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Global crop health
Understanding the complex interactions affecting global crop production
Curated by Paul Esker
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Yellow rust on course for worst-ever season

Yellow rust on course for worst-ever season | Global crop health | Scoop.it
Yellow rust is starting to be seen in winter wheat as the mild autumn weather encourages the spread of the cereal disease.
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Wheat geneticists to decode massive genome :: UC Davis News & Information

Wheat geneticists to decode massive genome :: UC Davis News & Information | Global crop health | Scoop.it
An international effort, led by University of California, Davis, scientists is in progress, aimed at sequencing a wheat ancestor’s genome, which is 40 percent larger than the human genome.

The

Via Borlaug Global Rust Initiative
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USA: GMO corn failing to protect fields from pest damage -report

USA: GMO corn failing to protect fields from pest damage -report | Global crop health | Scoop.it
Aug 28 (Reuters) - Researchers in the key corn-growing stateof Illinois are finding significant damage from rootworms infarm fields planted in a rotation with a genetically modifiedcorn that is supposed...

Via CIMMYT, Int.
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Rwanda: Maize Disease Leaves Rubavu Farmers Guessing

Rwanda: Maize Disease Leaves Rubavu Farmers Guessing | Global crop health | Scoop.it

Farmers in Rubavu District say they are threatened by a new maize disease (maize chlorotic mottle virus) which has attacked their farms and dried up the corns before harvest period.


Via CIMMYT, Int.
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Free Technology for Teachers: Climate Commons - An Interactive Map of Climate Change Stories

Free Technology for Teachers: Climate Commons - An Interactive Map of Climate Change Stories | Global crop health | Scoop.it

Via Dr Peter Carey
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Crop Science - Article | Crop Science Society of America

Crop Science - Article | Crop Science Society of America | Global crop health | Scoop.it

Abstrat: Yield improvements are critical to ensuring food security for a growing world population especially in view of the increasing potential for use of land in biofuel production. Efforts to sustain the impressive rate of past productivity gains, epitomized by such successes as the Green Revolution, are bound to rely on biotechnology innovations such as those responsible for the development of genetically engineered (GE) crops. Some argue that the use of biotechnology can substantially improve yields relative to the trajectory established by traditional breeding in the 20th century. Because U.S. adoption of GE varieties has been very strong since their introduction in the late 1990s, we investigated empirically whether and to what extent the GE technology has improved realized yields. We study this question for nonirrigated U.S. maize (Zea mays L.) and soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] yields over 1964 through 2010, having controlled for local effects, weather, fertilization, and the preexisting (non-GE) crop improvement trend. For maize we find that GE varieties have increased realized yields, with a stronger gain in the Central Corn Belt (CCB). For soybeans, GE varieties appear to have slightly reduced yields. For both crops we find a strong trend in yield growth, which may have accelerated in recent years within the CCB. However, the combined effects of yield trend and GE adoption are predicted to fall short of the growth rate envisioned by industry projections.

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Kenyan Farmers Battle Striga Weed

Kenyan Farmers Battle Striga Weed | Global crop health | Scoop.it

Dar es Salaam — Thousands of farmers in western Kenya are successfully battling the invasion of a deadly parasitic weed called Striga, dubbed the 'violet vampire' because of its beautiful violet flowers.


Via CIMMYT, Int.
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Australia: New wheat variety kicking goals

Australia: New wheat variety kicking goals | Global crop health | Scoop.it
WITH growers selecting new crop varieties based on yielding ability, grain quality and disease resistance, new Australian Hard (AH) wheat variety Wallup is shaping up to be one of the most reliable options for Victoria’s Wimmera and North...

Via CIMMYT, Int.
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CIMMYT, Int.'s comment, April 18, 2013 9:27 PM
Check information about wheat in Australia at Wheat Atlas: http://wheatatlas.cimmyt.org/country/AUS/
Katherine Hollaway's curator insight, August 28, 2013 11:40 PM

New Australian Hard (AH) wheat variety Wallup is shaping up to be one of the most reliable options for Victoria’s Wimmera and North Central regions.

