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Global Connections
Increasing connections among countries and regions of the world.
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In this Nepali village, almost every family has a son or a daughter in the Middle East

In this Nepali village, almost every family has a son or a daughter in the Middle East | Global Connections | Scoop.it
A growing number of Nepali young men and women are leaving their homes in hopes of finding better jobs.
Jamie Strickland's insight:

This is a very good article that illustrates international labor migration - not just economically motivated immigration, but labor migration that is facilitated (contracted) by State agencies.  The Philippines are commonly used as an example for this phenomenon.  Now, we have the example of Nepal.

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Why do people choose to live in the ‘worst city in the world?’

Why do people choose to live in the ‘worst city in the world?’ | Global Connections | Scoop.it
Baghdad has a bad reputation.
Jamie Strickland's insight:

Here is an interesting piece on urban quality of life from the Washington Post's Worldviews blog.  It looks at a private human resources firm's ranking of the best and worst cities to live in for expatriates.  Rankings are fraught with problems, but give a very interesting window into the factors that influence where we would like to live, as well as where we are "willing" to live....for the right price.

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The slow decline of American Chinatowns

The slow decline of American Chinatowns | Global Connections | Scoop.it
Chinatowns across the US have lost much of their original character, but the one in Manhattan has remained a thriving immigrant community. That may now be changing.
Jamie Strickland's insight:
This article outlines significant changes occurring in an iconic ethnic landscape in the United States. Great example of urban social change and the implications of gentrification.
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9 questions about Ukraine you were too embarrassed to ask

9 questions about Ukraine you were too embarrassed to ask | Global Connections | Scoop.it
Yes, the first question is "What is Ukraine?"
Jamie Strickland's insight:

This comes from my favorite blog on the Washington Post's website (Worldviews).  I have marked this for my courses that deal with global connections (LBST 2102) and world regional geography (GEOG 1101).   In addition to serving as a potential example when talking about Eastern Europe in a regional course, this article and its accompanying video illustrates the potential for ethnic conflict within a country that stems from historical border/boundary changes.  This is a great way to talk about the importance of language as an indicator of ethnicity and the implications of that for political conflict.

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Burka Avenger

"Burka Avenger is a new Pakistani kids' show about a mild-mannered teacher who moonlights as a burka-clad superhero."


Via Seth Dixon
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Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, November 5, 8:20 PM

unit 3

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, November 5, 8:25 PM

unit 3

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, November 19, 12:45 PM

There is something to be said about how film and the media can be used as an effective tool to touch on broad cultural ideals. On a related note, I will be attending a conference soon in Boston on social studies education and one of the seminars I will be going to is how to use SciFi movies in the classroom. Ideals like equality, fighting oppression and free speech are timeless and span many cultures, in Pakistan, the Burka Avenger is that area's media outlet to discuss key social topics to young people.

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Not always with us

Not always with us | Global Connections | Scoop.it
IN SEPTEMBER 2000 the heads of 147 governments pledged that they would halve the proportion of people on the Earth living in the direst poverty by 2015, using the...
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In Smithfield, residents digest news of sale

In Smithfield, residents digest news of sale | Global Connections | Scoop.it
Some hope Chinese owners create new economic possibilities, while others fear a “downward spiral.”
Jamie Strickland's insight:

I often look for examples to share with my students about how "force of globalization" interact at various geographic scales.  This is a very good example of changes associated with global food production and consumption and the impact those can have on local places.

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Aral Sea Basin

Aral Sea Basin | Global Connections | Scoop.it

"Dust blows from what was once the Aral Sea floor. Tragic mismanagement of a natural resource."


Via Seth Dixon
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Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, February 20, 9:49 PM

This is a sad reality humans must live with forever and something we as people must learn from. A man made disaster that occurred many years ago has a negative impact on areas surrounding the shrinking Aral Sea to this day. People cannot exploit an area of water this large, as this is not only harming the environment, but many human beings, as well

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, March 3, 9:24 AM

This startling picture from space of the Aral Sea is heartbreaking.  The destruction of this inland sea is a terrible thing to behold.

Jess Deady's curator insight, April 30, 8:36 PM

The Aral Sea Basin has been a topic of conversation throughout geography for many reasons. What used to be filled with water is now blowing dust because its that dry? This basin is no longer a natural resource.

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The Golan Heights

The Golan Heights | Global Connections | Scoop.it

In early November 2012, three Syrian tanks entered the demilitarized zone (DMZ) of the Golan Heights. The move by Syria is the first violation of the zone in 40 years and concerns countries of the region. Since then some of the Syrian rebels have also been reported operating in Golan Heights.


Via Seth Dixon
Jamie Strickland's insight:

This map can be used to illustrate not only the political and cultural significance of the Golan Heights, but also its environmental significance as a source of water for the Jordan-Yarmuk River Valley

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Louis Culotta's curator insight, April 4, 2013 6:35 PM

Heres some info on how poeple have been living in regards to a troubled area of the world.

