Global Connections
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Increasing connections among countries and regions of the world.
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GPS Mix-Up Brings Wrong Turn, and Celebrity, to an American in Iceland

GPS Mix-Up Brings Wrong Turn, and Celebrity, to an American in Iceland | Global Connections | Scoop.it
Noel Santillan, a 28-year-old from New Jersey, typed the wrong address for his hotel and spent six hours on the road before realizing: This isn’t Reykjavik.
Jamie Strickland's insight:

Wow....just, Wow...give me a good old paper map any day.

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How Rural Brazil Celebrates Carnaval

How Rural Brazil Celebrates Carnaval | Global Connections | Scoop.it
Because this is a unique pocket of culture, often overlooked in the roar of Brazilian Carnaval.
Jamie Strickland's insight:

Interesting piece that can be used as an example of syncretic religion and cultural landscapes, gender roles and rural vs. urban cultural practice.  

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Nepal’s Historic Sites, Before and After the Earthquake

Nepal’s Historic Sites, Before and After the Earthquake | Global Connections | Scoop.it
The earthquake that struck Nepal on April 25 flattened sections of Katmandu’s historic center, where many structures were made with bricks.
Jamie Strickland's insight:

Many of us have been watching the devastation in Nepal after a 7.8 magnitude earthquake.  This resource from the New York Times allows us to look at the before and after of several historic sites in Katmandu.  The photos can be panned and rotated to get a 360 degree view simultaneously of what an area looked like before and after the quake.

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St. Patrick's Day Is the Most Global National Holiday

St. Patrick's Day Is the Most Global National Holiday | Global Connections | Scoop.it
How the wearing of the green has spread worldwide
Jamie Strickland's insight:

This is a great example of cultural globalization and neolocalism (both authentic and less than authentic ;-)).  The importance of immigration, the meaning of traditions and relocation diffusion are all  a part of this story.  Overall, a fun way to incorporate the Day into our classrooms.

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Crimean Tatars Will Have to Vacate Land

Crimean Tatars Will Have to Vacate Land | Global Connections | Scoop.it
Ukraine’s breakaway region of Crimea will ask Tatars to vacate part of the land where they now live in exchange for new territory elsewhere in the region, a top Crimean government official said Tuesday.

 

Crimean Deputy Prime Minister Rustam Temirgaliyev said in an interview with RIA Novosti on Tuesday the new government in Crimea, where residents voted Sunday to become part of Russia, wants to regularize the land unofficially taken over by Crimean Tatar squatters following the collapse of the Soviet Union.

“We have asked the Crimean Tatars to vacate part of their land, which is required for social needs,” Temirgaliyev said. “But we are ready to allocate and legalize many other plots of land to ensure a normal life for the Crimean Tatars,” he said.


Via Seth Dixon
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Stephen Zimmett's curator insight, March 20, 2014 11:55 AM

The same thing happened to these people back during World War 11. I saw this on Al Jazeera

Stephen Zimmett's comment, March 20, 2014 11:57 AM
The same thing happened to these people back in World War11
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Qatar's foreign domestic workers subjected to slave-like conditions

Qatar's foreign domestic workers subjected to slave-like conditions | Global Connections | Scoop.it
Revelations of mistreatment of maids and cleaners add to picture of widespread labour abuse in World Cup host nation
Jamie Strickland's insight:

This article deals with international labor migration in Qatar, the next country to host the FIFA World Cup after Brazil.  This highlights the abuses some domestic workers face when they leave their home country for employment.  It also highlights the institutionalized nature of labor migration in the Philippines.  This would make a good companion piece to the chapter on Qatar in "The Geography of Bliss".

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The slow decline of American Chinatowns

The slow decline of American Chinatowns | Global Connections | Scoop.it
Chinatowns across the US have lost much of their original character, but the one in Manhattan has remained a thriving immigrant community. That may now be changing.
Jamie Strickland's insight:
This article outlines significant changes occurring in an iconic ethnic landscape in the United States. Great example of urban social change and the implications of gentrification.
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Ship-Shipping Ships

Ship-Shipping Ships | Global Connections | Scoop.it

"This is a ship-shipping ship, shipping shipping ships."  http://geographyeducation.org/2013/10/14/ship-shipping-ships/

 


Via Seth Dixon
Jamie Strickland's insight:

First, this is a fantastic photo...a freighter shipping other freighters.  As my colleague Seth Dixon points out, this is a fantastic image of one of the important drivers of the acceleration of globalization in recent history.  

