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What is the Flipped Classroom?

Presentation slides for virtual presentations about the flipped classroom-the full picture


Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge, Seth Dixon
Denise Patrylo-Murray's insight:

We use this at Hunterdon Central

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Siew Leng Lim's curator insight, September 2, 2013 4:32 AM

The bottom half - outside class resources and homework-based activities

The top half - in class sharing from experts and with experts, authentic work done usually in team or in collaboration with peers &/or expert; students to consolidate and sythesize their learning through presentation

roberto gilli's curator insight, September 6, 2013 9:54 AM

In the "Concept Exploration" phase of the flipped classroom it woud be nice to have a conversational agent to help students. A sort of Virtual Tutor.

roberto gilli's comment, September 6, 2013 10:43 AM
In the "Concept Exploration" phase of the flipped classroom it woud be nice to have a conversational agent to help students. A sort of Virtual Tutor.
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Transnationalizing Faith: Following Islam through German History, 1770-1918. | University of Oxford

Transnationalizing Faith: Following Islam through German History, 1770-1918. | University of Oxford | Global Education | Scoop.it
Transnationalizing Faith: Following Islam through German History, 1770-1918. The Relevance for Contemporary Britain. Hosted by the Ertegun Scholarship Pro
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The Red Atlas

The Red Atlas | Global Education | Scoop.it
The book The Red Atlas: How the Soviet Union Secretly Mapped the World, John Davies and Alexander J. Kent is published by University of Chicago Press.
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The American Dream

The American Dream | Global Education | Scoop.it
America. Land of the free. Home of the brave… Trace 60 years of a superpower in this major new exhibition.
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Interactive Gnomonic Map

Interactive Gnomonic Map | Global Education | Scoop.it

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 30, 2015 9:24 AM

As stated on USGS map projections page: "[Gnomonic maps are] used by some navigators to find the shortest path between two points.  Any straight line drawn on the map is on a great circle, but directions are true only from center point of projection."  This interactive is a very fun way  to visualize this and to understand distortion.

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Outsiders often using the Amish name for marketing

Outsiders often using the Amish name for marketing | Global Education | Scoop.it

"In and around Amish country, it's easy to find countless stores and websites advertising Amish quilts, Amish candy and Amish crafts. But though Mr. Zook is Amish, it would be impossible to tell from the name of his Evansburg farm, Maple Run, or his products, whose homemade labels make no mention of their maker's religion.  In fact, it's a good bet that if the word 'Amish' appears on a store or a product, the Amish themselves didn't put it there. Experts and Amish alike say that the name, used as a marketing tool, is almost exclusively the domain of the non-Amish."


Via Seth Dixon
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John Puchein's curator insight, November 6, 2015 7:37 AM

Great example of folk culture and cultural commodification. 

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, November 7, 2015 10:03 AM

unit 3

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, November 7, 2015 10:05 AM

unit 3

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100 African Cities Destroyed By Europeans

100 African Cities Destroyed By Europeans | Global Education | Scoop.it

"When tourists visit sub-Saharan Africa, they often wonder 'Why there are no historical buildings or monuments?'  The reason is simple. Europeans destroyed most of them. We only have a few drawings and descriptions by travelers who visited the places before their destruction. In some places, ruins are still visible. Many cities were abandoned when Europeans brought exotic diseases (smallpox and influenza) which started spreading and killing people. Most of those cities lie hidden. In fact the biggest part of Africa history is still under the ground."


Via Seth Dixon
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Chris Costa's curator insight, October 27, 2015 4:27 PM

The issues with poverty and hunger that grip certain parts of Africa- particularly the sub-Sahara- find their roots in the utter subversion and destruction of African societies and states during the Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade and the subsequent colonization of Africa. European traders placed significant strain of existing African states during the 14th and 15th centuries, as the emergence of "slave states" and the extent of the trade completely changed the demographics of much of Africa. Labor shortages lead to technological shortfalls as well as the dissolution of many African states, as predatory states continued to destroy many civilizations and cultures. By the time that the majority of the West had banned the trade in the 19th century, the damage had already been done; many of the great civilizations of Africa had regressed or been entirely wiped out under the pressure of Europe's demand for slaves. The subsequent colonization of the continent only worsened matters for the Africans, as major hubs of civilization were captured, raided, and destroyed. Traditional societies were subjected to European influences and religion and eventually lost, and yet Europeans looked at the destruction and the lack of economic and political progress their actions had caused and blamed it on the inferiority of the Africans themselves. History has not been kind to Africa, and it is important to remember that that is not her fault. Many civilizations, cities, and states were lost as a direct result of contact with Europeans during the slave trade and the subsequent colonization of the continent. 

