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American Migration [Interactive Map] - Forbes

American Migration [Interactive Map] - Forbes | Global Connections | Scoop.it
Every year, close to 40 million Americans move from one home to another. This interactive map visualizes those moves for every county in the country.
Jamie Strickland's insight:

This is a neat visualization of county to county migration flows using anonymized IRS data.  In the accompanying article, geographer Michael Conzen and demographer Bill Frey provide insights (in addition to two other experts).

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In this Nepali village, almost every family has a son or a daughter in the Middle East

In this Nepali village, almost every family has a son or a daughter in the Middle East | Global Connections | Scoop.it
A growing number of Nepali young men and women are leaving their homes in hopes of finding better jobs.
Jamie Strickland's insight:

This is a very good article that illustrates international labor migration - not just economically motivated immigration, but labor migration that is facilitated (contracted) by State agencies.  The Philippines are commonly used as an example for this phenomenon.  Now, we have the example of Nepal.

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Why do people choose to live in the ‘worst city in the world?’

Why do people choose to live in the ‘worst city in the world?’ | Global Connections | Scoop.it
Baghdad has a bad reputation.
Jamie Strickland's insight:

Here is an interesting piece on urban quality of life from the Washington Post's Worldviews blog.  It looks at a private human resources firm's ranking of the best and worst cities to live in for expatriates.  Rankings are fraught with problems, but give a very interesting window into the factors that influence where we would like to live, as well as where we are "willing" to live....for the right price.

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The slow decline of American Chinatowns

The slow decline of American Chinatowns | Global Connections | Scoop.it
Chinatowns across the US have lost much of their original character, but the one in Manhattan has remained a thriving immigrant community. That may now be changing.
Jamie Strickland's insight:
This article outlines significant changes occurring in an iconic ethnic landscape in the United States. Great example of urban social change and the implications of gentrification.
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9 questions about Ukraine you were too embarrassed to ask

9 questions about Ukraine you were too embarrassed to ask | Global Connections | Scoop.it
Yes, the first question is "What is Ukraine?"
Jamie Strickland's insight:

This comes from my favorite blog on the Washington Post's website (Worldviews).  I have marked this for my courses that deal with global connections (LBST 2102) and world regional geography (GEOG 1101).   In addition to serving as a potential example when talking about Eastern Europe in a regional course, this article and its accompanying video illustrates the potential for ethnic conflict within a country that stems from historical border/boundary changes.  This is a great way to talk about the importance of language as an indicator of ethnicity and the implications of that for political conflict.

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Burka Avenger

"Burka Avenger is a new Pakistani kids' show about a mild-mannered teacher who moonlights as a burka-clad superhero."


Via Seth Dixon
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Shelby Porter's curator insight, November 4, 2013 7:13 AM

This short introduction to the television show is comical and seems interesting to many different age groups. It highlights a teacher in a burka helping the children and trying to stop bad people. It shows that gender has nothing to do with the ability to defend and help someone. If this woman can do it in a burka, anyone could. I think it will show a positive message in Pakistan where gender equality isn't fully understood. While many people will treat it as just another crime-fighting television show, hopefully some children will take some positive messages away. 

Marissa Roy's curator insight, December 2, 2013 1:40 PM

My geography class watched this. It is an interesting example of how different cultures can mesh together, such as the Burka Avenger and Wonder Woman. It is really interesting that the Burka Avenger is a school teacher by day, which shows how highly educators are thought of in the society.

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, April 10, 6:27 AM

This is great!  It is a cute animated trailer to the cartoon series the Burka Avenger!  She wears a burka to hide her identity which it certainly does, and then she kicks the bad guy’s butts!  A great gender reversal in this area, showing women can be a hero and stand up to men.  And she cleverly uses the restrictive clothing to keep her identity concealed. 

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Not always with us

Not always with us | Global Connections | Scoop.it
IN SEPTEMBER 2000 the heads of 147 governments pledged that they would halve the proportion of people on the Earth living in the direst poverty by 2015, using the...
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In Smithfield, residents digest news of sale

In Smithfield, residents digest news of sale | Global Connections | Scoop.it
Some hope Chinese owners create new economic possibilities, while others fear a “downward spiral.”
Jamie Strickland's insight:

I often look for examples to share with my students about how "force of globalization" interact at various geographic scales.  This is a very good example of changes associated with global food production and consumption and the impact those can have on local places.

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Aral Sea Basin

Aral Sea Basin | Global Connections | Scoop.it

"Dust blows from what was once the Aral Sea floor. Tragic mismanagement of a natural resource."


Via Seth Dixon
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Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, February 20, 6:49 PM

This is a sad reality humans must live with forever and something we as people must learn from. A man made disaster that occurred many years ago has a negative impact on areas surrounding the shrinking Aral Sea to this day. People cannot exploit an area of water this large, as this is not only harming the environment, but many human beings, as well

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, March 3, 6:24 AM

This startling picture from space of the Aral Sea is heartbreaking.  The destruction of this inland sea is a terrible thing to behold.

