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What is the Flipped Classroom?

Presentation slides for virtual presentations about the flipped classroom-the full picture


Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge, Seth Dixon
Denise Patrylo-Murray's insight:

We use this at Hunterdon Central

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Siew Leng Lim's curator insight, September 2, 2013 4:32 AM

The bottom half - outside class resources and homework-based activities

The top half - in class sharing from experts and with experts, authentic work done usually in team or in collaboration with peers &/or expert; students to consolidate and sythesize their learning through presentation

roberto gilli's curator insight, September 6, 2013 9:54 AM

In the "Concept Exploration" phase of the flipped classroom it woud be nice to have a conversational agent to help students. A sort of Virtual Tutor.

roberto gilli's comment, September 6, 2013 10:43 AM
In the "Concept Exploration" phase of the flipped classroom it woud be nice to have a conversational agent to help students. A sort of Virtual Tutor.

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In Burma (Myanmar), China's Scramble for Energy Threatens Livelihoods of Villagers

In Burma (Myanmar), China's Scramble for Energy Threatens Livelihoods of Villagers | Global Education | Scoop.it
In western Myanmar a Chinese-backed energy and trading hub is taking shape on a remote island.

 

Tags: Burma, Southeast Asia, energy.


Via Seth Dixon
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Kaitlin Young's curator insight, December 12, 2014 2:15 PM

Foreign interests in a less developed country can often lead to direct pressure on the local peoples. China's interest in Myanmar's oil and copper resources as well as their hydroelectric potential have left many local people feeling as though they are the victims of land grabs. While large Chinese corporations are making large profits, the locals are left with almost no incentive. The age old tradition of family owned and operated oil wells is being undermined, leaving people with no other options to make an income. Many of these large companies are backed by corrupt politicians and are government sponsored, but the ambiguity of these corporations allow for these people to hide their involvement. Myanmar's fear of China is leading it to seek ties with the United States and Europe and recently Myanmar has stopped construction on a dam that would allocate 90% of its energy production to China. The monopolization of less developed countries by larger more powerful countries such as China will always lead to social and economic disparities, thus resulting in conflict., 

Alec Castagno's curator insight, December 17, 2014 4:03 PM

As China grows and requires energy and oil, it is pushing into neighboring regions looking for more options. In Myanmar the mismanagement by the government has allowed the top members of society to profit at the expense of the majority of people, and are now being pushed to be more open about business dealings. China has provided most of the countries foreign investment, but Myanmar is now looking to get other investors to avoid falling too far under Chinas' wing. 

Wilmine Merlain's curator insight, December 17, 2014 5:29 PM

With China making use of all its natural resources, I question how long will they last before running out of their resources and having to rely on other countries to supply them with something as basic as energy. Though I am overjoyed at the recent decline in gas prices, I am also concerned at what price countries such as China are selling their natural resources. Often times, it is the people living in villages that tend to pay for these consequences. It is from them that these resources are being extracted from and being massed produce to meet the needs of other countries. Before committing to projects that will meet the needs of other countries, they need to start making their people their number one priority.

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Welcome to 'Geography Education'

Welcome to 'Geography Education' | Global Education | Scoop.it

Finding Materials: This site is designed for geography students and teachers to find interesting, current supplemental materials.  To search for place-specific posts, browse this interactive map.  To search for thematic posts organized by the APHG curriculum, see http://geographyeducation.org/thematic/. ; Also you can search for a keyword by clicking on the filter tab (looks like a funnel)  above in the upper-righthand corner.


Via Seth Dixon
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Helen Rowling's curator insight, September 28, 2014 6:30 PM

Use updates to filter through and be collated in your most frequented tools.