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, October 30, 2015 6:34 AM

Before European contact, Africa had a number of great urban cities. European arrival foresaw the destruction of those once grand cities. The Europeans brought diseases such as smallpox and influenza to the African continent. Those diseases would hamper the previously unexposed African population. Slavery also drained Africa of millions of people as well. Great African civilizations were brought down by these various calamities. European  arrival was the death knell of the great African civilizations. Africa is still living with this legacy of destruction. Africa is the most rural region in the world, because of this legacy.

Gene Gagne's curator insight, November 4, 2015 4:07 PM

Just another way to eliminate any African culture or customs.

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The Idea of Race

You may know exactly what race you are, but how would you prove it if somebody disagreed with you? Jenée Desmond Harris explains. And for more on how race is a social construct:
http://www.vox.com/2014/10/10/6943461...

 

Tags: culture, race.


Via Seth Dixon
Denise Patrylo-Murray's insight:

I am always trying to explain to my students that race is a social construct-hopefully this video will help them to understand this concept.

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Javier Antonio Bellina's curator insight, June 27, 2015 9:10 AM

Thomas Masaryk, político y humanista checo, llegó a Estados Unidos y se encontró con el cuestionario que preguntaba entre otras cosas a qué raza pertenecía el inmigrante. Tras pensarlo un rato, escribió: La Humana.

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The Ardennes and the Battle of the Bulge, by Anthony Beevor

The Ardennes and the Battle of the Bulge, by Anthony Beevor | Global Education | Scoop.it
History allows us to understand our modern world. One of the most important historical periods for understanding how our twenty-first century world took shape is the Second World War. Historians play a key part in this process as they unpack these stories and their complicated nuances, allowing us to understand our past. One of the …
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Home | AC History Units

Home | AC History Units | Global Education | Scoop.it

AC History Units presents 8 units developed by the History Teachers' Association of Australia to support teachers in the implementation of the Australian Curriculum: History ...A major goal has been to provide the conceptual background (in Unit 1) and concrete examples (in Units 2-8) to assist teachers in designing their own programs and learning sequences for other topics and year levels.

 

 


Via Maree Whiteley, Robert Kidd
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use for war units

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Maree Whiteley's curator insight, May 15, 2013 12:04 PM

Primary and secondary AC History units...a fantastic resource site! Well done HTAA!

Clare Treloar's curator insight, May 31, 2013 11:35 PM

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Robert Kidd's curator insight, January 3, 2014 2:01 AM

Major Thomas Anderson Kidd served with the 10th Light Horse in Gallipoli and Egypt, was wounded and became seriously ill with Cholera.

 

He wrote diaries which he embellished with maps and diagrams. He was Mentioned in Despatches for gallantry in May & August 1915 and he suggested Hugo Throssell get the Victoria Cross at Hill 60.

 

I edited a transcript of Tom’s re-written diary and began to understand his frustration with the foolishness of some orders and the impossibility of many aspects of the campaigns that he was involved in.

 

In my extensive reading I have found these words have been used to describe him; cool, calm, fair, caring, splendid, brave, fearless, reckless, bullet proof & the men even considered him bomb proof!

 

These men and their families obviously had a life both before & after their war service and I am interested in all facets; particularly the affect war had on them.

 

My book "Uncle Tom's Diary" is a young adult novella about the discovery of one of his diaries ... and secrets!

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Most Tibetans Genetically Adapted To The High Life

Most Tibetans Genetically Adapted To The High Life | Global Education | Scoop.it
Ninety percent of Tibetans share a genetic mutation that prevents their blood from becoming dangerously clogged with red blood cells at high altitudes—a response that can be deadly for non-native mountaineers. Karen Hopkin reports.

Via Seth Dixon
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Danielle Lip's curator insight, April 7, 2015 9:27 PM

The fact that the people in Tibet have become environmentally and culturally adapted to the land shows just how serious the whole mutation is. Many people who would travel to such high heights would not be able to respond in the same was as the Tibetans. This mutation prevents blood from becoming severely clogged and could injure those who are not mountaineers in the area. This mutation started about 8,000 years ago which is interesting because who was the first person to have this gene mutation and what caused the mutation? Tibetan people have a rare gene sequence that shows just how special they are to their land and I find it quite interesting because not everyone would be able to live with it? What would happen if the people of Tibet happen to move someone outside of Tibet, would their blood start to clog? 