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jim dzialo's curator insight, October 16, 2013 2:54 PM

Pretty sure that doesn't fit in the panama canal

 

L.Long's curator insight, February 16, 2014 4:28 AM

The two industries that are the real backbone of globalization are transportation and communication.  What has accelerated the pace of global interconnectedness is the scale of these devices and their ubiquity in facilitating massive global commerce.

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 8:20 AM

The two industries that are the real backbone of globalization are transportation and communication.  What has accelerated the pace of global interconnectedness is the scale of these devices and their ubiquity in facilitating massive global commerce. Economies of scale infuse our transportation and communicating technologies, boosting the diffusion of countless other technologies. China's transportation infrastructure, for example has undergone some amazing physical transformations that have made their economic growth possible.  If, however, you only want to laugh at the tongue-twister of ship-shipping ships shipping shipping ships,  this is the internet meme for you. 


Tags: transportation, globalization, diffusion, industry, economic.

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Bolivia: A Country With No McDonald’s

Bolivia: A Country With No McDonald’s | Global Connections | Scoop.it
What America can learn from one of the most sustainable food nations on Earth.

Via Seth Dixon
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Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, February 28, 2015 5:50 PM

This is a fine example of people looking out for one another.  It might be easier to industrialize their food market but it's more admirable to preserve tradition, help small indigenous business, and try your best at making the country more healthy.  I applaud them for doing this.

Brian Wilk's curator insight, March 22, 2015 3:33 PM

I think I might want to move to Bolivia one day! Reciprocity is often a term used for corporate culture; you but from me and I'll buy from you type of relationship. This is still true in Bolivia only they do it on a much more personal level. Farmers share equipment, they share crops, seeds and develop a rapport not easily undone by corporations such as McDonald's. Bolivia's multiple micro-climates allow it to grow a wide variety of foods for their citizens, thus making it easier to trade within their circle of neighborhood farmers. "I'll trade you ten pounds of potatoes for five pounds of Quinoa."

The article goes on to state that Bolivians do indeed love their hamburgers, a handful of Subway's and Burger King's still do business there, but the heritage of picking a burger from a street vendor has been passed down by generations. These cholitas, as they are called, sell their fare in the streets of Bolivia and this type of transaction is not easily duplicated by large corporations. I have added Bolivia to my bucket list...

Tanya Townsend's curator insight, October 30, 2015 10:28 PM

" Whats Bolivia doing so right that McDonalds couldn't make it there?"

Food is not a commericial space here.

Morales, speaking to the United Nations General Assembly in February, slammed U.S. fast-food chains, calling them a “great harm to humanity” and accusing them of trying to control food production globally.

“They impose their customs and their foods,” he said. “They seek profit and to merely standardize food, produced on a massive scale, according to the same formula and with ingredients which cause cancers and other diseases.”

Even still, with one of the lightest carbon footprints in the world, cherished food practices and progressive food sovereignty laws on the books, Bolivia could still be a model to the rest of the world—the United States especially—for a healthier, more community-based food system.

 

What an insightful read. I never thought of considering our food a s a "commercial space" but that is essentially exactly what it is. Our food has been extremely commercialized. Products our pushed through advertisement continuously. Most of the foods in America are not even real food but food products, factory made. This is absolutely a role model country for how food should be consumed.

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Map of World's Flight Paths Is Gorgeous, Illuminating

The United States and China may be the world's biggest economic engines, but on this gorgeous map of the world's flight paths, Europe glows brighter than either one.
Jamie Strickland's insight:

This is pretty impressive....global connections in action...

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The spread of genetically modified crops

The spread of genetically modified crops | Global Connections | Scoop.it
Since the introduction of genetically modified crops in 1996, their use has rapidly increased around the world. Of the 421 million acres globally, 172 million were in the United States.
Jamie Strickland's insight:

The article that is accompanied by this graphic is a good one to use in conjunction with films like "Food, Inc." or "Harvest of Fear" when discussing GMOs and complexities associated with them.  Addtionally, it can be a useful discussion starter when looking at issues of international trade and differing views on issues like GMOs.

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Signs of the European Union’s Weakening Economies

Signs of the European Union’s Weakening Economies | Global Connections | Scoop.it
Some of the largest economies in Europe — Germany, France, Britain and Sweden, among others — shrank in the fourth quarter of 2012.
Jamie Strickland's insight:

This is a very useful map for talking about recent economic conditions across the European Union.  In addition to identifying the level of recession risk, it also provides data on percentage change in GDP and the most recent unemployment rate.  Keep in mind the unemployment rate as of March 2013 of 7.6% (according to BLS).

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American Migration [Interactive Map] - Forbes

American Migration [Interactive Map] - Forbes | Global Connections | Scoop.it
Every year, close to 40 million Americans move from one home to another. This interactive map visualizes those moves for every county in the country.
Jamie Strickland's insight:

This is a neat visualization of county to county migration flows using anonymized IRS data.  In the accompanying article, geographer Michael Conzen and demographer Bill Frey provide insights (in addition to two other experts).