Rich Schultz's curator insight, November 18, 2014 2:10 PM

Geography and current events

Olivier Tabary's curator insight, November 28, 2014 12:06 PM

Many interesting tools to practice and to discover

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Rubrics in Moodle 2.2 - VivaeLearning: The Best Free Video Tutorials Online

Rubrics in Moodle 2.2  - VivaeLearning: The Best Free Video Tutorials Online | Global Education | Scoop.it
A first (and very brief) look at rubrics or marking criteria in Moodle 2.2 -to be available in December 2011

Via Dennis T OConnor, Denise Patrylo-Murray
Denise Patrylo-Murray's insight:

Share with PLC

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Dennis T OConnor's curator insight, September 13, 2014 3:26 PM

This short (4 1/2 minute) video gives you a clear understanding of the Moodle rubric tool. You are lead through creating and using the rubric and see results from both the instructor and student point of view. 



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Ukraine's Geographic Challenge

"Ukraine is the quintessential borderland state. The country borders three former Soviet states and four countries in the European Union.  Ukraine sits on the Northern European Plain, the area that has historically served as an invasion superhighway going east and west."

 

Tags: Ukraine, geopolitics, political.


Via Seth Dixon
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In 1492, Columbus sailed the ocean blue ... and slaughtered the indigenous ... - The Guardian

In 1492, Columbus sailed the ocean blue ... and slaughtered the indigenous ... - The Guardian | Global Education | Scoop.it

You told us about the Christopher Columbus that didn’t appear in your history books. The lesson: happy Indigenous Peoples’ Day!

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Why everyone should be able to read a map

Why everyone should be able to read a map | Global Education | Scoop.it
New research suggests that map reading is a dying skill in the age of the smartphone. Perish the thought, says Rob Cowen

Via Seth Dixon
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CT Blake's curator insight, September 2, 2014 4:21 PM

Especially Connor McCloud.

Lindley Amarantos's curator insight, September 5, 2014 9:17 AM

this can explain why it is important to NOT always rely on technology. It is good to keep your brain active and the spatial awareness that comes with reading a map is invaluable

Dolors Cantacorps's curator insight, September 5, 2014 3:13 PM

Practiquem-ho a classe doncs!

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38 maps that explain the global economy

38 maps that explain the global economy | Global Education | Scoop.it
Commerce knits the modern world together in a way that nothing else quite does. Almost anything you own these days is the result of a complicated web of global interactions. And there's no better way to depict those interactions than some maps.

Via Seth Dixon
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Mr. Lavold's curator insight, September 28, 2014 7:05 PM

Many ideological issues  relate to economics - and many economic issues related to geography. Take a look at these maps and see if they help you understand the global economy and where Canada fits in. Consider how different ideologies might view these maps and the data that they contain.

Maghfir Rafsan Jamal's curator insight, September 28, 2014 10:45 PM

I find a treasure.. :D

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, October 1, 2014 11:14 PM

Unit 6

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The Fight of Their Lives - The New Yorker

The Fight of Their Lives - The New Yorker | Global Education | Scoop.it
The New Yorker
The Fight of Their Lives
The New Yorker
With as many as thirty million people spread across the Middle East, the Kurds claim to be the world's largest ethnic group without a country.
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The influence of religion

The influence of religion | Global Education | Scoop.it
Find breaking news, multimedia, reviews & opinion on Minneapolis, St. Paul, the Twin Cities metro area and Minnesota.
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High School Students Interviewed

Jay Leno interviews high school students knowledge of global issues and geographic understanding...as I'm sure you can guess, it isn't pretty. 