Jess Deady's curator insight, April 30, 5:36 PM

The Aral Sea Basin has been a topic of conversation throughout geography for many reasons. What used to be filled with water is now blowing dust because its that dry? This basin is no longer a natural resource.

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The Golan Heights

The Golan Heights | Global Connections | Scoop.it

In early November 2012, three Syrian tanks entered the demilitarized zone (DMZ) of the Golan Heights. The move by Syria is the first violation of the zone in 40 years and concerns countries of the region. Since then some of the Syrian rebels have also been reported operating in Golan Heights.


Via Seth Dixon
Jamie Strickland's insight:

This map can be used to illustrate not only the political and cultural significance of the Golan Heights, but also its environmental significance as a source of water for the Jordan-Yarmuk River Valley

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chris tobin's curator insight, April 2, 2013 8:12 PM

The Golan Heights is a major source of the Jordan River.  Its mountains border along Lebanon and Syria and provide rain and snowmelt to feed the river to provide a vital water source (strategic area and vital water source).  Israel took it in 1967 - and the DMZ was entered by war torn Syria in November 2012 .

The DMZ was entered by Syria and Israel reported this to the UN ....so, as civil war in Syria threatens its neighbors , there is a fear of retaliation that may occur in the Gaza Strip as well.

Louis Culotta's curator insight, April 4, 2013 3:35 PM

Heres some info on how poeple have been living in regards to a troubled area of the world.

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, March 19, 6:08 AM

This article stresses the importance of geography when discussing political situation with neighboring countries.  The fact that the heights are such a strategic advantage to whoever owns them explains why they are so contested.  As long as these two countries are not friendly nations this disagreement over the strategic point will continue.

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Israel’s Palestinian-only buses draw accusations of segregation, apartheid

Israel’s Palestinian-only buses draw accusations of segregation, apartheid | Global Connections | Scoop.it
Israel's Transportation Ministry launched the new bus lines after settlers complained Palestinians were a "security risk"
Jamie Strickland's insight:

"Separate but equal" in the West Bank.....

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Geography, health belong in Temecula schools - U-T San Diego

Geography, health belong in Temecula schools - U-T San Diego | Global Connections | Scoop.it
Geography, health belong in Temecula schools U-T San Diego This move makes absolutely no sense — particularly the move to strike geography, which in my day was every bit as important as the fabled “three R's.” At a time when globalization is one of...
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A Mysterious Patch Of Light Shows Up In The North Dakota Dark : NPR

A Mysterious Patch Of Light Shows Up In The North Dakota Dark : NPR | Global Connections | Scoop.it
If you are up in space looking down on America west of the Mississippi, one of the brightest patches of light at night is on the Great Plains in North Dakota. It's not a city, not a town, not a military installation.
Jamie Strickland's insight:

How cool is this?!?!  Thanks gain to Seth Dixon for the heads up.  This one is becoming a bonus question for class next week.

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Jesse Olsen's comment, February 18, 2013 11:28 AM
That video is incredible
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Arrests Made in Maple Syrup Theft From Quebec Warehouse

Arrests Made in Maple Syrup Theft From Quebec Warehouse | Global Connections | Scoop.it
The police in Quebec arrested three men in connection with the theft of six million pounds of syrup from Canada’s global strategic maple syrup reserve.
Jamie Strickland's insight:

And you thought oil was a valuable commodity....And no comments about "sticky situations" please!

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Crimean Tatars Will Have to Vacate Land

Crimean Tatars Will Have to Vacate Land | Global Connections | Scoop.it
Ukraine’s breakaway region of Crimea will ask Tatars to vacate part of the land where they now live in exchange for new territory elsewhere in the region, a top Crimean government official said Tuesday.

 

Crimean Deputy Prime Minister Rustam Temirgaliyev said in an interview with RIA Novosti on Tuesday the new government in Crimea, where residents voted Sunday to become part of Russia, wants to regularize the land unofficially taken over by Crimean Tatar squatters following the collapse of the Soviet Union.

“We have asked the Crimean Tatars to vacate part of their land, which is required for social needs,” Temirgaliyev said. “But we are ready to allocate and legalize many other plots of land to ensure a normal life for the Crimean Tatars,” he said.


Via Seth Dixon
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Stephen Zimmett's curator insight, March 20, 8:55 AM

The same thing happened to these people back during World War 11. I saw this on Al Jazeera

Stephen Zimmett's comment, March 20, 8:57 AM
The same thing happened to these people back in World War11
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Qatar's foreign domestic workers subjected to slave-like conditions

Qatar's foreign domestic workers subjected to slave-like conditions | Global Connections | Scoop.it
Revelations of mistreatment of maids and cleaners add to picture of widespread labour abuse in World Cup host nation
Jamie Strickland's insight:

This article deals with international labor migration in Qatar, the next country to host the FIFA World Cup after Brazil.  This highlights the abuses some domestic workers face when they leave their home country for employment.  It also highlights the institutionalized nature of labor migration in the Philippines.  This would make a good companion piece to the chapter on Qatar in "The Geography of Bliss".