90% of people in Tibet have this gene sequence and shows how the gene adaptation will change due to levels of height, having a play on words because the Tibetan people are always at very high levels. Thin air and clogged blood are not a good combination.

Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, April 15, 2015 9:45 AM

This is extremely interesting.  When I think of the mutated gene that most Tibetans have I think of evolution happening right in front of our eyes.  Most lowland humans would not be able to survive at the Tibetan level of living, which goes to show you that over time the people who live in this area were naturally selected due to the special genes of their ancestors who survived while others without the gene died off.

Kevin Nguyen's curator insight, December 7, 2015 1:01 PM

The Tibetans are very amazing in the ways to adapting to high altitudes. Being 15,000 ft in elevation with 40% less oxygen than at sea level is very impressive. Many people like myself would find it difficult breathing in this conditions , but the Tibetans developed a mutation that lead them to not having their red blood cells clogged at this elevation. A perfect example of human adapting to their surrounding environment.

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Industrial Revolution--Urban Game

Industrial Revolution--Urban Game | Global Education | Scoop.it

 

"Each student should have a large piece of butcher block paper (15x20).  They should use a pencil for this activity (color pencils are optional). Using the template provided, each student should make their own template.  It is crucial that size for each of the 'characters' in the city be the same. As you read each of the Rounds, your pace should increase so that by Round 15 the students will only have a short time to draw their buildings."


Via Seth Dixon
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jada_chace's curator insight, January 12, 2015 9:49 AM

Playing the game allows students to make their own villages and plan how their industries will work. As they start to build their own town they have to consider where to place the stores and where to place the factories. Putting these structures into certain places can affect the student’s town.

Emily Bian's curator insight, May 22, 2015 9:44 AM

This was the game we played in class!!!

I really enjoyed this game and highly recommend it to future APHUG students because it was fun, informative, and FUN. It really helped me understand how England got really crowded all of the sudden due to the Industrial Revolution. It was a sudden urban sprawl with no  urban planning. My map/ city was a complete mess! 

I hope this game continues to be played as it is a fun introduction to the chaos of the Industrial Revolution. 

Campbell Ingraham's curator insight, May 25, 2015 2:57 PM

We played this game in our APHUG class. It really simulated how urban development exploded in the industrial revolution. It gives an explanation as to why urban planners at the time had poor design choices because they had little time to plan. They also didn't account for future population growth or new developments in technology. It really shows why today's older cities have poorer designs and more traffic. 

 

This article relates to the Industrial Revolution. It shows the population explosions which occurred as a result and the increased technology during the time. All of these factors of the industrial revolution in England contributed to the quick and poorly designed English cities which led to population overflow. These city planners could not have predicted what would happen or how to plan for more people. They also limited time, money, and resources, as the population just continued to grow and grow. 

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Why girls in India are still missing out on the education they need

Why girls in India are still missing out on the education they need | Global Education | Scoop.it
India is no longer considered a poor country and yet many children do not receive a good education. Rachel Williams reports
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Transnationalizing Faith: Following Islam through German History, 1770-1918. The Relevance for Contemporary Britain.

Transnationalizing Faith: Following Islam through German History, 1770-1918. The Relevance for Contemporary Britain. | Global Education | Scoop.it
Exhibition at Ertegun House, University of Oxford
Sat May 13 - Sun May 14, 2017

Opening Hours:

Sat & Sun, 10am – 4pm
Sat, 11am, Introductory Talk by Dr James Hodkinson, University of Warwick

Admission free and open to all.

For further information: http://ertegun.ox.ac.uk/news-events/transnationalizing-faith-following-islam-through-german-history-1770-1918-relevance

Please register for your free ticket here: http://www.oxforduniversitystores.co.uk/product-catalogue/humanities-division/humanities-division-ertegun-house/transnationalizing-faith-following-islam-through-german-history-17701918

About the exhibition:
Hosted by the Ertegun Scholarship Programme, this exhibition invites you to look at Islam through the eyes of the German-speaking world. It takes you on a journey through the first phase of modern German history, starting in around 1770 and moving through to the end of the First World War in 1918. During that time Germany went from being an idealistic notion to a nation state – indeed it became an Empire with colonial interests in Africa and Asia. Not surprisingly, the German vision of the Islamic world changed greatly, and was shaped by advances in learning, the increased movement of people and objects, and shifts in political, intellectual and cultural history. Germany’s evolving political and cultural relationship with the great Islamic empire of the Ottoman Turks played a central role throughout this period.