Via Seth Dixon
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Patti Griffiths Bryant's curator insight, August 27, 2013 12:17 PM

It's our virtual reality folks, kids' worlds are still only a big as their arms' length. #LetsGet4D #GlobalLearning for our #GlobalCommunity

 

Joe Blauw's comment, August 28, 2013 1:08 PM
I think it's sad that people aren't educated enough to know where main superpower countries are such as Great Britain or some of the terrorist countries that have been all over the news for several years I was surprised and disappointed
Norma Ellis's curator insight, September 2, 2013 7:28 AM

Worth sharing

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BBC - History - British History in depth: The Myth of the Renaissance in Europe

BBC - History - British History in depth: The Myth of the Renaissance in Europe | Global Education | Scoop.it
An alternative view, by Jeremy Brotton
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The Global, History Educator — Teaching, Historical Thinking, Professional Development, and Online Education ~ Hosted by Craig J. Perrier

The Global, History Educator — Teaching, Historical Thinking, Professional Development, and Online Education ~ Hosted by Craig J. Perrier | Global Education | Scoop.it
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Most Tibetans Genetically Adapted To The High Life

Most Tibetans Genetically Adapted To The High Life | Global Education | Scoop.it
Ninety percent of Tibetans share a genetic mutation that prevents their blood from becoming dangerously clogged with red blood cells at high altitudes—a response that can be deadly for non-native mountaineers. Karen Hopkin reports.

Via Seth Dixon
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Wilmine Merlain's curator insight, December 17, 2014 5:37 PM

Charles Darwin's theory on evolution seems to prove to work for the ancestors and natives of Tibetans who for nearly 8,000 years have managed to live in an environment most people would die at. With genetic mutation such as that of the people who live in the Tibetan mountains, Tibetan's have an advantage at living in various different places. That also brings up the questions, if Tibetans are able to live at such a high altitude, are they able to live in low latitudes where the rest of world lives? What would happen to their genetic make-up if that were a possibility? 

Alec Castagno's curator insight, December 17, 2014 10:45 PM

This is a fascinating example of evolutionary forces working on the human scale. The Tibetans were found to have a genetic adaptation that allows them to live better at the high elevations they live at. Their mutation stops dangerous blood clots that would otherwise form and make survival in that environment difficult. 

Brian Wilk's comment, January 31, 2:03 PM
Researchers from the University of Utah and Qinghai University in China have discovered two genes which assist ethnic Tibetans survive in the high altitude of the Himalayas. Their study, recently published in the journal Science, compared key genes in 31 unrelated Tibetans to those of 45 lowland Chinese and 45 Japanese people. They found that the EGLN1 and PPARA genes were responsible for the characteristic lower levels of hemoglobin in Tibetans - revealing half the genetic mystery in to what allows them to survive in the thin air. (Saenz, Genetics) The real story here is how efficiently the Tibetans highlanders utilize the oxygen in the blood without increasing hemoglobin levels, which when too high, impede circulation. Other cultures have the same success living in high altitude area but not without the increased hemoglobin. Researchers are still trying to piece together why this is so with the Tibetans. As the article goes on to say, this could have major positive effects on altitude sickness, and even lung diseases or conditions like asthma. The researchers did not utilize the whole genome to gather their results, wait until they have done this and I'm sure we'll see better uses come from their research.
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Industrial Revolution--Urban Game

Industrial Revolution--Urban Game | Global Education | Scoop.it

 

"Each student should have a large piece of butcher block paper (15x20).  They should use a pencil for this activity (color pencils are optional). Using the template provided, each student should make their own template.  It is crucial that size for each of the 'characters' in the city be the same. As you read each of the Rounds, your pace should increase so that by Round 15 the students will only have a short time to draw their buildings."


Via Seth Dixon
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Gordon de Snoo's curator insight, December 3, 2014 8:03 PM

An awesome interactive activity that enables students to see the physical changes that occurred in towns across Europe, specifically England and enables them to gain a  greater sense of appreciation for the changes that occurred. Learning within this real life context is oh so much better than via textbook :)

Alex Lewis's curator insight, January 12, 9:45 AM

I think this game would be interesting. Many of the cities would be extremely different, depending on the person. Some people may make their housing and schools and  larger, maybe to indicate a larger population, whereas some people may make their coal mines large, to indicate a large supply of natural resources.

jada_chace's curator insight, January 12, 9:49 AM

Playing the game allows students to make their own villages and plan how their industries will work. As they start to build their own town they have to consider where to place the stores and where to place the factories. Putting these structures into certain places can affect the student’s town.