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The slow decline of American Chinatowns

The slow decline of American Chinatowns | Global Connections | Scoop.it
Chinatowns across the US have lost much of their original character, but the one in Manhattan has remained a thriving immigrant community. That may now be changing.
Jamie Strickland's insight:
This article outlines significant changes occurring in an iconic ethnic landscape in the United States. Great example of urban social change and the implications of gentrification.
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Ship-Shipping Ships

Ship-Shipping Ships | Global Connections | Scoop.it

"This is a ship-shipping ship, shipping shipping ships."  http://geographyeducation.org/2013/10/14/ship-shipping-ships/

 


Via Seth Dixon
Jamie Strickland's insight:

First, this is a fantastic photo...a freighter shipping other freighters.  As my colleague Seth Dixon points out, this is a fantastic image of one of the important drivers of the acceleration of globalization in recent history.  

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dilaycock's curator insight, October 14, 2013 10:14 PM

Pretty amazing!

jim dzialo's curator insight, October 16, 2013 11:54 AM

Pretty sure that doesn't fit in the panama canal

 

L.Long's curator insight, February 16, 1:28 AM

The two industries that are the real backbone of globalization are transportation and communication.  What has accelerated the pace of global interconnectedness is the scale of these devices and their ubiquity in facilitating massive global commerce.

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Bolivia: A Country With No McDonald’s

Bolivia: A Country With No McDonald’s | Global Connections | Scoop.it
What America can learn from one of the most sustainable food nations on Earth.

Via Seth Dixon
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Jess Deady's curator insight, February 20, 3:27 PM

McDonalds is a social and economical chain restaurant that has not made its way to Bolivia. Sure, they like hamburgers but they prefer to get them from the women hawking them on the streets. Who can blame them? When is the last time you bought something that was made in America? Probably a couple weeks or months even. Cultural traditions are fading out fast and moves like this are what will keep Bolivians culturally enabled.

Paige Therien's curator insight, March 1, 1:21 PM

There is much valuable information to learn from other countries and cultures, especially when it comes to food because subsistence greatly shapes a culture.  Of course, the United States is very different than Bolivia in terms of culture and geography, but there is a lot to take away from the structural rejection of McDonalds in Bolivia.  Bolivia has taken advantage of the altitudinal zonation that is characteristic of their mountainous country; they have formed a system of reciprocity which fosters strong community and leaves no room for giant food corporations such as McDonald.  If people in the United States want a change in their food systems, the first step is rejecting the systems that should not play a role, but currently do.  Institutions like McDonalds have allowed people to be so far removed from their food sources, and ultimately, an important characteristic unique to humanity (food producers).

Amy Marques's curator insight, April 24, 6:41 AM

       It's interesting that globalization is one of the reasons for the growth of fast food chains like McDonald’s around the world. It’s hard for countries to turn down a food company who really does configure their menu to the consumers their serving. I find it interesting that Bolivia found a way to resist this. Its topography is what made the last store close in 2002. McDonald’s couldn’t survive in the mountainous country with the Andes and the Amazon. They were able to resist because the nation always prioritized local control of its food system and eating healthy. Its people value food, food producers, and their ecosystems

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Map of World's Flight Paths Is Gorgeous, Illuminating

The United States and China may be the world's biggest economic engines, but on this gorgeous map of the world's flight paths, Europe glows brighter than either one.
Jamie Strickland's insight:

This is pretty impressive....global connections in action...

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The spread of genetically modified crops

The spread of genetically modified crops | Global Connections | Scoop.it
Since the introduction of genetically modified crops in 1996, their use has rapidly increased around the world. Of the 421 million acres globally, 172 million were in the United States.
Jamie Strickland's insight:

The article that is accompanied by this graphic is a good one to use in conjunction with films like "Food, Inc." or "Harvest of Fear" when discussing GMOs and complexities associated with them.  Addtionally, it can be a useful discussion starter when looking at issues of international trade and differing views on issues like GMOs.

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Signs of the European Union’s Weakening Economies

Signs of the European Union’s Weakening Economies | Global Connections | Scoop.it
Some of the largest economies in Europe — Germany, France, Britain and Sweden, among others — shrank in the fourth quarter of 2012.
Jamie Strickland's insight:

This is a very useful map for talking about recent economic conditions across the European Union.  In addition to identifying the level of recession risk, it also provides data on percentage change in GDP and the most recent unemployment rate.  Keep in mind the unemployment rate as of March 2013 of 7.6% (according to BLS).

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American Migration [Interactive Map] - Forbes

American Migration [Interactive Map] - Forbes | Global Connections | Scoop.it
Every year, close to 40 million Americans move from one home to another. This interactive map visualizes those moves for every county in the country.
Jamie Strickland's insight:

This is a neat visualization of county to county migration flows using anonymized IRS data.  In the accompanying article, geographer Michael Conzen and demographer Bill Frey provide insights (in addition to two other experts).

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In Jordan, an expanding refugee camp - The Washington Post

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The Tuareg in Mali

The Tuareg in Mali | Global Connections | Scoop.it
Jamie Strickland's insight:

A stateless nation?

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Which countries are most free — and most oppressive?

Which countries are most free — and most oppressive? | Global Connections | Scoop.it
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