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Philippines: Farmer-leader backs wider propagation of biotech corn

Philippines: Farmer-leader backs wider propagation of biotech corn | Global crop health | Scoop.it
The online version of the Philippines' leading business newspaper features virtually all the stories and statistical data available in the print edition.

Via CIMMYT, Int.
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Training: Kenya: Use of GIS and Remote Sensing in Climate Change Analysis and Adaption | Humanitarian News

Training: Kenya: Use of GIS and Remote Sensing in Climate Change Analysis and Adaption | Humanitarian News | Global crop health | Scoop.it
Country: Kenya Organization: IRES Registration deadline: 13 May 2013 Starting date: 27 May 2013 Ending date: 30 May 2013 INTRODUCTION This training will offer a set of methods and techniques that use GIS and Remote Sensing for analysis and...
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PLOS ONE: Shade Tree Diversity, Cocoa Pest Damage, Yield Compensating Inputs and Farmers' Net Returns in West Africa

PLOS ONE: Shade Tree Diversity, Cocoa Pest Damage, Yield Compensating Inputs and Farmers' Net Returns in West Africa | Global crop health | Scoop.it
PLOS ONE: an inclusive, peer-reviewed, open-access resource from the PUBLIC LIBRARY OF SCIENCE. Reports of well-performed scientific studies from all disciplines freely available to the whole world.
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PLOS ONE: Edges in Agricultural Landscapes: Species Interactions and Movement of Natural Enemies

PLOS ONE: Edges in Agricultural Landscapes: Species Interactions and Movement of Natural Enemies | Global crop health | Scoop.it
PLOS ONE: an inclusive, peer-reviewed, open-access resource from the PUBLIC LIBRARY OF SCIENCE. Reports of well-performed scientific studies from all disciplines freely available to the whole world.
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National contributions to observed global warming - IOPscience

There is considerable interest in identifying national contributions to global warming as a way of allocating historical responsibility for observed climate change.
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Wheat Breeder Cimmyt Works on Heat-Tolerant Crop for South Asia

Wheat Breeder Cimmyt Works on Heat-Tolerant Crop for South Asia | Global crop health | Scoop.it
Grain breeder Cimmyt will use genetic mapping to develop heat-tolerant wheat for South Asia, in a project funded by the U.S. Department of Agriculture aimed at boosting the crop’s resilience to climate change.

Via CIMMYT, Int.
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Nicole Kearsch's curator insight, November 21, 2014 8:42 PM

This article I find to be both good and bad.  Good because people are developing crops that will  be heartier as the climate changes, bad because it makes it seem like we are adjusting the crops to fit the temperature instead of trying to fix the temperature to better suit the crops we already have.  I see the good, I see that we have accepted climate change as reality and need to find a way for food to be able to still grow in the amounts that are needed to feed the seven billion people on this Earth.  Having the capability to genetically modify wheat so it can continue to grow in areas of south Asia is certainly a plus, without this technology we would be facing in the coming years major wheat shortages around the world, contributing even more to the problem of feeding everyone.  The bad side though, it's nice that we can adapt to the changing temperature but I feel like this is another way to just push global warming to the side.  The 'oh well we can change our food so nothing else matters right now'.  Well what happens when it comes to the point that we can't change our food anymore.  This is beneficial for the time being, people are hungry now and we need to do what we need to do to feed people, but the bigger picture of the fact that Earth's temperature is rising still needs to be in people's minds about how we are going to fix this problem.