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Why girls in India are still missing out on the education they need

Why girls in India are still missing out on the education they need | Global Education | Scoop.it
India is no longer considered a poor country and yet many children do not receive a good education. Rachel Williams reports
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A hard look at corn economics — and world hunger

A hard look at corn economics — and world hunger | Global Education | Scoop.it
Corn is not what you think. For starters: Most of the time, it's not human food.

Via Seth Dixon
Denise Patrylo-Murray's insight:

Good for research papers

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Rachael Johns's curator insight, October 24, 2014 10:17 AM

The corn we are growing is not helping world hunger but is making the world more unhealthy. Most the corn that we grow is either going to be used as sweeteners or as feed for cows. When we feed this to the cows it is literally killing the cows that WE eat.

Nolan Walters's curator insight, October 25, 2014 11:29 AM

Most of the corn is not even going to us. Most of it goes to the animals, who eat it (which is cheaper than grass), which fatten them up for slaughter for humans.  Corn also gets turned into Corn Syrup, which fattens us.  The Corn industry is mostly to fatten up animals for meat for us humans in MDCs. 

Alex Lewis's curator insight, October 30, 2014 12:46 PM

The fact that we could use this land to grow surplus edible food instead of corn that isn't edible and goes to feed obese and unhealthy cows is sickening. There are millions of people dying in Africa and other LDC's from starvation, but we use our farmland to grow inedible corn and overfeed cows to the point of death. The corn is used to feed animals, and the animals are then slaughtered months, weeks or even days before they would've died of overfeeding. 

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How Standing Desks Can Help Students Focus in the Classroom - Mind/Shift

How Standing Desks Can Help Students Focus in the Classroom - Mind/Shift | Global Education | Scoop.it
The rise of the standing desk may appear to be a response to the modern, eat-at-your-desk, hunched-over worker chained to her computer, but history paints a different picture: Hemingway, Benjamin Franklin, and Thomas Jefferson all stood while they worked. Donald Rumsfeld had a standing desk, and so did Charles Dickens. Workplaces are moving toward more standing desks, but schools have been slower to catch on for a variety of reasons, including cost, convenience, and perhaps the assumption that “sit down and pay attention” is the best way to learn.

Via John Evans
Denise Patrylo-Murray's insight:

Easy fix for some kids, not everyone can sit for 84 minutes. What ever it takes for kids to learn, I am all for it!

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LET Team's curator insight, October 22, 2014 4:27 AM

Timely article. 

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The 100-Year-Old Agreement You Need to Know About to Understand What’s Driving the Islamic State

The 100-Year-Old Agreement You Need to Know About to Understand What’s Driving the Islamic State | Global Education | Scoop.it
Glenn Beck broke down the history of the Middle East on his television program Thursday, focusing on a nearly 100-year-old agreement that he says is integral to understanding the motivations of the Islamic State: the Sykes-Picot Agreement. If you do not understand the Sykes-Picot Agreement, Beck said, you...
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Oldest and Youngest Populations

Oldest and Youngest Populations | Global Education | Scoop.it

"There are 1.2 billion people between the ages of 15 and 24 in the world today — and that means that many countries have populations younger than ever before.  Some believe that this 'youth bulge' helps fuel social unrest — particularly when combined with high levels of youth unemployment.  Youth unemployment is a 'global time bomb,' as long as today’s millennials remain 'hampered by weak economies, discrimination, and inequality of opportunity.'  The world’s 15 youngest countries are all in Africa.  Of the continent’s 200 million young people, about 75 million are unemployed.

On the flip side, an aging population presents a different set of problems: Japan and Germany are tied for the world’s oldest countries, with median ages of 46.1. Germany’s declining birth rate might mean that its population will decrease by 19 percent, shrinking to 66 million by 2060. An aging population has a huge economic impact: in Germany, it has meant a labor shortage, leaving jobs unfilled."