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, March 19, 9:08 AM

This article stresses the importance of geography when discussing political situation with neighboring countries.  The fact that the heights are such a strategic advantage to whoever owns them explains why they are so contested.  As long as these two countries are not friendly nations this disagreement over the strategic point will continue.

Shanelle Zaino's curator insight, October 29, 5:13 PM

To say the area of the Golan Heights is futile would be a drastic understatement. This area of land bordering Syria and northern Israel is of great importance to both of these sets of people. Over 40 years ago Israel claimed this land for their citizens because of it's high elevation and prime access to water supplies.Now in modern times Syria is making drastic moves to claim the land ,which they believe belongs to it's citizens. It is in the persistence of both of these sets of people that turmoil is being created. This is an important ares to both of these groups of people.If Syria is persistent in their attempts to claim this region it is fearful that Israel may need to fight back at some point. With these two countries at odds with each other it is possible more countries may also get involved.

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Israel’s Palestinian-only buses draw accusations of segregation, apartheid

Israel’s Palestinian-only buses draw accusations of segregation, apartheid | Global Connections | Scoop.it
Israel's Transportation Ministry launched the new bus lines after settlers complained Palestinians were a "security risk"
Jamie Strickland's insight:

"Separate but equal" in the West Bank.....

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Geography, health belong in Temecula schools - U-T San Diego

Geography, health belong in Temecula schools - U-T San Diego | Global Connections | Scoop.it
Geography, health belong in Temecula schools U-T San Diego This move makes absolutely no sense — particularly the move to strike geography, which in my day was every bit as important as the fabled “three R's.” At a time when globalization is one of...
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A Mysterious Patch Of Light Shows Up In The North Dakota Dark : NPR

A Mysterious Patch Of Light Shows Up In The North Dakota Dark : NPR | Global Connections | Scoop.it
If you are up in space looking down on America west of the Mississippi, one of the brightest patches of light at night is on the Great Plains in North Dakota. It's not a city, not a town, not a military installation.
Jamie Strickland's insight:

How cool is this?!?!  Thanks gain to Seth Dixon for the heads up.  This one is becoming a bonus question for class next week.

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Jesse Olsen's comment, February 18, 2013 2:28 PM
That video is incredible
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Arrests Made in Maple Syrup Theft From Quebec Warehouse

Arrests Made in Maple Syrup Theft From Quebec Warehouse | Global Connections | Scoop.it
The police in Quebec arrested three men in connection with the theft of six million pounds of syrup from Canada’s global strategic maple syrup reserve.
Jamie Strickland's insight:

And you thought oil was a valuable commodity....And no comments about "sticky situations" please!

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Crimean Tatars Will Have to Vacate Land

Crimean Tatars Will Have to Vacate Land | Global Connections | Scoop.it
Ukraine’s breakaway region of Crimea will ask Tatars to vacate part of the land where they now live in exchange for new territory elsewhere in the region, a top Crimean government official said Tuesday.

 

Crimean Deputy Prime Minister Rustam Temirgaliyev said in an interview with RIA Novosti on Tuesday the new government in Crimea, where residents voted Sunday to become part of Russia, wants to regularize the land unofficially taken over by Crimean Tatar squatters following the collapse of the Soviet Union.

“We have asked the Crimean Tatars to vacate part of their land, which is required for social needs,” Temirgaliyev said. “But we are ready to allocate and legalize many other plots of land to ensure a normal life for the Crimean Tatars,” he said.


Via Seth Dixon
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Stephen Zimmett's curator insight, March 20, 11:55 AM

The same thing happened to these people back during World War 11. I saw this on Al Jazeera

Stephen Zimmett's comment, March 20, 11:57 AM
The same thing happened to these people back in World War11
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Qatar's foreign domestic workers subjected to slave-like conditions

Qatar's foreign domestic workers subjected to slave-like conditions | Global Connections | Scoop.it
Revelations of mistreatment of maids and cleaners add to picture of widespread labour abuse in World Cup host nation
Jamie Strickland's insight:

This article deals with international labor migration in Qatar, the next country to host the FIFA World Cup after Brazil.  This highlights the abuses some domestic workers face when they leave their home country for employment.  It also highlights the institutionalized nature of labor migration in the Philippines.  This would make a good companion piece to the chapter on Qatar in "The Geography of Bliss".