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Icelanders Don’t Like Whale Meat—So Why the Hunts?

Icelanders Don’t Like Whale Meat—So Why the Hunts? | Global Connections | Scoop.it
Icelanders have little appetite for whale meat, but hunters are reluctant to give up the trade, a new film highlights.
Jamie Strickland's insight:

I am adding this to my "Why is __________ a world food problem?" assignment.  Very intriguing and (for me) disturbing rationale for whaling.

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Displaced Again and Again, Some African Migrants Had No Plan to Land in Italy

Displaced Again and Again, Some African Migrants Had No Plan to Land in Italy | Global Connections | Scoop.it
As nearby conflicts have reshaped Europe’s migrant flows recently, the current state of Libya has created migrants who might have had no other choice.
Jamie Strickland's insight:

Useful piece on the migration flows that are affecting Europe.  Good illustrations of how challenging it is to distinguish between voluntary and forced migration in some circumstances.

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Syrian Journey: Choose your own route

Syrian Journey: Choose your own route | Global Connections | Scoop.it
Put yourself in the shoes of a Syrian migrant and see whether you could make the right choices on the journey to Europe.

Via Seth Dixon
Jamie Strickland's insight:

Thanks to my friend Seth Dixon for this Scoop....It is a really well done interactive on the decision -making process that a refugee has to go through.  While it focuses on Syrian migrants, this would be a useful starting point for any discussion on forced migration.

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Norka McAlister's curator insight, April 5, 2015 8:01 PM

Citizens of Syria have experienced difficult times since their country entered into a period of continual war in the past few decades. People migrate to Europe in demand of better life for their families. All begin with a plan and a &helper,&  called trafficker or coyote in Mexico, and money to cross few borders and be able to live life free from war. Although, with countries such as Egypt, Lybia, Lebanon, Turkey, and Greece, with a massive migrations, tough economies, lack of jobs, nothing and no one is safe. However, Europe is very attractive in terms of quality life and safety to raise families. Furthermore, to be able to survive during this migration transition, many risks are involved and even in some cases, killings. Immigrants migrate by boat, truck, train, and sometimes even walking. Day or night immigrants keep moving and pay  high prices to be transported to the next point. It takes them weeks, months, and even years to reach thier final destinations. This is the same for those immigrants in Mexico and U.S. 

Claire Law's curator insight, April 25, 2015 8:41 PM

UK interactive resource to put students in the shoes of refugees fleeing conflict

zane alan berger's curator insight, May 26, 2015 4:42 PM

this is a virtual stimulator showing the struggle of a Syrian migrant, proving that one risky decision can be detrimental for these people. this can be related to the migration unit

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In this Nepali village, almost every family has a son or a daughter in the Middle East

In this Nepali village, almost every family has a son or a daughter in the Middle East | Global Connections | Scoop.it
A growing number of Nepali young men and women are leaving their homes in hopes of finding better jobs.
Jamie Strickland's insight:

This is a very good article that illustrates international labor migration - not just economically motivated immigration, but labor migration that is facilitated (contracted) by State agencies.  The Philippines are commonly used as an example for this phenomenon.  Now, we have the example of Nepal.

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Why do people choose to live in the ‘worst city in the world?’

Why do people choose to live in the ‘worst city in the world?’ | Global Connections | Scoop.it
Baghdad has a bad reputation.
Jamie Strickland's insight:

Here is an interesting piece on urban quality of life from the Washington Post's Worldviews blog.  It looks at a private human resources firm's ranking of the best and worst cities to live in for expatriates.  Rankings are fraught with problems, but give a very interesting window into the factors that influence where we would like to live, as well as where we are "willing" to live....for the right price.

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The slow decline of American Chinatowns

The slow decline of American Chinatowns | Global Connections | Scoop.it
Chinatowns across the US have lost much of their original character, but the one in Manhattan has remained a thriving immigrant community. That may now be changing.
Jamie Strickland's insight:
This article outlines significant changes occurring in an iconic ethnic landscape in the United States. Great example of urban social change and the implications of gentrification.
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9 questions about Ukraine you were too embarrassed to ask

9 questions about Ukraine you were too embarrassed to ask | Global Connections | Scoop.it
Yes, the first question is "What is Ukraine?"
Jamie Strickland's insight:

This comes from my favorite blog on the Washington Post's website (Worldviews).  I have marked this for my courses that deal with global connections (LBST 2102) and world regional geography (GEOG 1101).   In addition to serving as a potential example when talking about Eastern Europe in a regional course, this article and its accompanying video illustrates the potential for ethnic conflict within a country that stems from historical border/boundary changes.  This is a great way to talk about the importance of language as an indicator of ethnicity and the implications of that for political conflict.