Via Seth Dixon
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MsPerry's curator insight, September 21, 2014 3:16 PM

APHG-U2

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, October 1, 2014 11:17 PM

Unit 2

Alec Castagno's curator insight, December 17, 2014 11:05 AM

The extremely young median age seen across Africa hints at the problems found throughout the continent. This demographic factor suggests that there are other political, economic, and cultural problems that are influencing these young ages. It shows that most people do not live long lives, and even the older countries on the continent are younger than most other places. The only other place with low ages are the Middle East and Central Asia, and even their populations are several years older than the African continent.

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The perils of China's Silk Road revival - Aljazeera.com

The perils of China's Silk Road revival - Aljazeera.com | Global Education | Scoop.it
Aljazeera.com
The perils of China's Silk Road revival
Aljazeera.com
... opened western eyes to the richness of Central Asia and China - may prove a difficult balancing act.
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13 amazing coming of age traditions from around the world

13 amazing coming of age traditions from around the world | Global Education | Scoop.it

"The transition from childhood to adulthood -- the 'coming of age' of boys who become young men and girls who become young women -- is a significant stepping stone in everyone’s life. But the age at which this happens, and how a child celebrates their rite of passage into adolescence, depends entirely on where they live and what culture they grow up in.  Looking back, we'll never forget the majesty that was prom, or the excitement of hitting the dance floor at our friends' co-ed Bar and Bat Mitzvah parties, and why should we? Embarassing or amazing, they were pivotal moments in our lives that deserve remembering. On that note, here are thirteen of it the world’s most diverse coming of age traditions."

 

Tags: gender, folk culture, culture, indigenous, worldwide.


Via Seth Dixon
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Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, October 1, 2014 11:20 PM

Unit 3

Elizabeth Sheppard's comment, October 3, 2014 3:07 AM
Its interesting to see the different cultural traditions that are set at different stages in a persons life as the beginning into adulthood for most. I don't think I would want to be a male in the Brazilian Amazon, or the island of Vanuatu where you literally put your life on the line to prove your ready for adulthood. It shows the differences and what is considered important or the role the person plays in society. I think the mention of the sweet 16 for American girls was a pretty weak presentation. America is a melting pot and represents so much more than that.

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, October 27, 2014 11:59 AM

These traditions reflect the cultural geographies they take place within. In the Brazilian Amazon, the locals use the bullet ants native to the area to use in their Bullet Ant Initation. On North Baffin Island, where Inuits must be able to navigate and hunt in the wilderness of the artic, their coming of age involves a hunting journey that begins with them opening up the lines of communication between men and animals a relationship that the survival of the community hinges on. In the Amish tradition, they send their youth out into the world to witness the perils of modern society as a way to provide them with the choice of Amish Living. In Central and South America, girls have a Quinceanera where they girls solidifies their commitment to her family and faith two very important ideals of that culture. These coming of age traditions reflect the cultural differences between places throughout the world.

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BBC - History: Cold War

BBC - History: Cold War | Global Education | Scoop.it
What were the causes and events of the Cold War? What happened during the global superpower stand-off that brought the world to the brink of destruction?
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Google Drive - Quick reference guide for teachers and students

Google Drive - Quick reference guide for teachers and students | Global Education | Scoop.it
Having trouble getting your head around Google Drive and / or Google Docs?
Well stress no more with this great printable guide to using Google Drive.

Via John Evans
Denise Patrylo-Murray's insight:

Print for reference

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Chris Upton + helpers's comment, August 26, 2013 3:48 PM
got it...
Pippa Davies @PippaDavies 's comment, August 26, 2013 9:51 PM
Thanks Maria!:)
Ann Sciabarrasi's curator insight, December 22, 2013 7:01 PM

looks helpful