most comprehensive compilation of information on the status of women in the world. The Project facilitates understanding the linkage between the situation of women and the security of nation-states. We comb the extant literature and conduct expert interviews to find qualitative and quantitative information on over 310 indicators of women's status in 174 countries. Our Database expands daily, and access to it is free of charge.  Click here if you are a new to the project."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 30, 2013 4:48 PM
I have linked to the WomanStats Project in the past because their global datasets and maps are perfect for get students to explore a potential topic that might be of interest to them.  I'm resharing this now because they have recently updated their maps page to include 28 statistical measures to indicate the status of women around the world (including this one on the gendered discrepancy of access to secondary education).  The WomanStats Project provides important data and maps regarding issues of gender, access and equity with a spatial perspective.

Mary Rack's curator insight, March 31, 2013 4:44 AM

Amazing and thought-provoking. 

Daniel Landi's curator insight, March 31, 2013 11:08 PM

Topic link: Population and Change: Gender

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Not all Olympic champions stand on the podium

Not all Olympic champions stand on the podium | Global education = global understanding | Scoop.it
Tahmina Kohistani’s Olympics lasted exactly 14 and 42/100ths of a second.

 

This is a great article that highlights the Olympic successes that are underreported.  Due to geographic circumstances, simply competing is a remarkable accomplishment.  The women participants from Afghanistan and Iran are highlighted in this article. 


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lelapin's comment, August 11, 2012 10:27 AM
great article indeed. Thanks for turning the spotlight away from the podium, for a change.
Meagan Harpin's curator insight, October 2, 2013 9:41 AM

The olympic games have become only about the podium winners in the media, if you dont win you dont matter. Tahmina Kohistani was the only female athlete from Afghanistan to compete in the games back in 2012. It is an amazing feat in itself that a female from Afghanistan even managed to get to the games never mind partacipate. She didnt win, she finished last, but it was her personal best time and the fastest she had ever run the 100 meter. But because she was not up on that podium none of that matter and many people did not even know she had run the race.  

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Currywurst on the Street

Currywurst on the Street | Global education = global understanding | Scoop.it
Michael Slackman, The Times's Berlin Bureau Chief, looks into the city's obsession with a popular street dish that combines sausage, ketchup and curry powder. 

 

The globalization of food, immigration and the diffusion of cultural practices are all richly displayed in this short clip. 


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Shelby Porter's curator insight, September 26, 2013 6:36 AM

The globalization of food is becoming more apparent in todays culture than ever before. More and more restaurants from different parts of the world are showing up and alot of the food we as Americans are familar with are taking on some new ethnic influences. The currywurst is a great example of one country's culinary favorite around the time of WWII and enhancing it with an American and Indian by way of London flavor. And now it is one of the most popular treats someone can buy while in Germany. Many of our cultures foods are being influenced by others now and flavors are beginning to mix as well as our idea of where foods come from. The diffusion of cultural practices as well as the globalization of food will only grow stronger as time goes on, and so will our taste for a new culinary delight. 

Liam Michelsohn's curator insight, November 6, 2013 11:20 AM

Ahhh the currywurst on the street, well i thought this was great very informitive cultural video. The speical dish that is made and served among the streets in germany and all over,  it is thought to be a very weird and almost un appitizing meal to some one like my self.  However those food are very popular and prominate in there culture, just like certian foods, hotdog stands, flaffel carts and other foods that we enjoy have be come common in our culture. However I dont see currywurst hitting the streets of NYC any time soon.

Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, November 29, 2013 9:23 AM

The Currywurst sounds good but it seems that it will upset my stomach. I have a feeling it would. But it seems to be a hit were it is sold because that is what most people eat when they are on the streets burlin.

 

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Globalizing the Local, Localizing the Global

Sheikha Al Mayassa, a patron of artists, storytellers and filmmakers in Qatar, talks about how art and culture create a country's identity -- and allow every country to share its unique identity with the wider world.

 

Oftentimes, we in the more developed world seek to change cultural practices and institutions in the developing world. This talk speaks to the importance of locally based agents for cultural change, specifically within the context of the Middle East. While we might wish to see what many perceive as universal rights spread throughout the world, the local cultural geographies must be taken into consideration into how to carry out any initiative that seeks to change local institutions.


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Katharine Norman's curator insight, September 14, 2013 10:19 PM

Sheikha provides an amazing talk that leaves no one denying that culture is the underlying thread that ties us all together.

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60 minutes: India's love affair with gold

60 minutes: India's love affair with gold | Global education = global understanding | Scoop.it
60 Minutes on CBS News: India's love affair with gold - "No gold, no wedding," is a saying in India, indicating the importance of gold to Indian culture and tradition. Byron Pitts reports on India's obsession with gold.

 

Cultural values strongly impact consumption patterns.  India's preference for gold, combined with South Asia's growing population, also leads to environmental impacts around the world as India's obsession for gold drives the global market, accounting for 1/3 of the trade.  This video explores the cultural (and economic) logic behind the enormous importance of gold jewelry in Indian society.      


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