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Burka Avenger

"Burka Avenger is a new Pakistani kids' show about a mild-mannered teacher who moonlights as a burka-clad superhero."


Via Seth Dixon
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Jacob Crowell's curator insight, November 19, 2014 12:45 PM

There is something to be said about how film and the media can be used as an effective tool to touch on broad cultural ideals. On a related note, I will be attending a conference soon in Boston on social studies education and one of the seminars I will be going to is how to use SciFi movies in the classroom. Ideals like equality, fighting oppression and free speech are timeless and span many cultures, in Pakistan, the Burka Avenger is that area's media outlet to discuss key social topics to young people.

Louis Mazza's curator insight, April 6, 2015 4:25 PM

A modern day Batman/Superman, Burka Avenger, with great graphics and an in-depth plot. The television shows the Pakistanis children watch are the same type of shows that I watched growing up, and the shows that the modern day children of today’s youth are watching. The cross-cultural relationship seems so different, but at the roots it is the same. The kids in this show have friends, pets, enemies, a hero, a conflict; everything that an American television show would feature.  Whether the kids are facing a bully, a school closure from a villain, or a life peril from another villain, there undercover school teacher is there ready and willing to save the day. Everybody needs a hero to look up to, so this show is great for the Pakistani youth. 

Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, May 6, 2015 10:06 AM

I think this is wonderful.  It also reemphasizes the reality that all children are born without preconceived notions of what is right, what is wrong, what is good, or what is evil.  An American child might look at this and automatically think that the lady in the Burka is a "villain", due to American media and propaganda.  I can't help but think of the backlash that would surround this cartoon if they ever tried to put it on American airwaves.  

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Not always with us

Not always with us | Global Connections | Scoop.it
IN SEPTEMBER 2000 the heads of 147 governments pledged that they would halve the proportion of people on the Earth living in the direst poverty by 2015, using the...
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In Smithfield, residents digest news of sale

In Smithfield, residents digest news of sale | Global Connections | Scoop.it
Some hope Chinese owners create new economic possibilities, while others fear a “downward spiral.”
Jamie Strickland's insight:

I often look for examples to share with my students about how "force of globalization" interact at various geographic scales.  This is a very good example of changes associated with global food production and consumption and the impact those can have on local places.

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Aral Sea Basin

Aral Sea Basin | Global Connections | Scoop.it

"Dust blows from what was once the Aral Sea floor. Tragic mismanagement of a natural resource."


Via Seth Dixon
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Jess Deady's curator insight, April 30, 2014 8:36 PM

The Aral Sea Basin has been a topic of conversation throughout geography for many reasons. What used to be filled with water is now blowing dust because its that dry? This basin is no longer a natural resource.

Gene Gagne's curator insight, November 18, 2015 3:30 PM

Here is a question. Do you think perhaps in the future this could happen to lake Mead in Nevada/Arizona? With all the non-stop building and no rain perhaps one day could it run dry or do we have a way to stop it.

Gene Gagne's curator insight, December 1, 2015 7:17 PM

Once there is less water in a lake there is less water in the air therefore less rain. The long term consequences is that the fishing industry is destroyed where once upon a time there were 61000 workers and now there are under 2000. The water is more saltier. The lands are now ill suited and unbuildable. Also the people there are prone to health problems.

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The Golan Heights

The Golan Heights | Global Connections | Scoop.it

In early November 2012, three Syrian tanks entered the demilitarized zone (DMZ) of the Golan Heights. The move by Syria is the first violation of the zone in 40 years and concerns countries of the region. Since then some of the Syrian rebels have also been reported operating in Golan Heights.


Via Seth Dixon
Jamie Strickland's insight:

This map can be used to illustrate not only the political and cultural significance of the Golan Heights, but also its environmental significance as a source of water for the Jordan-Yarmuk River Valley

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Louis Culotta's curator insight, April 4, 2013 6:35 PM

Heres some info on how poeple have been living in regards to a troubled area of the world.

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, March 19, 2014 9:08 AM

This article stresses the importance of geography when discussing political situation with neighboring countries.  The fact that the heights are such a strategic advantage to whoever owns them explains why they are so contested.  As long as these two countries are not friendly nations this disagreement over the strategic point will continue.

Martin Kemp's curator insight, December 17, 2015 2:26 PM

i never even heard of the Golan Heights before this and i would have never known the significance of this DMZ until now. this just sheds more light on what is happening in syria today.