Michael Mazo's curator insight, December 15, 2014 2:22 PM

With the rise in temperatures and global warming effects, the crops that were thriving in this once rich atmosphere has not been producing what it used to. With the help of genetic engineering, agriculture is now able to grow without limit in these high temperature areas. A staple for crop production in South Asia has been wheat, but one day they discovered it wasn't producing what they expected it to. Witnessing the weather and climate change they began pointing fingers. So to cope with the issue, seeds were modified to become heat-tolerant and in turn make use of the extra energy from the sun to sprout into crops larger than they were before without the expense of lower nutrition 

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A review on crop losses, epidemiology and disease management of rice brown spot to identify research priorities and knowledge gaps - Springer

AbstractRice brown spot (BS) is a chronic disease that affects millions of hectares of rice every growing season, grown by some of the most resource-poor farmers. Despite its widespread occurrence and impact, much still needs to be understood about BS. Reported yield losses in relative terms vary widely from 4 to 52 %. However, accurate, systematic estimates are lacking. BS is conventionally perceived as a secondary problem that reflects rice crops that experience physiological stresses, e.g. drought and poor soil fertility, rather than a true infectious disease. Much remains to be understood about the mechanisms leading to epidemics and crop losses. Quantitative and qualitative knowledge gaps exist in our understanding of the epidemiological processes, sources of resistance and biocontrol methods. In this review we identify several of these gaps, which if filled, could lead to a strong impact on the management of brown spot. We also use the architecture of a simulation model to position and prioritize these knowledge gaps, assess the epidemiological consequences of disease management options on BS monocyclic processes and explore the impact changing production situations on this important disease. 

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Crop rotation with nematode-resistant wheat can protect tomatoes

Crop rotation with nematode-resistant wheat can protect tomatoes | Global crop health | Scoop.it
Washington DC (SPX) May 15, 2013 -
In a study published online today in Crop Science, scientists describe a nematode-resistant wheat.

Via SustainOurEarth
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The Great Green Wall Of Africa -- A 4,000 Mile Defense Against Climate Change | PlanetSave

The Great Green Wall Of Africa -- A 4,000 Mile Defense Against Climate Change | PlanetSave | Global crop health | Scoop.it

One of the most unique large-scale international climate change projects is underway in Africa. A 4,000 mile “wall of trees” is being constructed across the east-west axis of the continent as a defense against rapid, expanding desertification of the Sahara.

 

 


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Genetically modified crops needed to 'feed the world,' says UK Government's chief scientific advisor - Independent (2013)

Genetically modified crops needed to 'feed the world,' says UK Government's chief scientific advisor - Independent (2013) | Global crop health | Scoop.it

The case for genetically modified (GM) food is getting stronger because of its importance as a tool to feed a growing global population, according to the Government’s new chief scientific adviser. Sir Mark Walport, who is one month into his new job, said today that he will aim to offer ministers the best and most accurate advice on all aspects of science policy, including the introduction of GM crops.

 

“The issue is European regulation, which is that Europe grows remarkably little genetically modified crops so I don’t think this is something that is going to change overnight... But I think it is inexorably rising up the agenda again because as a technology it is showing its value more and more obviously in terms of the crops that are able to feed the world,” he said.

 

Public opposition to GM food, and the reluctance of supermarkets to stock it, has hindered the kind of wide-scale farming of genetically engineered crops seen in other parts of the world, notably North and South America. However, Sir Mark questioned whether the majority of the public are as opposed to the technology as some GM critics have argued. He also said GM crops should be considered on a case-by-case basis.

 

“For every genetic modification you have to ask: what plant, what gene and for what purpose? The case will be strong for some and not strong for others. Each case has to be decided on its merits,” Sir Mark said. “If it were possible for instance to develop a blight-resistant potato then that would be a valuable thing to do,” he said referring to a GM potato variety that is resistant to the fungal pest.

 

“I think the job of a scientific adviser is to set out the scientific case and that scientific case [for GM] it becoming stronger and stronger and stronger. But ultimately I’m very clear that my job is to advise on the science and it is then the politician’s job to decide how to use that. The final decision is a political decision,” Sir Mark said.