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The slow decline of American Chinatowns

The slow decline of American Chinatowns | Global Connections | Scoop.it
Chinatowns across the US have lost much of their original character, but the one in Manhattan has remained a thriving immigrant community. That may now be changing.
Jamie Strickland's insight:
This article outlines significant changes occurring in an iconic ethnic landscape in the United States. Great example of urban social change and the implications of gentrification.
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Ship-Shipping Ships

Ship-Shipping Ships | Global Connections | Scoop.it

"This is a ship-shipping ship, shipping shipping ships."  http://geographyeducation.org/2013/10/14/ship-shipping-ships/

 


Via Seth Dixon
Jamie Strickland's insight:

First, this is a fantastic photo...a freighter shipping other freighters.  As my colleague Seth Dixon points out, this is a fantastic image of one of the important drivers of the acceleration of globalization in recent history.  

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jim dzialo's curator insight, October 16, 2013 2:54 PM

Pretty sure that doesn't fit in the panama canal

 

L.Long's curator insight, February 16, 4:28 AM

The two industries that are the real backbone of globalization are transportation and communication.  What has accelerated the pace of global interconnectedness is the scale of these devices and their ubiquity in facilitating massive global commerce.

Shanelle Zaino's curator insight, September 10, 2:33 PM

#shippingships

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Bolivia: A Country With No McDonald’s

Bolivia: A Country With No McDonald’s | Global Connections | Scoop.it
What America can learn from one of the most sustainable food nations on Earth.

Via Seth Dixon
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Edelin Espino's curator insight, November 27, 2:34 PM

McDonalds broke in Quinoa Bolivia. A somewhat interesting news because McDonalds is a fast food restaurant quite famous and to break is pretty rare. But Bolivians prefer hamburgers that the Chachitas do and they also prefer to eat their daily diet than fast food. This place called Quinoa in Bolivia is a really interesting place free of McDonald.

Kaitlin Young's curator insight, December 12, 4:28 PM

Bolivia is one of the few countries where McDonalds failed, so Bolivia is obviously doing something right in regards to its food industry. Bolivians' love of traditional food coupled with the loyalty to street vendors and local businesses. Bolivia does not treat its food industries as a potential market, but instead many food transactions involve trade as opposed to currency. Laws conserving local food culture and the elimination of most foreign parties has allowed for a very effective food sovereignty. 

 

Many countries, especially the United States, could benefit from this "food sovereignty", where the local individuals are honored and protected while large corporations are kept an arm's length away. Not only does this boost local small scale economies, but it would decrease pollution and preserve food culture.   

Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 17, 12:00 AM

"A Country With No McDonalds". I read this and thought to myself, how bad can that be? McDonalds isn't exactly the best option for food. In Bolivia, McDonalds doesn't exist and hasn't for about a decade. Believe it or not, McDonalds couldn't survive in the mountainous area so they were forced to close down in 2002. In 2011, a documentary was made about how odd it was that Bolivia didn't have a McDonalds. The documentary tells us that one of the main reasons the fast food restaurant closed down was because Bolivians preferred their traditional food over fast food. The documentary also stated that Bolivians do love hamburgers, which are not traditional. However, they prefer to buy them from the many indigenous women hawking food on the streets. People line up for these hamburgers on the street, so its almost like their own form of McDonalds. Mostly, they prefer to buy from people they have a relationship with, typically from their own community.

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Map of World's Flight Paths Is Gorgeous, Illuminating

The United States and China may be the world's biggest economic engines, but on this gorgeous map of the world's flight paths, Europe glows brighter than either one.
Jamie Strickland's insight:

This is pretty impressive....global connections in action...

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The spread of genetically modified crops

The spread of genetically modified crops | Global Connections | Scoop.it
Since the introduction of genetically modified crops in 1996, their use has rapidly increased around the world. Of the 421 million acres globally, 172 million were in the United States.
Jamie Strickland's insight:

The article that is accompanied by this graphic is a good one to use in conjunction with films like "Food, Inc." or "Harvest of Fear" when discussing GMOs and complexities associated with them.  Addtionally, it can be a useful discussion starter when looking at issues of international trade and differing views on issues like GMOs.

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Signs of the European Union’s Weakening Economies

Signs of the European Union’s Weakening Economies | Global Connections | Scoop.it
Some of the largest economies in Europe — Germany, France, Britain and Sweden, among others — shrank in the fourth quarter of 2012.
Jamie Strickland's insight:

This is a very useful map for talking about recent economic conditions across the European Union.  In addition to identifying the level of recession risk, it also provides data on percentage change in GDP and the most recent unemployment rate.  Keep in mind the unemployment rate as of March 2013 of 7.6% (according to BLS).

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American Migration [Interactive Map] - Forbes

American Migration [Interactive Map] - Forbes | Global Connections | Scoop.it
Every year, close to 40 million Americans move from one home to another. This interactive map visualizes those moves for every county in the country.
Jamie Strickland's insight:

This is a neat visualization of county to county migration flows using anonymized IRS data.  In the accompanying article, geographer Michael Conzen and demographer Bill Frey provide insights (in addition to two other experts).

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