The exhibition also considers the position of Islam in German-speaking Austria, which had borne the brunt of Ottoman aggression since the 16th century: later, though, Austria became a multicultural Empire, fused with Hungary and other states, and was also home to European Muslim citizens.

Throughout you will find images and short texts in which contrasting ideas and images of Islam from the German-speaking lands are presented. The banners are arranged in chronological order and a timeline will help you place people and events. Later in the exhibition, several banners offer a brief insight into the position of Islam in Germany today. The exhibition returns to a series of key ideas that help you to consider critically how Islam and Muslims are represented in the material. You will also be prompted to reflect on how these ideas relate to your own experiences, understanding and perception of Islam and Muslims in the UK today. The exhibition is the product of original academic research though is pitched in such a way that it will speak to interested, non-academic visitors. Undegraduate students and ‘A' Level students of MFL, Religious Studies and History will also find the material accessible. Workbooks are available for school groups on request.

The exhibition is touring in support of the ‘Transnationalizing Faith’ project run by Dr. James Hodkinson at the University of Warwick: https//warwick.ac.uk/transnationalizingfaith

Biography:
Dr James Hodkinson is Associate Professor in German in the School of Modern Languages and Cultures, University of Warwick and is a specialist in eighteenth and nineteenth-century German-language culture. His research explores Islam through German history and culture. The Transnationalizing Faith project is a multi-dimensional outreach project, which takes key aspects of James’ research into Islam in German history and culture (1770-1918) and finds multiple pathways along which to engage with this material meaningfully to varying audiences.

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BFI Mediatheques

BFI Mediatheques | Global Education | Scoop.it
At BFI Mediatheques you can watch over 2,500 complete films and TV programmes from the BFI National Archive free of charge.
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Why Mercator for the Web? Isn’t the Mercator bad?

Why Mercator for the Web? Isn’t the Mercator bad? | Global Education | Scoop.it

"As you may know, Google Maps uses the Mercator projection. So do other Web mapping services, such as Bing Maps and MapQuest. Over the years I’ve encountered antipathy toward the use of the Web Mercator from map projection people. I know of two distinct schools of opposition. One school, consisting of cartographic folks and map aficionados, thinks the Mercator projection is 'bad': The projection misrepresents relative sizes across the globe and cannot even show the poles, they are so inflated. The other school, consisting of geodesy folks, thinks mapping services have corrupted the Mercator projection, whether by using the wrong formulæ for it or by using the wrong coordinate system for it."


Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 30, 2015 8:41 AM

In this article you will find a thoughtful discussion of the reasons why the Mercator projection is disliked by many, but still so prevalent.  In ArcGIS online, you can Search For Groups and then enter Projected Basemaps to see many map projections on that platform. For more resources on understanding map projections, click here


Tags: mapping, visualization, map projections, cartography, perspective, unit 1 Geoprinciples.

Luis Cesar Nunes's curator insight, October 7, 2015 7:42 AM

Mercaror ArcGis

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Medicated Pain Relief Cream - Amish Origins

Medicated Pain Relief Cream - Amish Origins | Global Education | Scoop.it
Amish Origins medicated pain relief products work great for arthritis, joints, sore muscles, burns, itch and more. Creams, Spray and Greaseless salve.
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Sam Noble Museum - Preview: Galileo’s World and Through the Eyes of...

Sam Noble Museum - Preview: Galileo’s World and Through the Eyes of... | Global Education | Scoop.it
Preview: Galileo’s World and Through the Eyes of the Lynx: Galileo, Natural History and the AmericasJoin us in celebration of the University of Oklahoma’s 125th anniversary with a yearlong series of...
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WorksheetWorks.com

Find worksheets about Geography
Denise Patrylo-Murray's insight:

cool website-cannot wait to use it

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Why do people believe myths about the Confederacy? Because our textbooks and monuments are wrong.

Why do people believe myths about the Confederacy? Because our textbooks and monuments are wrong. | Global Education | Scoop.it
False history marginalizes African Americans and makes us all dumber.

 

Tags: race, conflict, racism, historical, the South, landscape, monuments.