 

A two-year trial of a GM variety of aphid-resistant wheat is underway at Rothamsted Research in Harpenden, Hertfordshire. Sir Mark said that it is unfortunate that a large part of the trial’s costs is being spent on security to prevent the field being destroyed by anti-GM campaigners. “The rule of law is absolutely paramount and in a sense you can say that it is a tragedy to spend so much on the rule of law for something like this,” he said... 


Via Alexander J. Stein
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Kenya: Lethal Maize Disease Signs Scares Nandi Farmers

Kenya: Lethal Maize Disease Signs Scares Nandi Farmers | Global crop health | Scoop.it

Maize Lethal Necrosis disease has affected farms in parts of the Rift Valley. Some farmers in parts of Nandi county have reported that maizeon their farms are turning yellow and drying up two months after they were planted.


Via CIMMYT, Int.
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Sustainable Harvest Launches Disaster Relief Effort For Organic Coffee Farmers in Latin America | Sustainable Brands

Sustainable Harvest Launches Disaster Relief Effort For Organic Coffee Farmers in Latin America | Sustainable Brands | Global crop health | Scoop.it

Gap analysis results have been completed for CWR taxa related to 29 crops, including maps displaying distributions, patterns of richness, and areas worldwide where CWR are particularly in need of collecting for conservation.


Via Ricard Lloria
Paul Esker's insight:
Living in Costa Rica, it is readily apparent the effects that this disease has had on coffee producers this growing season. The next time you purchase your coffee, stop and think a bit about this situation as it affects a large area in Central America.
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Stopping Striga before it’s started

By Abigail Rumsey: The flowers might look pretty but Striga has affected millions of hectares of crops in Africa.
Striga hermonthica, or witchweed, is the main weed affecting many cereals including rice, maize, sorghum and millet. It is responsible for more crop loss in Africa than any other individual species of weed. Striga is a hemi-parasitic weed; its roots latch onto the roots of its host (e.g. a crop plant such as rice) and take water and nutrients from the host plant.


Via Knapco
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Bumper Pakistan wheat crop expected

Bumper Pakistan wheat crop expected | Global crop health | Scoop.it

Islamabad—Due to favourable climate conditions, sufficient availability of agricultural inputs and best management practices, bumper wheat crop production of 25 million tons is expected during the current year.


Via CIMMYT, Int.
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PLOS ONE: Association between Virulence and Triazole Tolerance in the Phytopathogenic Fungus Mycosphaerella graminicola

PLOS ONE: Association between Virulence and Triazole Tolerance in the Phytopathogenic Fungus Mycosphaerella graminicola | Global crop health | Scoop.it
PLOS ONE: an inclusive, peer-reviewed, open-access resource from the PUBLIC LIBRARY OF SCIENCE. Reports of well-performed scientific studies from all disciplines freely available to the whole world.
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AgEcon Search >>> Research in Agricultural & Applied Economics

AgEcon Search >>> Research in Agricultural & Applied Economics | Global crop health | Scoop.it

AgEcon Search now contains over 60,000 papers!

 

AgEcon Search is a free, open access repository of full-text scholarly literature in agricultural and applied economics, including:

Working papersConference papersJournal articles

 

AgEcon Search: Research in Agricultural and Applied Economics collects, indexes, and electronically distributes full text copies of scholarly research in the broadly defined field of agricultural economics including sub disciplines such as agribusiness, food supply, natural resource economics, environmental economics, policy issues, agricultural trade, and economic development.

 

The majority of items in AgEcon Search are working papers, conference papers, and journal articles, although other types such as books chapters and government documents are included.

 

AgEcon Search will serve as the permanent archive for this literature and encourages authors and organizations to use this electronic library as the storehouse for additional appropriate scholarly electronic works.

 

Post Image: http://bit.ly/YzxwNp


Via Mhd.Shadi Khudr
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