Global education = global understanding
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Rescooped by Karen Kelly from Geography Education
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Missing Girls...

"In India, China and many other parts of the world today, girls are killed, aborted and abandoned simply because they are girls. The United Nations estimates as many as 200 million girls are missing in the world today because of this so-called 'gendercide' or femicide."


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Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 9:10 PM

Females might be the underdogs of men forever. Hopefully this is not the case but it just seems like it will be sometimes, doesn't it? Women have had issues with rights and equality from the beginning of time. Things need to change on a global scale for horrible situations like this to stop occurring so frequently.

Sreya Ayinala's curator insight, December 2, 2014 9:52 PM

Unit 3 Cultural Processes and Patterns

Amanda Morgan's curator insight, December 15, 2014 3:45 PM

This femicide is extremely disappointing.  Genocide is expected in third world, war torn countries.  The fact that it's 2014 and female babies are murdered for being girls, and parents are scared for their  children's lives, show how much power the government has over the people's lives. It is sad to think the government has the power to dictate how many children families can have and what gender.  On the flip side, these are countries that are extremely overpopulated.  The one child policy in China is what China is currently using (along with this femicide) as population control.  This is an important issue because there needs to be some sort of population control, but to what extent? This is taking away someone's basic human right - to procreate. Parents do not have control over what gender they produce and if they produce a female, their child may be taken and murdered from them. The state takes away what you created, your offspring and there is nothing they can do about it. 

Rescooped by Karen Kelly from Geography Education
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Does democracy stifle economic growth?

TED Talks Economist Yasheng Huang compares China to India, and asks how China's authoritarian rule contributed to its astonishing economic growth -- leading to a big question: Is democracy actually holding India back?

 

This compelling TedTalk explores the links between economic development and governmental style, oversight and influence.  While the speaker mainly discusses politics and economics in the context of China and India, Pakistan, Russia, North and South Korea are all mentioned.      


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Matt Mallinson's comment, November 21, 2012 11:11 AM
Democracy can stifle economic growth. War will definitely stifle economic growth. North Korea doesn't look like they're going to stop fighting South Korea, if only they would combine their lands, they would probably be a much better nation as one.
Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 15, 2014 2:17 PM

For Americans the idea that democracy can be anything but sunshine and rainbows is a hard pill to swallow. There is evidence that supports the contrary. Although democracy has the moral high ground, authoritative governments can grow at a faster rate because it does not have to address resistance where democracy fosters debate and dissent. In India, millions of people will not agree on everything and therefore progress can be slow going. 

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60 minutes: India's love affair with gold

60 minutes: India's love affair with gold | Global education = global understanding | Scoop.it
60 Minutes on CBS News: India's love affair with gold - "No gold, no wedding," is a saying in India, indicating the importance of gold to Indian culture and tradition. Byron Pitts reports on India's obsession with gold.

 

Cultural values strongly impact consumption patterns.  India's preference for gold, combined with South Asia's growing population, also leads to environmental impacts around the world as India's obsession for gold drives the global market, accounting for 1/3 of the trade.  This video explores the cultural (and economic) logic behind the enormous importance of gold jewelry in Indian society.      


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