Via Seth Dixon
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LoisCortez's curator insight, July 3, 2015 1:05 AM

well

ed alvarado's comment, July 4, 2015 12:31 AM
Thats amazing
Rebecca Cofield's curator insight, August 5, 2015 6:22 PM

Admittedly, I've got a thing for monuments in the cultural landscape.  This is a very nice article for a historical geographer on how memory and heritage are enshrined in the landscape; this process politicizes history in ways that shape the national narrative, and that shapes how we think in past.   Using historical geography to understand the debates in the news?  No way!!  Here James Loewen writes in the Washington Post on the topic for a general audience. 

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Scoop.it Resource Center - Learn how Content Curation Publishing can help marketers, social media professionals and knowledge managers

Scoop.it Resource Center - Learn how Content Curation Publishing can help marketers, social media professionals and knowledge managers | Global Education | Scoop.it
Free resources to understand how content curation can help professionals, marketers and knowledge managers.
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Cartoonist Urges Restraint Except When It Comes to Israel - Charisma News

Cartoonist Urges Restraint Except When It Comes to Israel - Charisma News | Global Education | Scoop.it
Illustrator Joe Sacco doesn't want to offend Muslims or Islam but certainly doesn't have an issue with insulting many others sects of the population.
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In Burma (Myanmar), China's Scramble for Energy Threatens Livelihoods of Villagers

In Burma (Myanmar), China's Scramble for Energy Threatens Livelihoods of Villagers | Global Education | Scoop.it
In western Myanmar a Chinese-backed energy and trading hub is taking shape on a remote island.

 

Tags: Burma, Southeast Asia, energy.


Via Seth Dixon
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Danielle Lip's curator insight, April 14, 2015 1:16 PM

While reading this article I found it quite shocking to see that Myanmar is scrambling for energy, such as selling oil, this money is used in lanterns as a cheaper alternative to kerosene. People will do anything just to receive money and use it to help out their families. Money is not something easily  accessible and neither is energy.Yet, even though Myanmar is struggling right now, places such as Beijing still see Myanmar and Ramree Island as the main way to have safe and fast trade. 

The article also states that there are promising signs to China, and Southeast Asia to come back into the picture such as they are likely to have development that will focus on manufacturing in textiles and construction materials to help the country to gain power and energy back. 

The photographs in this article give for a good example of how China is striving for energy such as the women holding up the teapot that is considered to be a lamp with the use of oil. People in China are working hard and using different resources to serve as energy. Shouldn't people even out of China use up what they have and not be wasteful? 

Places in Southeast Asia can think of ways to gain energy, power and comfort because their whole motto on life is different than that of the United States of America.

Gene Gagne's curator insight, December 1, 2015 9:05 PM

this is where china grows at the expense of others. How are these people going to fight back? China is forced to do this because it wants to be the strongest nation in the world and as long as they are importing oil it relies on someone that can cut them off. And as long as they now are allowing the birth of two children the population growth in china is forcing china to expand and will do whatever means necessary to do so.

Nicholas A. Whitmore's curator insight, December 19, 2015 4:28 AM

An interesting article that highlights important geographic disparities. The problem for Burma is that it has lagged behind in the world from its isolation. As a result when globalization such as the proposed trade zone in the article come about there is disastrous consequences. Unlike the west they are catching up and didn't have an adjusting period. Furthermore in China's race to keep its economy superior and out due America they have been going on wild spending sprees such as this deal to give them a global edge. Unfortunately this will leave many of the poor in Burma worse off than before. Plus their government will not likely help them because of their oppressive nature. Maybe all of this will create of revolution to give the Burmese freedom so that they can make these decisions for themselves as they enter the global community(also so they are not exploited as companies everywhere will likely be looking at its cheap labor and resources).

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Welcome to 'Geography Education'

Welcome to 'Geography Education' | Global Education | Scoop.it

Finding Materials: This site is designed for geography students and teachers to find interesting, current supplemental materials.  To search for place-specific posts, browse this interactive map.  To search for thematic posts organized by the APHG curriculum, see http://geographyeducation.org/thematic/. ; Also you can search for a keyword by clicking on the filter tab (looks like a funnel)  above in the upper-righthand corner.


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Rich Schultz's curator insight, November 18, 2014 2:10 PM

Geography and current events

Olivier Tabary's curator insight, November 28, 2014 12:06 PM

Many interesting tools to practice and to discover

Jamie Mitchell's curator insight, March 8, 2016 1:04 AM

Amazing resources about places and topics in Geography